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Fatigue, tiredness, lack of energy, and sleepiness in multiple sclerosis patients referred for clinical polysomnography.

Braley TJ, Chervin RD, Segal BM - Mult Scler Int (2012)

Bottom Line: Objectives.Results.Conclusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Sleep Disorders Center, and Holtom-Garrett Program in Neuroimmunology, University of Michigan, C728 Med-Inn Building, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.

ABSTRACT
Objectives. To assess the relationship between nocturnal polysomnographic (PSG) findings and a group of key self-reported symptoms-fatigue, tiredness, lack of energy, and sleepiness-among sleep-laboratory referred patients with and without multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods. PSG and questionnaire data from n = 30 MS patients and n = 30 matched controls were analyzed retrospectively. Associations between symptoms of fatigue, tiredness, lack of energy, sleepiness, and PSG variables of interest were examined among MS patients and controls. Results. More MS patients than controls reported fatigue, tiredness, and lack of energy to occur often or almost always (Chi-square P < 0.0001 for each), but sleepiness was reported similarly by both groups (P = 0.3409). Among MS patients, tiredness correlated with sleepiness (Spearman correlation P = 0.005), and a trend emerged toward correlation between fatigue and sleepiness (Spearman correlation P = 0.076). Decreased sleep efficiency on PSGs correlated with fatigue, tiredness, and lack of energy in MS patients (Spearman correlation P = 0.002, 0.029, and 0.048, resp.), but not sleepiness or any symptom among controls. Conclusion. In comparison to controls, MS patients report more fatigue, tiredness, and lack energy, but not sleepiness. Fatigue and related symptoms may arise from MS itself or in relation to reduced sleep efficiency.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Frequencies of Likert responses for problematic sleepiness (a), fatigue (b), tiredness (c), and lack of energy (d) among MS patients (group 1) and matched controls (group 0). 1 = “never;” 2 = “seldom;” 3 = “occasionally;” 4 = “often;” and 5 = “almost always”.
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fig1: Frequencies of Likert responses for problematic sleepiness (a), fatigue (b), tiredness (c), and lack of energy (d) among MS patients (group 1) and matched controls (group 0). 1 = “never;” 2 = “seldom;” 3 = “occasionally;” 4 = “often;” and 5 = “almost always”.

Mentions: Response rates to categorical UMSIA items and distribution of symptom frequencies for MS patients and matched controls are shown in Figure 1. When responses were dichotomized, significantly more MS patients than controls reported fatigue, tiredness, and lack of energy to occur often or almost always (90% versus 18%, 77% versus 0%, and 90% versus 7%; Chi-square P < 0.0001 for each). Conversely, frequent sleepiness as per the UMSIA was reported similarly by both groups (53% versus 65%; P = 0.3409). There were strong correlations between fatigue, tiredness, and lack of energy in both groups (Table 2). Among MS patients, tiredness correlated with sleepiness, (rho = 0.50; P = 0.005), and a trend emerged toward a significant correlation between fatigue and sleepiness (rho = 0.33; P = 0.076). Among controls, fatigue correlated with sleepiness (rho = 0.45; P = 0.034).


Fatigue, tiredness, lack of energy, and sleepiness in multiple sclerosis patients referred for clinical polysomnography.

Braley TJ, Chervin RD, Segal BM - Mult Scler Int (2012)

Frequencies of Likert responses for problematic sleepiness (a), fatigue (b), tiredness (c), and lack of energy (d) among MS patients (group 1) and matched controls (group 0). 1 = “never;” 2 = “seldom;” 3 = “occasionally;” 4 = “often;” and 5 = “almost always”.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3539354&req=5

fig1: Frequencies of Likert responses for problematic sleepiness (a), fatigue (b), tiredness (c), and lack of energy (d) among MS patients (group 1) and matched controls (group 0). 1 = “never;” 2 = “seldom;” 3 = “occasionally;” 4 = “often;” and 5 = “almost always”.
Mentions: Response rates to categorical UMSIA items and distribution of symptom frequencies for MS patients and matched controls are shown in Figure 1. When responses were dichotomized, significantly more MS patients than controls reported fatigue, tiredness, and lack of energy to occur often or almost always (90% versus 18%, 77% versus 0%, and 90% versus 7%; Chi-square P < 0.0001 for each). Conversely, frequent sleepiness as per the UMSIA was reported similarly by both groups (53% versus 65%; P = 0.3409). There were strong correlations between fatigue, tiredness, and lack of energy in both groups (Table 2). Among MS patients, tiredness correlated with sleepiness, (rho = 0.50; P = 0.005), and a trend emerged toward a significant correlation between fatigue and sleepiness (rho = 0.33; P = 0.076). Among controls, fatigue correlated with sleepiness (rho = 0.45; P = 0.034).

Bottom Line: Objectives.Results.Conclusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Sleep Disorders Center, and Holtom-Garrett Program in Neuroimmunology, University of Michigan, C728 Med-Inn Building, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.

ABSTRACT
Objectives. To assess the relationship between nocturnal polysomnographic (PSG) findings and a group of key self-reported symptoms-fatigue, tiredness, lack of energy, and sleepiness-among sleep-laboratory referred patients with and without multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods. PSG and questionnaire data from n = 30 MS patients and n = 30 matched controls were analyzed retrospectively. Associations between symptoms of fatigue, tiredness, lack of energy, sleepiness, and PSG variables of interest were examined among MS patients and controls. Results. More MS patients than controls reported fatigue, tiredness, and lack of energy to occur often or almost always (Chi-square P < 0.0001 for each), but sleepiness was reported similarly by both groups (P = 0.3409). Among MS patients, tiredness correlated with sleepiness (Spearman correlation P = 0.005), and a trend emerged toward correlation between fatigue and sleepiness (Spearman correlation P = 0.076). Decreased sleep efficiency on PSGs correlated with fatigue, tiredness, and lack of energy in MS patients (Spearman correlation P = 0.002, 0.029, and 0.048, resp.), but not sleepiness or any symptom among controls. Conclusion. In comparison to controls, MS patients report more fatigue, tiredness, and lack energy, but not sleepiness. Fatigue and related symptoms may arise from MS itself or in relation to reduced sleep efficiency.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus