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Approaches to integrated monitoring for environmental health impact assessment.

Liu HY, Bartonova A, Pascal M, Smolders R, Skjetne E, Dusinska M - Environ Health (2012)

Bottom Line: Our review showed that most of the existing monitoring programmes have been designed for specific purposes, resulting in narrow scope and limited number of parameters.We define IEHM as 'a systemic process to measure, analyse and interpret the state and changes of natural-eco-anthropogenic systems and its related health impact over time at the same location with causative explanations across the various compartments of the cause-effect chain'.Such a framework allows the development of combined monitoring systems that exhibit a large degree of compatibility between countries and regions.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: NILU - Norwegian Institute for Air Research, Instituttveien 18, 2027, Kjeller, Norway. hyl@nilu.no

ABSTRACT
Although Integrated Environmental Health Monitoring (IEHM) is considered an essential tool to better understand complex environmental health issues, there is no consensus on how to develop such a programme. We reviewed four existing frameworks and eight monitoring programmes in the area of environmental health. We identified the DPSEEA (Driving Force-Pressure-State-Exposure-Effect-Action) framework as most suitable for developing an IEHM programme for environmental health impact assessment. Our review showed that most of the existing monitoring programmes have been designed for specific purposes, resulting in narrow scope and limited number of parameters. This therefore limits their relevance for studying complex environmental health topics. Other challenges include limited spatial and temporal data availability, limited development of data sharing mechanisms, heterogeneous data quality, a lack of adequate methodologies to link disparate data sources, and low level of interdisciplinary cooperation. To overcome some of these challenges, we propose a DPSEEA-based conceptual framework for an IEHM programme that would enable monitoring and measuring the impact of environmental changes on human health. We define IEHM as 'a systemic process to measure, analyse and interpret the state and changes of natural-eco-anthropogenic systems and its related health impact over time at the same location with causative explanations across the various compartments of the cause-effect chain'. We develop a structural work process to integrate information that is based on existing environmental health monitoring programmes. Such a framework allows the development of combined monitoring systems that exhibit a large degree of compatibility between countries and regions.

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A conceptual framework for integrated environmental health monitoring. Driving force-Pressure-State-Exposure-Effect-Action (left box) describes the environmental health chain through the main components (see Additional file2) that an integrated environmental health monitoring could follow as an operational framework. With human health at the core, the main components of an integrated environmental health monitoring framework (right box) are natural systems, man-made systems, ecosystems and human systems. The interconnections between these systems are environmental monitoring, bio-monitoring, eco-surveillance and health surveillance.
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Figure 1: A conceptual framework for integrated environmental health monitoring. Driving force-Pressure-State-Exposure-Effect-Action (left box) describes the environmental health chain through the main components (see Additional file2) that an integrated environmental health monitoring could follow as an operational framework. With human health at the core, the main components of an integrated environmental health monitoring framework (right box) are natural systems, man-made systems, ecosystems and human systems. The interconnections between these systems are environmental monitoring, bio-monitoring, eco-surveillance and health surveillance.

Mentions: The need for integrated environmental health monitoring was recognized more than 10 years ago[31,42]. Yet, until now, there has been no concrete achievement[31,43]. The purpose of developing an IEHM framework (Figure 1) is to: (i) serve as a ‘think model’, so that users can apply it in a specific context and modify it according to their requirements, and (ii) provide a basis for further development of such a framework for a realistic IEHM programme.


Approaches to integrated monitoring for environmental health impact assessment.

Liu HY, Bartonova A, Pascal M, Smolders R, Skjetne E, Dusinska M - Environ Health (2012)

A conceptual framework for integrated environmental health monitoring. Driving force-Pressure-State-Exposure-Effect-Action (left box) describes the environmental health chain through the main components (see Additional file2) that an integrated environmental health monitoring could follow as an operational framework. With human health at the core, the main components of an integrated environmental health monitoring framework (right box) are natural systems, man-made systems, ecosystems and human systems. The interconnections between these systems are environmental monitoring, bio-monitoring, eco-surveillance and health surveillance.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3526392&req=5

Figure 1: A conceptual framework for integrated environmental health monitoring. Driving force-Pressure-State-Exposure-Effect-Action (left box) describes the environmental health chain through the main components (see Additional file2) that an integrated environmental health monitoring could follow as an operational framework. With human health at the core, the main components of an integrated environmental health monitoring framework (right box) are natural systems, man-made systems, ecosystems and human systems. The interconnections between these systems are environmental monitoring, bio-monitoring, eco-surveillance and health surveillance.
Mentions: The need for integrated environmental health monitoring was recognized more than 10 years ago[31,42]. Yet, until now, there has been no concrete achievement[31,43]. The purpose of developing an IEHM framework (Figure 1) is to: (i) serve as a ‘think model’, so that users can apply it in a specific context and modify it according to their requirements, and (ii) provide a basis for further development of such a framework for a realistic IEHM programme.

Bottom Line: Our review showed that most of the existing monitoring programmes have been designed for specific purposes, resulting in narrow scope and limited number of parameters.We define IEHM as 'a systemic process to measure, analyse and interpret the state and changes of natural-eco-anthropogenic systems and its related health impact over time at the same location with causative explanations across the various compartments of the cause-effect chain'.Such a framework allows the development of combined monitoring systems that exhibit a large degree of compatibility between countries and regions.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: NILU - Norwegian Institute for Air Research, Instituttveien 18, 2027, Kjeller, Norway. hyl@nilu.no

ABSTRACT
Although Integrated Environmental Health Monitoring (IEHM) is considered an essential tool to better understand complex environmental health issues, there is no consensus on how to develop such a programme. We reviewed four existing frameworks and eight monitoring programmes in the area of environmental health. We identified the DPSEEA (Driving Force-Pressure-State-Exposure-Effect-Action) framework as most suitable for developing an IEHM programme for environmental health impact assessment. Our review showed that most of the existing monitoring programmes have been designed for specific purposes, resulting in narrow scope and limited number of parameters. This therefore limits their relevance for studying complex environmental health topics. Other challenges include limited spatial and temporal data availability, limited development of data sharing mechanisms, heterogeneous data quality, a lack of adequate methodologies to link disparate data sources, and low level of interdisciplinary cooperation. To overcome some of these challenges, we propose a DPSEEA-based conceptual framework for an IEHM programme that would enable monitoring and measuring the impact of environmental changes on human health. We define IEHM as 'a systemic process to measure, analyse and interpret the state and changes of natural-eco-anthropogenic systems and its related health impact over time at the same location with causative explanations across the various compartments of the cause-effect chain'. We develop a structural work process to integrate information that is based on existing environmental health monitoring programmes. Such a framework allows the development of combined monitoring systems that exhibit a large degree of compatibility between countries and regions.

Show MeSH