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Developing a mobility protocol for early mobilization of patients in a surgical/trauma ICU.

Zomorodi M, Topley D, McAnaw M - Crit Care Res Pract (2012)

Bottom Line: As technology and medications have improved and increased, survival rates are also increasing in intensive care units (ICUs), so it is now important to focus on improving the patient outcomes and recovery.Frequently, a critically ill patient only receives movement from nurses; such as, being turned side to side, pulled up in bed, or transferred from bed to a stretcher for a test.The implementation of an early mobility protocol that can be used by critical care nurses is important for positive patient outcomes minimizing the functional decline due to an ICU stay.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Chapel Hill School of Nursing, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7460, USA.

ABSTRACT
As technology and medications have improved and increased, survival rates are also increasing in intensive care units (ICUs), so it is now important to focus on improving the patient outcomes and recovery. To do this, ICU patients need to be assessed and started on an early mobility program, if stable. While the early mobilization of the ICU patients is not without risk, the current literature has demonstrated that patients can be safely and feasibly mobilized, even while requiring mechanical ventilation. These patients are at a high risk for muscle deconditioning due to limited mobility from numerous monitoring equipment and multiple medical conditions. Frequently, a critically ill patient only receives movement from nurses; such as, being turned side to side, pulled up in bed, or transferred from bed to a stretcher for a test. The implementation of an early mobility protocol that can be used by critical care nurses is important for positive patient outcomes minimizing the functional decline due to an ICU stay. This paper describes a pilot study to evaluate an early mobilization protocol to test the safety and feasibility for mechanically ventilated patients in a surgical trauma ICU in conjunction with the current unit standards.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Final mobility protocol.
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fig3: Final mobility protocol.

Mentions: Following implementation with the pilot participants, the decision was made to relax the parameter for transitioning from Activity Level 1 to Activity Level 2 from 3/5 muscle strength in both arms and legs to 2/5 muscle strength in all extremities. The decision to alter the protocol was made based on observation of the patients and clinical judgment of the research team. The research team determined that participants would be ready to progress to the second activity at an earlier pace than the original protocol anticipated. The final mobility protocol is presented as Figure 3.


Developing a mobility protocol for early mobilization of patients in a surgical/trauma ICU.

Zomorodi M, Topley D, McAnaw M - Crit Care Res Pract (2012)

Final mobility protocol.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3539434&req=5

fig3: Final mobility protocol.
Mentions: Following implementation with the pilot participants, the decision was made to relax the parameter for transitioning from Activity Level 1 to Activity Level 2 from 3/5 muscle strength in both arms and legs to 2/5 muscle strength in all extremities. The decision to alter the protocol was made based on observation of the patients and clinical judgment of the research team. The research team determined that participants would be ready to progress to the second activity at an earlier pace than the original protocol anticipated. The final mobility protocol is presented as Figure 3.

Bottom Line: As technology and medications have improved and increased, survival rates are also increasing in intensive care units (ICUs), so it is now important to focus on improving the patient outcomes and recovery.Frequently, a critically ill patient only receives movement from nurses; such as, being turned side to side, pulled up in bed, or transferred from bed to a stretcher for a test.The implementation of an early mobility protocol that can be used by critical care nurses is important for positive patient outcomes minimizing the functional decline due to an ICU stay.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Chapel Hill School of Nursing, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7460, USA.

ABSTRACT
As technology and medications have improved and increased, survival rates are also increasing in intensive care units (ICUs), so it is now important to focus on improving the patient outcomes and recovery. To do this, ICU patients need to be assessed and started on an early mobility program, if stable. While the early mobilization of the ICU patients is not without risk, the current literature has demonstrated that patients can be safely and feasibly mobilized, even while requiring mechanical ventilation. These patients are at a high risk for muscle deconditioning due to limited mobility from numerous monitoring equipment and multiple medical conditions. Frequently, a critically ill patient only receives movement from nurses; such as, being turned side to side, pulled up in bed, or transferred from bed to a stretcher for a test. The implementation of an early mobility protocol that can be used by critical care nurses is important for positive patient outcomes minimizing the functional decline due to an ICU stay. This paper describes a pilot study to evaluate an early mobilization protocol to test the safety and feasibility for mechanically ventilated patients in a surgical trauma ICU in conjunction with the current unit standards.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus