Limits...
Modeling Airflow Using Subject-Specific 4DCT-Based Deformable Volumetric Lung Models.

Ilegbusi OJ, Li Z, Seyfi B, Min Y, Meeks S, Kupelian P, Santhanam AP - Int J Biomed Imaging (2012)

Bottom Line: A flow-structure interaction technique is employed that simultaneously models airflow and lung deformation.The results include the 3D anisotropic lung deformation for known airflow pattern inside the lungs.The effects of anisotropy are also presented on both the spatiotemporal volumetric lung displacement and the regional lung hysteresis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical Materials and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816, USA.

ABSTRACT
Lung radiotherapy is greatly benefitted when the tumor motion caused by breathing can be modeled. The aim of this paper is to present the importance of using anisotropic and subject-specific tissue elasticity for simulating the airflow inside the lungs. A computational-fluid-dynamics (CFD) based approach is presented to simulate airflow inside a subject-specific deformable lung for modeling lung tumor motion and the motion of the surrounding tissues during radiotherapy. A flow-structure interaction technique is employed that simultaneously models airflow and lung deformation. The lung is modeled as a poroelastic medium with subject-specific anisotropic poroelastic properties on a geometry, which was reconstructed from four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scan datasets of humans with lung cancer. The results include the 3D anisotropic lung deformation for known airflow pattern inside the lungs. The effects of anisotropy are also presented on both the spatiotemporal volumetric lung displacement and the regional lung hysteresis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Predicted displacement for nodes A, B, and C over 6 breathing cycles with isotropic YM.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3539421&req=5

fig10: Predicted displacement for nodes A, B, and C over 6 breathing cycles with isotropic YM.

Mentions: In order to further examine the effect of anisotropicity, the calculations were continued for additional breathing cycles. Figure 10 shows the x, y, z displacements of nodes A, B, and C for linear YM over 6 breathing cycles. The entire displacement wave pattern becomes stable after the second breathing cycle. The result indicates that all the peak displacement values occur at the midpoint of each cycle, that is, at t = 2 s, 6 s and 10 s. The displacements at the end of each cycle are nearly negligible. It is worth noting that in the consensus of the result presented in a previous Figure 9, the displacement profile observed with linear elasticity follows closely the input pressure wave pattern.


Modeling Airflow Using Subject-Specific 4DCT-Based Deformable Volumetric Lung Models.

Ilegbusi OJ, Li Z, Seyfi B, Min Y, Meeks S, Kupelian P, Santhanam AP - Int J Biomed Imaging (2012)

Predicted displacement for nodes A, B, and C over 6 breathing cycles with isotropic YM.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3539421&req=5

fig10: Predicted displacement for nodes A, B, and C over 6 breathing cycles with isotropic YM.
Mentions: In order to further examine the effect of anisotropicity, the calculations were continued for additional breathing cycles. Figure 10 shows the x, y, z displacements of nodes A, B, and C for linear YM over 6 breathing cycles. The entire displacement wave pattern becomes stable after the second breathing cycle. The result indicates that all the peak displacement values occur at the midpoint of each cycle, that is, at t = 2 s, 6 s and 10 s. The displacements at the end of each cycle are nearly negligible. It is worth noting that in the consensus of the result presented in a previous Figure 9, the displacement profile observed with linear elasticity follows closely the input pressure wave pattern.

Bottom Line: A flow-structure interaction technique is employed that simultaneously models airflow and lung deformation.The results include the 3D anisotropic lung deformation for known airflow pattern inside the lungs.The effects of anisotropy are also presented on both the spatiotemporal volumetric lung displacement and the regional lung hysteresis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical Materials and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816, USA.

ABSTRACT
Lung radiotherapy is greatly benefitted when the tumor motion caused by breathing can be modeled. The aim of this paper is to present the importance of using anisotropic and subject-specific tissue elasticity for simulating the airflow inside the lungs. A computational-fluid-dynamics (CFD) based approach is presented to simulate airflow inside a subject-specific deformable lung for modeling lung tumor motion and the motion of the surrounding tissues during radiotherapy. A flow-structure interaction technique is employed that simultaneously models airflow and lung deformation. The lung is modeled as a poroelastic medium with subject-specific anisotropic poroelastic properties on a geometry, which was reconstructed from four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scan datasets of humans with lung cancer. The results include the 3D anisotropic lung deformation for known airflow pattern inside the lungs. The effects of anisotropy are also presented on both the spatiotemporal volumetric lung displacement and the regional lung hysteresis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus