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Walking training with foot drop stimulator controlled by a tilt sensor to improve walking outcomes: a randomized controlled pilot study in patients with stroke in subacute phase.

Morone G, Fusco A, Di Capua P, Coiro P, Pratesi L - Stroke Res Treat (2012)

Bottom Line: In terms of mobility and force, ameliorations were recorded, even if not significant (Rivermead Mobility Index: P = 0.057; Manual Muscle Test: P = 0.059).Similar changes between groups were observed for independence in activities of daily living, neurological assessments, and spasticity reduction.These results highlight the potential efficacy for patients affected by a droop foot of a walking training performed with a neurostimulator in subacute phase.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinical Laboratory of Experimental Neurorehabilitation, I.R.C.C.S., Santa Lucia Foundation, Via Ardeatina 306, 00179 Rome, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Foot drop is a quite common problem in nervous system disorders. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has showed to be an alternative approach to correct foot drop improving walking ability in patients with stroke. In this study, twenty patients with stroke in subacute phase were enrolled and randomly divided in two groups: one group performing the NMES (i.e. Walkaide Group, WG) and the Control Group (CG) performing conventional neuromotor rehabilitation. Both groups underwent the same amount of treatment time. Significant improvements of walking speed were recorded for WG (168 ± 39%) than for CG (129 ± 29%, P = 0.032) as well as in terms of locomotion (Functional Ambulation Classification score: P = 0.023). In terms of mobility and force, ameliorations were recorded, even if not significant (Rivermead Mobility Index: P = 0.057; Manual Muscle Test: P = 0.059). Similar changes between groups were observed for independence in activities of daily living, neurological assessments, and spasticity reduction. These results highlight the potential efficacy for patients affected by a droop foot of a walking training performed with a neurostimulator in subacute phase.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effectiveness for control group (CG) and Walkaide group (WG) in terms of FAC (filled circles), BI (empty circles), RMI (empty squares), MRC (filled rhombus), and CNS (filled squares) scores with the relevant P values of comparison between groups.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig2: Effectiveness for control group (CG) and Walkaide group (WG) in terms of FAC (filled circles), BI (empty circles), RMI (empty squares), MRC (filled rhombus), and CNS (filled squares) scores with the relevant P values of comparison between groups.

Mentions: All these measures, but Ashworth-score, were significantly improved after treatment in both the groups, as detailed in Table 1. Between-group analysis showed that the effectiveness resulted higher in WG than in CG for all the five secondary outcome measures (Figure 2). These differences were statistically significant for FAC-score, and close to the significant threshold for RMI- and MRC-scores.


Walking training with foot drop stimulator controlled by a tilt sensor to improve walking outcomes: a randomized controlled pilot study in patients with stroke in subacute phase.

Morone G, Fusco A, Di Capua P, Coiro P, Pratesi L - Stroke Res Treat (2012)

Effectiveness for control group (CG) and Walkaide group (WG) in terms of FAC (filled circles), BI (empty circles), RMI (empty squares), MRC (filled rhombus), and CNS (filled squares) scores with the relevant P values of comparison between groups.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3539353&req=5

fig2: Effectiveness for control group (CG) and Walkaide group (WG) in terms of FAC (filled circles), BI (empty circles), RMI (empty squares), MRC (filled rhombus), and CNS (filled squares) scores with the relevant P values of comparison between groups.
Mentions: All these measures, but Ashworth-score, were significantly improved after treatment in both the groups, as detailed in Table 1. Between-group analysis showed that the effectiveness resulted higher in WG than in CG for all the five secondary outcome measures (Figure 2). These differences were statistically significant for FAC-score, and close to the significant threshold for RMI- and MRC-scores.

Bottom Line: In terms of mobility and force, ameliorations were recorded, even if not significant (Rivermead Mobility Index: P = 0.057; Manual Muscle Test: P = 0.059).Similar changes between groups were observed for independence in activities of daily living, neurological assessments, and spasticity reduction.These results highlight the potential efficacy for patients affected by a droop foot of a walking training performed with a neurostimulator in subacute phase.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinical Laboratory of Experimental Neurorehabilitation, I.R.C.C.S., Santa Lucia Foundation, Via Ardeatina 306, 00179 Rome, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Foot drop is a quite common problem in nervous system disorders. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has showed to be an alternative approach to correct foot drop improving walking ability in patients with stroke. In this study, twenty patients with stroke in subacute phase were enrolled and randomly divided in two groups: one group performing the NMES (i.e. Walkaide Group, WG) and the Control Group (CG) performing conventional neuromotor rehabilitation. Both groups underwent the same amount of treatment time. Significant improvements of walking speed were recorded for WG (168 ± 39%) than for CG (129 ± 29%, P = 0.032) as well as in terms of locomotion (Functional Ambulation Classification score: P = 0.023). In terms of mobility and force, ameliorations were recorded, even if not significant (Rivermead Mobility Index: P = 0.057; Manual Muscle Test: P = 0.059). Similar changes between groups were observed for independence in activities of daily living, neurological assessments, and spasticity reduction. These results highlight the potential efficacy for patients affected by a droop foot of a walking training performed with a neurostimulator in subacute phase.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus