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The influence of shyness on the scanning of own- and other-race faces in adults.

Wang Q, Hu C, Short LA, Fu G - PLoS ONE (2012)

Bottom Line: We found that: (1) Participants' shyness scores were negatively correlated with the fixation proportion on the eyes, regardless of the race of face they viewed.The shyer the participants were, the less time they spent fixating on the eye region; (2) High shyness participants tended to fixate significantly more than low shyness participants on the regions just below the eyes as if to avoid direct eye contact; (3) When participants were recognizing own-race faces, their shyness scores were positively correlated with the normalized criterion.The present results support an avoidance hypothesis of shyness, suggesting that shy individuals tend to avoid directly fixating on others' eyes, regardless of face race.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua, Zhejiang, China.

ABSTRACT
The current study explored the relationship between shyness and face scanning patterns for own- and other-race faces in adults. Participants completed a shyness inventory and a face recognition task in which their eye movements were recorded by a Tobii 1750 eye tracker. We found that: (1) Participants' shyness scores were negatively correlated with the fixation proportion on the eyes, regardless of the race of face they viewed. The shyer the participants were, the less time they spent fixating on the eye region; (2) High shyness participants tended to fixate significantly more than low shyness participants on the regions just below the eyes as if to avoid direct eye contact; (3) When participants were recognizing own-race faces, their shyness scores were positively correlated with the normalized criterion. The shyer they were, the more apt they were to judge the faces as novel, regardless of whether they were target or foil faces. The present results support an avoidance hypothesis of shyness, suggesting that shy individuals tend to avoid directly fixating on others' eyes, regardless of face race.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Correlation between shyness and proportion of time spent looking at the eyes during recognition.Scatter plot illustrating the correlation between level of shyness and the proportion of time spent looking at the eyes in the recognition phase across all three face races.
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pone-0052203-g006: Correlation between shyness and proportion of time spent looking at the eyes during recognition.Scatter plot illustrating the correlation between level of shyness and the proportion of time spent looking at the eyes in the recognition phase across all three face races.

Mentions: A Pearson correlation analysis revealed that the fixation proportion on the eyes was negatively correlated with participants’ shyness scores when participants were learning, reviewing, or recognizing all three face races. Shyness scores were significantly correlated with fixation proportion on the eyes for Chinese faces in the learning and reviewing phase (r = −.40, p<.05), Chinese faces in the recognition phase (r = −.37, p<.05), South Asian faces in the learning and reviewing phase (r = −.51, p<.01), South Asian faces in the recognition phase (r = −.42, p<.05), African-American faces in the learning and reviewing phase (r = −.44, p<.05), and African-American faces in the recognition phase (r = −.44, p<.05). Overall, the higher a participant’s shyness score, the less he or she looked at the eyes. When all three face races were collectively examined, the correlation between participants’ shyness scores and fixation proportion on the eyes was significant both in the learning and reviewing phase, r = −.47, p<.05 (Figure 5), and in the recognition phase, r = −.43, p<.05 (Figure 6).


The influence of shyness on the scanning of own- and other-race faces in adults.

Wang Q, Hu C, Short LA, Fu G - PLoS ONE (2012)

Correlation between shyness and proportion of time spent looking at the eyes during recognition.Scatter plot illustrating the correlation between level of shyness and the proportion of time spent looking at the eyes in the recognition phase across all three face races.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3526596&req=5

pone-0052203-g006: Correlation between shyness and proportion of time spent looking at the eyes during recognition.Scatter plot illustrating the correlation between level of shyness and the proportion of time spent looking at the eyes in the recognition phase across all three face races.
Mentions: A Pearson correlation analysis revealed that the fixation proportion on the eyes was negatively correlated with participants’ shyness scores when participants were learning, reviewing, or recognizing all three face races. Shyness scores were significantly correlated with fixation proportion on the eyes for Chinese faces in the learning and reviewing phase (r = −.40, p<.05), Chinese faces in the recognition phase (r = −.37, p<.05), South Asian faces in the learning and reviewing phase (r = −.51, p<.01), South Asian faces in the recognition phase (r = −.42, p<.05), African-American faces in the learning and reviewing phase (r = −.44, p<.05), and African-American faces in the recognition phase (r = −.44, p<.05). Overall, the higher a participant’s shyness score, the less he or she looked at the eyes. When all three face races were collectively examined, the correlation between participants’ shyness scores and fixation proportion on the eyes was significant both in the learning and reviewing phase, r = −.47, p<.05 (Figure 5), and in the recognition phase, r = −.43, p<.05 (Figure 6).

Bottom Line: We found that: (1) Participants' shyness scores were negatively correlated with the fixation proportion on the eyes, regardless of the race of face they viewed.The shyer the participants were, the less time they spent fixating on the eye region; (2) High shyness participants tended to fixate significantly more than low shyness participants on the regions just below the eyes as if to avoid direct eye contact; (3) When participants were recognizing own-race faces, their shyness scores were positively correlated with the normalized criterion.The present results support an avoidance hypothesis of shyness, suggesting that shy individuals tend to avoid directly fixating on others' eyes, regardless of face race.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua, Zhejiang, China.

ABSTRACT
The current study explored the relationship between shyness and face scanning patterns for own- and other-race faces in adults. Participants completed a shyness inventory and a face recognition task in which their eye movements were recorded by a Tobii 1750 eye tracker. We found that: (1) Participants' shyness scores were negatively correlated with the fixation proportion on the eyes, regardless of the race of face they viewed. The shyer the participants were, the less time they spent fixating on the eye region; (2) High shyness participants tended to fixate significantly more than low shyness participants on the regions just below the eyes as if to avoid direct eye contact; (3) When participants were recognizing own-race faces, their shyness scores were positively correlated with the normalized criterion. The shyer they were, the more apt they were to judge the faces as novel, regardless of whether they were target or foil faces. The present results support an avoidance hypothesis of shyness, suggesting that shy individuals tend to avoid directly fixating on others' eyes, regardless of face race.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus