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Trace element supplementation of livestock in new zealand: meeting the challenges of free-range grazing systems.

Grace ND, Knowles SO - Vet Med Int (2012)

Bottom Line: On farms where grazing animals are infrequently yarded, there are limited opportunities to administer trace element supplements via feeds and concentrates.In New Zealand, where the majority of sheep, cattle, and deer graze pasture year round, inadequate intake of cobalt, copper, iodine and selenium is prevalent.Supplementation methods suited to grazing livestock include long-acting injections, slow-release intraruminal boluses, trace element-amended fertilisers, and reticulated water supplies on dairy farms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 26 Williams Road, RD 4, Palmerston North 4474, New Zealand.

ABSTRACT
Managing the mineral nutrition of free-range grazing livestock can be challenging. On farms where grazing animals are infrequently yarded, there are limited opportunities to administer trace element supplements via feeds and concentrates. In New Zealand, where the majority of sheep, cattle, and deer graze pasture year round, inadequate intake of cobalt, copper, iodine and selenium is prevalent. Scientists and farmers have developed efficient strategies to monitor and treat these dietary deficiencies. Supplementation methods suited to grazing livestock include long-acting injections, slow-release intraruminal boluses, trace element-amended fertilisers, and reticulated water supplies on dairy farms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of no treatment (□) or bolus administration of 5 g CuO wire particles (about 0.1 g Cu/kg LW) (■) administered to pregnant ewes early in gestation on the concentrations of Cu in (a) serum, and (b) liver of ewes (□, ■) and their lambs (∆, ▲). Although the flock was not initially Cu deficient, efficacy of CuO particles was demonstrated by changes in liver Cu concentrations [14].
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig7: Effect of no treatment (□) or bolus administration of 5 g CuO wire particles (about 0.1 g Cu/kg LW) (■) administered to pregnant ewes early in gestation on the concentrations of Cu in (a) serum, and (b) liver of ewes (□, ■) and their lambs (∆, ▲). Although the flock was not initially Cu deficient, efficacy of CuO particles was demonstrated by changes in liver Cu concentrations [14].

Mentions: A Cu bolus given to ewes and dairy cows during early gestation will increase Cu reserves of the foetus and Cu status of the newborn. The effect in ewes and their lambs from birth to weaning is shown in Figure 7 [14]. A similar pattern has been observed in cattle [42]. These results illustrate the importance of using the correct tissue and biochemical criterion to assess the efficacy of a mineral supplement [43]. While serum Cu changed little in these adequate-status animals, there was a substantial increase in liver Cu concentration, an effect that is consistently seen elsewhere [44].


Trace element supplementation of livestock in new zealand: meeting the challenges of free-range grazing systems.

Grace ND, Knowles SO - Vet Med Int (2012)

Effect of no treatment (□) or bolus administration of 5 g CuO wire particles (about 0.1 g Cu/kg LW) (■) administered to pregnant ewes early in gestation on the concentrations of Cu in (a) serum, and (b) liver of ewes (□, ■) and their lambs (∆, ▲). Although the flock was not initially Cu deficient, efficacy of CuO particles was demonstrated by changes in liver Cu concentrations [14].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3539419&req=5

fig7: Effect of no treatment (□) or bolus administration of 5 g CuO wire particles (about 0.1 g Cu/kg LW) (■) administered to pregnant ewes early in gestation on the concentrations of Cu in (a) serum, and (b) liver of ewes (□, ■) and their lambs (∆, ▲). Although the flock was not initially Cu deficient, efficacy of CuO particles was demonstrated by changes in liver Cu concentrations [14].
Mentions: A Cu bolus given to ewes and dairy cows during early gestation will increase Cu reserves of the foetus and Cu status of the newborn. The effect in ewes and their lambs from birth to weaning is shown in Figure 7 [14]. A similar pattern has been observed in cattle [42]. These results illustrate the importance of using the correct tissue and biochemical criterion to assess the efficacy of a mineral supplement [43]. While serum Cu changed little in these adequate-status animals, there was a substantial increase in liver Cu concentration, an effect that is consistently seen elsewhere [44].

Bottom Line: On farms where grazing animals are infrequently yarded, there are limited opportunities to administer trace element supplements via feeds and concentrates.In New Zealand, where the majority of sheep, cattle, and deer graze pasture year round, inadequate intake of cobalt, copper, iodine and selenium is prevalent.Supplementation methods suited to grazing livestock include long-acting injections, slow-release intraruminal boluses, trace element-amended fertilisers, and reticulated water supplies on dairy farms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 26 Williams Road, RD 4, Palmerston North 4474, New Zealand.

ABSTRACT
Managing the mineral nutrition of free-range grazing livestock can be challenging. On farms where grazing animals are infrequently yarded, there are limited opportunities to administer trace element supplements via feeds and concentrates. In New Zealand, where the majority of sheep, cattle, and deer graze pasture year round, inadequate intake of cobalt, copper, iodine and selenium is prevalent. Scientists and farmers have developed efficient strategies to monitor and treat these dietary deficiencies. Supplementation methods suited to grazing livestock include long-acting injections, slow-release intraruminal boluses, trace element-amended fertilisers, and reticulated water supplies on dairy farms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus