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Oral doxycycline reduces pterygium lesions; results from a double blind, randomized, placebo controlled clinical trial.

Rúa O, Larráyoz IM, Barajas MT, Velilla S, Martínez A - PLoS ONE (2012)

Bottom Line: The primary endpoint was not met for the whole population but subgroup analysis showed that doxycycline was effective in patients of Caucasian origin while other ethnicities, mostly Hispanic, did not respond to the treatment.Moreover, there was a correlation between age and better response (p = 0.003).Oral doxycycline was superior to placebo for the treatment of primary pterygia in older Caucasian patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ophthalmology Service, Hospital San Pedro, Logroño, Spain.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To determine whether oral doxycycline treatment reduces pterygium lesions.

Design: Double blind, randomized, placebo controlled clinical trial.

Participants: 98 adult patients with primary pterygium.

Methods: Patients were randomly assigned to receive 100 mg oral doxycycline twice a day (49 subjects), or placebo (49 subjects), for 30 days. Photographs of the lesion were taken at the time of recruitment and at the end of the treatment. Follow-up sessions were performed 6 and 12 months post-treatment. Statistical analyses for both continuous and categorical variables were applied. p values of less than 0.05 were considered to indicate statistical significance.

Main outcome measures: The primary endpoint was the change in lesion size after 30 days of treatment.

Results: The primary endpoint was not met for the whole population but subgroup analysis showed that doxycycline was effective in patients of Caucasian origin while other ethnicities, mostly Hispanic, did not respond to the treatment. Moreover, there was a correlation between age and better response (p = 0.003). Adverse events were uncommon, mild, and in agreement with previous reports on short doxycycline treatments.

Conclusions: Oral doxycycline was superior to placebo for the treatment of primary pterygia in older Caucasian patients. These findings support the use of doxycycline for pterygium treatment in particular populations.

Trial registration: European Union Clinical Trials Register EudraCT 2008-007178-39.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Photographs of the eye of patient number 20 (male, 61 year-old, Caucasian) before (A) and after (B) the treatment with doxycycline for 30 days.A clear reduction of the lesion's size can be appreciated, from 5.44 mm2 to 3.95 mm2.
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pone-0052696-g002: Photographs of the eye of patient number 20 (male, 61 year-old, Caucasian) before (A) and after (B) the treatment with doxycycline for 30 days.A clear reduction of the lesion's size can be appreciated, from 5.44 mm2 to 3.95 mm2.

Mentions: Photographs of the pterygium lesions were taken in the first two visits (Fig. 2). After a month of treatment, the overall data showed that pterygia that had been treated with oral doxycycline experimented a relative change (size measured in the second visit divided by size in the first visit) of 0.98±0.05, whereas in those receiving placebo the relative change was 1.01±0.03. These differences were not statistically significant when analyzing either the per-protocol (p = 0.225) or the intention-to-treat (p = 0.191) populations (Student's t test).


Oral doxycycline reduces pterygium lesions; results from a double blind, randomized, placebo controlled clinical trial.

Rúa O, Larráyoz IM, Barajas MT, Velilla S, Martínez A - PLoS ONE (2012)

Photographs of the eye of patient number 20 (male, 61 year-old, Caucasian) before (A) and after (B) the treatment with doxycycline for 30 days.A clear reduction of the lesion's size can be appreciated, from 5.44 mm2 to 3.95 mm2.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3526544&req=5

pone-0052696-g002: Photographs of the eye of patient number 20 (male, 61 year-old, Caucasian) before (A) and after (B) the treatment with doxycycline for 30 days.A clear reduction of the lesion's size can be appreciated, from 5.44 mm2 to 3.95 mm2.
Mentions: Photographs of the pterygium lesions were taken in the first two visits (Fig. 2). After a month of treatment, the overall data showed that pterygia that had been treated with oral doxycycline experimented a relative change (size measured in the second visit divided by size in the first visit) of 0.98±0.05, whereas in those receiving placebo the relative change was 1.01±0.03. These differences were not statistically significant when analyzing either the per-protocol (p = 0.225) or the intention-to-treat (p = 0.191) populations (Student's t test).

Bottom Line: The primary endpoint was not met for the whole population but subgroup analysis showed that doxycycline was effective in patients of Caucasian origin while other ethnicities, mostly Hispanic, did not respond to the treatment.Moreover, there was a correlation between age and better response (p = 0.003).Oral doxycycline was superior to placebo for the treatment of primary pterygia in older Caucasian patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ophthalmology Service, Hospital San Pedro, Logroño, Spain.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To determine whether oral doxycycline treatment reduces pterygium lesions.

Design: Double blind, randomized, placebo controlled clinical trial.

Participants: 98 adult patients with primary pterygium.

Methods: Patients were randomly assigned to receive 100 mg oral doxycycline twice a day (49 subjects), or placebo (49 subjects), for 30 days. Photographs of the lesion were taken at the time of recruitment and at the end of the treatment. Follow-up sessions were performed 6 and 12 months post-treatment. Statistical analyses for both continuous and categorical variables were applied. p values of less than 0.05 were considered to indicate statistical significance.

Main outcome measures: The primary endpoint was the change in lesion size after 30 days of treatment.

Results: The primary endpoint was not met for the whole population but subgroup analysis showed that doxycycline was effective in patients of Caucasian origin while other ethnicities, mostly Hispanic, did not respond to the treatment. Moreover, there was a correlation between age and better response (p = 0.003). Adverse events were uncommon, mild, and in agreement with previous reports on short doxycycline treatments.

Conclusions: Oral doxycycline was superior to placebo for the treatment of primary pterygia in older Caucasian patients. These findings support the use of doxycycline for pterygium treatment in particular populations.

Trial registration: European Union Clinical Trials Register EudraCT 2008-007178-39.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus