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Trace element supplementation of livestock in new zealand: meeting the challenges of free-range grazing systems.

Grace ND, Knowles SO - Vet Med Int (2012)

Bottom Line: On farms where grazing animals are infrequently yarded, there are limited opportunities to administer trace element supplements via feeds and concentrates.In New Zealand, where the majority of sheep, cattle, and deer graze pasture year round, inadequate intake of cobalt, copper, iodine and selenium is prevalent.Supplementation methods suited to grazing livestock include long-acting injections, slow-release intraruminal boluses, trace element-amended fertilisers, and reticulated water supplies on dairy farms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 26 Williams Road, RD 4, Palmerston North 4474, New Zealand.

ABSTRACT
Managing the mineral nutrition of free-range grazing livestock can be challenging. On farms where grazing animals are infrequently yarded, there are limited opportunities to administer trace element supplements via feeds and concentrates. In New Zealand, where the majority of sheep, cattle, and deer graze pasture year round, inadequate intake of cobalt, copper, iodine and selenium is prevalent. Scientists and farmers have developed efficient strategies to monitor and treat these dietary deficiencies. Supplementation methods suited to grazing livestock include long-acting injections, slow-release intraruminal boluses, trace element-amended fertilisers, and reticulated water supplies on dairy farms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of the effects of administration of a cobaltised oral drench, a soluble vitamin B12 injection, a Co-containing intraruminal bolus, and a long-acting vitamin B12 injection on the serum vitamin B12 concentrations of sheep. Serum vitamin B12 >350 pmol/L indicates adequate vitamin B12 status, above which animals are unlikely to respond to supplementation in terms of improved performance or production.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig2: Comparison of the effects of administration of a cobaltised oral drench, a soluble vitamin B12 injection, a Co-containing intraruminal bolus, and a long-acting vitamin B12 injection on the serum vitamin B12 concentrations of sheep. Serum vitamin B12 >350 pmol/L indicates adequate vitamin B12 status, above which animals are unlikely to respond to supplementation in terms of improved performance or production.

Mentions: The efficacies of options for supplementing livestock with Se and Co are compared in Figures 1 and 2, [15, 16]. Sustained results are obtained with trace element-amended fertiliser, intraruminal boluses, and injections formulated to create a subcutaneous or intramuscular depot that provides slow and controlled release. In this paper, we emphasise those methods and review their use in some detail.


Trace element supplementation of livestock in new zealand: meeting the challenges of free-range grazing systems.

Grace ND, Knowles SO - Vet Med Int (2012)

Comparison of the effects of administration of a cobaltised oral drench, a soluble vitamin B12 injection, a Co-containing intraruminal bolus, and a long-acting vitamin B12 injection on the serum vitamin B12 concentrations of sheep. Serum vitamin B12 >350 pmol/L indicates adequate vitamin B12 status, above which animals are unlikely to respond to supplementation in terms of improved performance or production.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3539419&req=5

fig2: Comparison of the effects of administration of a cobaltised oral drench, a soluble vitamin B12 injection, a Co-containing intraruminal bolus, and a long-acting vitamin B12 injection on the serum vitamin B12 concentrations of sheep. Serum vitamin B12 >350 pmol/L indicates adequate vitamin B12 status, above which animals are unlikely to respond to supplementation in terms of improved performance or production.
Mentions: The efficacies of options for supplementing livestock with Se and Co are compared in Figures 1 and 2, [15, 16]. Sustained results are obtained with trace element-amended fertiliser, intraruminal boluses, and injections formulated to create a subcutaneous or intramuscular depot that provides slow and controlled release. In this paper, we emphasise those methods and review their use in some detail.

Bottom Line: On farms where grazing animals are infrequently yarded, there are limited opportunities to administer trace element supplements via feeds and concentrates.In New Zealand, where the majority of sheep, cattle, and deer graze pasture year round, inadequate intake of cobalt, copper, iodine and selenium is prevalent.Supplementation methods suited to grazing livestock include long-acting injections, slow-release intraruminal boluses, trace element-amended fertilisers, and reticulated water supplies on dairy farms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 26 Williams Road, RD 4, Palmerston North 4474, New Zealand.

ABSTRACT
Managing the mineral nutrition of free-range grazing livestock can be challenging. On farms where grazing animals are infrequently yarded, there are limited opportunities to administer trace element supplements via feeds and concentrates. In New Zealand, where the majority of sheep, cattle, and deer graze pasture year round, inadequate intake of cobalt, copper, iodine and selenium is prevalent. Scientists and farmers have developed efficient strategies to monitor and treat these dietary deficiencies. Supplementation methods suited to grazing livestock include long-acting injections, slow-release intraruminal boluses, trace element-amended fertilisers, and reticulated water supplies on dairy farms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus