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An analysis of the alleged skeletal remains of Carin Göring.

Kjellström A, Edlund H, Lembring M, Ahlgren V, Allen M - PLoS ONE (2012)

Bottom Line: In 1991, treasure hunters found skeletal remains in an area close to the destroyed country residence of former Nazi leader Hermann Göring in northeastern Berlin.The mtDNA sequence found in the ulna, the cranium and the reference sample is, thus, very common among Europeans.The remains as well as a sample from Carin's son were successfully analysed for the three nuclear markers TH01, D7S820 and D8S1179.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.

ABSTRACT
In 1991, treasure hunters found skeletal remains in an area close to the destroyed country residence of former Nazi leader Hermann Göring in northeastern Berlin. The remains, which were believed to belong to Carin Göring, who was buried at the site, were examined to determine whether it was possible to make a positive identification. The anthropological analysis showed that the remains come from an adult woman. The DNA analysis of several bone elements showed female sex, and a reference sample from Carin's son revealed mtDNA sequences identical to the remains. The profile has one nucleotide difference from the Cambridge reference sequence (rCRS), the common variant 263G. A database search resulted in a frequency of this mtDNA sequence of about 10% out of more than 7,000 European haplotypes. The mtDNA sequence found in the ulna, the cranium and the reference sample is, thus, very common among Europeans. Therefore, nuclear DNA analysis was attempted. The remains as well as a sample from Carin's son were successfully analysed for the three nuclear markers TH01, D7S820 and D8S1179. The nuclear DNA analysis of the two samples revealed one shared allele for each of the three markers, supporting a mother and son relationship. This genetic information together with anthropological and historical files provides an additional piece of circumstantial evidence in our efforts to identify the remains of Carin Göring.

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Schedule showing preserved elements (in black).
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pone-0044366-g001: Schedule showing preserved elements (in black).

Mentions: In total 26 bones from both the cranium and the upper postcranial body were received from the Sweden National Board of Forensic Medicine (Figure 1 and Table 2). The elements showed different signs of postmortem trauma (e.g., loss of the proximal diaphysis of the humerus) and some surface erosion but were in general firm in character. Based on the facts that all bones were of the same colour, the same elements but from different sides were equivalent in size and shape, and some elements showed a trim articulation – it is likely that they belonged to the same individual. Even though the video from the treasure hunters is of poor quality, similarities are seen between the bones being discovered and excavated in the film with the physical remains analysed in this study. For instance, in the film a humerus, which is broken proximally, is shown, a complete radius is displayed and close-ups are taken of a single frontal bone and an occipital bone. These bone elements demonstrate a close resemblance in character, colour and fragmentation to the analysed remains.


An analysis of the alleged skeletal remains of Carin Göring.

Kjellström A, Edlund H, Lembring M, Ahlgren V, Allen M - PLoS ONE (2012)

Schedule showing preserved elements (in black).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3526542&req=5

pone-0044366-g001: Schedule showing preserved elements (in black).
Mentions: In total 26 bones from both the cranium and the upper postcranial body were received from the Sweden National Board of Forensic Medicine (Figure 1 and Table 2). The elements showed different signs of postmortem trauma (e.g., loss of the proximal diaphysis of the humerus) and some surface erosion but were in general firm in character. Based on the facts that all bones were of the same colour, the same elements but from different sides were equivalent in size and shape, and some elements showed a trim articulation – it is likely that they belonged to the same individual. Even though the video from the treasure hunters is of poor quality, similarities are seen between the bones being discovered and excavated in the film with the physical remains analysed in this study. For instance, in the film a humerus, which is broken proximally, is shown, a complete radius is displayed and close-ups are taken of a single frontal bone and an occipital bone. These bone elements demonstrate a close resemblance in character, colour and fragmentation to the analysed remains.

Bottom Line: In 1991, treasure hunters found skeletal remains in an area close to the destroyed country residence of former Nazi leader Hermann Göring in northeastern Berlin.The mtDNA sequence found in the ulna, the cranium and the reference sample is, thus, very common among Europeans.The remains as well as a sample from Carin's son were successfully analysed for the three nuclear markers TH01, D7S820 and D8S1179.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.

ABSTRACT
In 1991, treasure hunters found skeletal remains in an area close to the destroyed country residence of former Nazi leader Hermann Göring in northeastern Berlin. The remains, which were believed to belong to Carin Göring, who was buried at the site, were examined to determine whether it was possible to make a positive identification. The anthropological analysis showed that the remains come from an adult woman. The DNA analysis of several bone elements showed female sex, and a reference sample from Carin's son revealed mtDNA sequences identical to the remains. The profile has one nucleotide difference from the Cambridge reference sequence (rCRS), the common variant 263G. A database search resulted in a frequency of this mtDNA sequence of about 10% out of more than 7,000 European haplotypes. The mtDNA sequence found in the ulna, the cranium and the reference sample is, thus, very common among Europeans. Therefore, nuclear DNA analysis was attempted. The remains as well as a sample from Carin's son were successfully analysed for the three nuclear markers TH01, D7S820 and D8S1179. The nuclear DNA analysis of the two samples revealed one shared allele for each of the three markers, supporting a mother and son relationship. This genetic information together with anthropological and historical files provides an additional piece of circumstantial evidence in our efforts to identify the remains of Carin Göring.

Show MeSH