Limits...
Trace element supplementation of livestock in new zealand: meeting the challenges of free-range grazing systems.

Grace ND, Knowles SO - Vet Med Int (2012)

Bottom Line: On farms where grazing animals are infrequently yarded, there are limited opportunities to administer trace element supplements via feeds and concentrates.In New Zealand, where the majority of sheep, cattle, and deer graze pasture year round, inadequate intake of cobalt, copper, iodine and selenium is prevalent.Supplementation methods suited to grazing livestock include long-acting injections, slow-release intraruminal boluses, trace element-amended fertilisers, and reticulated water supplies on dairy farms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 26 Williams Road, RD 4, Palmerston North 4474, New Zealand.

ABSTRACT
Managing the mineral nutrition of free-range grazing livestock can be challenging. On farms where grazing animals are infrequently yarded, there are limited opportunities to administer trace element supplements via feeds and concentrates. In New Zealand, where the majority of sheep, cattle, and deer graze pasture year round, inadequate intake of cobalt, copper, iodine and selenium is prevalent. Scientists and farmers have developed efficient strategies to monitor and treat these dietary deficiencies. Supplementation methods suited to grazing livestock include long-acting injections, slow-release intraruminal boluses, trace element-amended fertilisers, and reticulated water supplies on dairy farms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of none (●) or 10 g Se/ha as sodium selenate (∆) or sodium selenate plus barium selenate (◯) applied to pastures grazed by dairy cows on the concentrations of Se in (a) blood, and (b) pasture herbage. Adequate Se status is indicated by blood Se >250 nmol/L and herbage Se >0.03 mg/kg DM [49].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3539419&req=5

fig9: Effect of none (●) or 10 g Se/ha as sodium selenate (∆) or sodium selenate plus barium selenate (◯) applied to pastures grazed by dairy cows on the concentrations of Se in (a) blood, and (b) pasture herbage. Adequate Se status is indicated by blood Se >250 nmol/L and herbage Se >0.03 mg/kg DM [49].

Mentions: Recommended application rate is 10 g Se/ha, usually carried in semisoluble “prills” applied annually during the autumn or the spring. Herbage Se concentrations can increase 20–35 fold (e.g., from 0.03 to 1.0 mg Se/kg DM) during the first month before falling sharply then more slowly over the next 70–120 days [49, 50]. The Se status of grazing livestock responds to this high Se intake. The changes in blood Se concentrations of dairy cows on treated pastures are shown in Figure 9. A similar response has been observed in sheep [51].


Trace element supplementation of livestock in new zealand: meeting the challenges of free-range grazing systems.

Grace ND, Knowles SO - Vet Med Int (2012)

Effect of none (●) or 10 g Se/ha as sodium selenate (∆) or sodium selenate plus barium selenate (◯) applied to pastures grazed by dairy cows on the concentrations of Se in (a) blood, and (b) pasture herbage. Adequate Se status is indicated by blood Se >250 nmol/L and herbage Se >0.03 mg/kg DM [49].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3539419&req=5

fig9: Effect of none (●) or 10 g Se/ha as sodium selenate (∆) or sodium selenate plus barium selenate (◯) applied to pastures grazed by dairy cows on the concentrations of Se in (a) blood, and (b) pasture herbage. Adequate Se status is indicated by blood Se >250 nmol/L and herbage Se >0.03 mg/kg DM [49].
Mentions: Recommended application rate is 10 g Se/ha, usually carried in semisoluble “prills” applied annually during the autumn or the spring. Herbage Se concentrations can increase 20–35 fold (e.g., from 0.03 to 1.0 mg Se/kg DM) during the first month before falling sharply then more slowly over the next 70–120 days [49, 50]. The Se status of grazing livestock responds to this high Se intake. The changes in blood Se concentrations of dairy cows on treated pastures are shown in Figure 9. A similar response has been observed in sheep [51].

Bottom Line: On farms where grazing animals are infrequently yarded, there are limited opportunities to administer trace element supplements via feeds and concentrates.In New Zealand, where the majority of sheep, cattle, and deer graze pasture year round, inadequate intake of cobalt, copper, iodine and selenium is prevalent.Supplementation methods suited to grazing livestock include long-acting injections, slow-release intraruminal boluses, trace element-amended fertilisers, and reticulated water supplies on dairy farms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 26 Williams Road, RD 4, Palmerston North 4474, New Zealand.

ABSTRACT
Managing the mineral nutrition of free-range grazing livestock can be challenging. On farms where grazing animals are infrequently yarded, there are limited opportunities to administer trace element supplements via feeds and concentrates. In New Zealand, where the majority of sheep, cattle, and deer graze pasture year round, inadequate intake of cobalt, copper, iodine and selenium is prevalent. Scientists and farmers have developed efficient strategies to monitor and treat these dietary deficiencies. Supplementation methods suited to grazing livestock include long-acting injections, slow-release intraruminal boluses, trace element-amended fertilisers, and reticulated water supplies on dairy farms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus