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An analysis of the alleged skeletal remains of Carin Göring.

Kjellström A, Edlund H, Lembring M, Ahlgren V, Allen M - PLoS ONE (2012)

Bottom Line: In 1991, treasure hunters found skeletal remains in an area close to the destroyed country residence of former Nazi leader Hermann Göring in northeastern Berlin.The mtDNA sequence found in the ulna, the cranium and the reference sample is, thus, very common among Europeans.The remains as well as a sample from Carin's son were successfully analysed for the three nuclear markers TH01, D7S820 and D8S1179.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.

ABSTRACT
In 1991, treasure hunters found skeletal remains in an area close to the destroyed country residence of former Nazi leader Hermann Göring in northeastern Berlin. The remains, which were believed to belong to Carin Göring, who was buried at the site, were examined to determine whether it was possible to make a positive identification. The anthropological analysis showed that the remains come from an adult woman. The DNA analysis of several bone elements showed female sex, and a reference sample from Carin's son revealed mtDNA sequences identical to the remains. The profile has one nucleotide difference from the Cambridge reference sequence (rCRS), the common variant 263G. A database search resulted in a frequency of this mtDNA sequence of about 10% out of more than 7,000 European haplotypes. The mtDNA sequence found in the ulna, the cranium and the reference sample is, thus, very common among Europeans. Therefore, nuclear DNA analysis was attempted. The remains as well as a sample from Carin's son were successfully analysed for the three nuclear markers TH01, D7S820 and D8S1179. The nuclear DNA analysis of the two samples revealed one shared allele for each of the three markers, supporting a mother and son relationship. This genetic information together with anthropological and historical files provides an additional piece of circumstantial evidence in our efforts to identify the remains of Carin Göring.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Photograph showing thoracic vertebra trauma.
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pone-0044366-g002: Photograph showing thoracic vertebra trauma.

Mentions: One of the thoracic vertebrae (T6-T8?) shows sign of a V-shaped trauma on the superior surface of the body (Figure 2). The fracture radiates from the centre and terminates at the vertebral rim. The posterior fracture edge is pressed into the body and below the anterior fracture edge. The character of the cancellous bone renders the edges irregular, making it difficult to distinguish whether it was a perimortem or postmortem fracture. Centrally on the endocranial surface close to the frontal crest of the frontal bone a thickened area with one large (10×5 mm) and two minor (5×5 mm) dense, protruding, round nodules with discrete margins was observed (Figure 3). The largest nodule, located on the left side of the frontal crest, protruded approximately 4 mm. The surface of the thickened area is smooth, but the endocranial tabula exhibits clusters of swollen billows superior to the nodules, foremost close to the right side of the coronal suture. The outer table exhibits no pathological changes.


An analysis of the alleged skeletal remains of Carin Göring.

Kjellström A, Edlund H, Lembring M, Ahlgren V, Allen M - PLoS ONE (2012)

Photograph showing thoracic vertebra trauma.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3526542&req=5

pone-0044366-g002: Photograph showing thoracic vertebra trauma.
Mentions: One of the thoracic vertebrae (T6-T8?) shows sign of a V-shaped trauma on the superior surface of the body (Figure 2). The fracture radiates from the centre and terminates at the vertebral rim. The posterior fracture edge is pressed into the body and below the anterior fracture edge. The character of the cancellous bone renders the edges irregular, making it difficult to distinguish whether it was a perimortem or postmortem fracture. Centrally on the endocranial surface close to the frontal crest of the frontal bone a thickened area with one large (10×5 mm) and two minor (5×5 mm) dense, protruding, round nodules with discrete margins was observed (Figure 3). The largest nodule, located on the left side of the frontal crest, protruded approximately 4 mm. The surface of the thickened area is smooth, but the endocranial tabula exhibits clusters of swollen billows superior to the nodules, foremost close to the right side of the coronal suture. The outer table exhibits no pathological changes.

Bottom Line: In 1991, treasure hunters found skeletal remains in an area close to the destroyed country residence of former Nazi leader Hermann Göring in northeastern Berlin.The mtDNA sequence found in the ulna, the cranium and the reference sample is, thus, very common among Europeans.The remains as well as a sample from Carin's son were successfully analysed for the three nuclear markers TH01, D7S820 and D8S1179.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.

ABSTRACT
In 1991, treasure hunters found skeletal remains in an area close to the destroyed country residence of former Nazi leader Hermann Göring in northeastern Berlin. The remains, which were believed to belong to Carin Göring, who was buried at the site, were examined to determine whether it was possible to make a positive identification. The anthropological analysis showed that the remains come from an adult woman. The DNA analysis of several bone elements showed female sex, and a reference sample from Carin's son revealed mtDNA sequences identical to the remains. The profile has one nucleotide difference from the Cambridge reference sequence (rCRS), the common variant 263G. A database search resulted in a frequency of this mtDNA sequence of about 10% out of more than 7,000 European haplotypes. The mtDNA sequence found in the ulna, the cranium and the reference sample is, thus, very common among Europeans. Therefore, nuclear DNA analysis was attempted. The remains as well as a sample from Carin's son were successfully analysed for the three nuclear markers TH01, D7S820 and D8S1179. The nuclear DNA analysis of the two samples revealed one shared allele for each of the three markers, supporting a mother and son relationship. This genetic information together with anthropological and historical files provides an additional piece of circumstantial evidence in our efforts to identify the remains of Carin Göring.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus