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Direct patterning of silver particles on porous silicon by inkjet printing of a silver salt via in-situ reduction.

Chiolerio A, Virga A, Pandolfi P, Martino P, Rivolo P, Geobaldo F, Giorgis F - Nanoscale Res Lett (2012)

Bottom Line: Silver NPs were obtained by p-Si mediated in-situ reduction of Ag+ cations using solutions based on AgNO3 which were directly printed on p-Si according to specific geometries and process parameters.We performed both optical and scanning electron microscopes on the NPs traces, correlating the morphology features with the IjP parameters, giving an insight on the synthesis kinetics.The patterned NPs show good performances as SERS substrates.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Center for Space Human Robotics, Corso Trento 21, Torino, 10129, Italy. alessandro.chiolerio@iit.it.

ABSTRACT
We have developed a method for obtaining a direct pattern of silver nanoparticles (NPs) on porous silicon (p-Si) by means of inkjet printing (IjP) of a silver salt. Silver NPs were obtained by p-Si mediated in-situ reduction of Ag+ cations using solutions based on AgNO3 which were directly printed on p-Si according to specific geometries and process parameters. The main difference with respect to existing literature is that normally, inkjet printing is applied to silver (metal) NP suspensions, while in our experiment the NPs are formed after jetting the solution on the reactive substrate. We performed both optical and scanning electron microscopes on the NPs traces, correlating the morphology features with the IjP parameters, giving an insight on the synthesis kinetics. The patterned NPs show good performances as SERS substrates.

No MeSH data available.


2-D percolation factor for samples obtained with several droplet numbers and ejection frequencies. The data corresponding to different frequencies are vertically shifted for the sake of clarity; the solid lines are guides for the eye, and the dashed lines represent the threshold of complete percolation.
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Figure 5: 2-D percolation factor for samples obtained with several droplet numbers and ejection frequencies. The data corresponding to different frequencies are vertically shifted for the sake of clarity; the solid lines are guides for the eye, and the dashed lines represent the threshold of complete percolation.

Mentions: Figure 5 shows the comparison of the percolation factor for most of the analyzed samples. As is straightforward to observe, for low ejection frequency (i.e., 250 Hz), there is a monotonical change of the nanostructure morphology which means a good control of the Si coverage by Ag NPs. By increasing the ejection frequency, after a certain threshold value concerning with the droplet number, PF oscillates around an average value. Such a threshold disappears for the highest frequencies (2 to 3 kHz), yielding a simple PF oscillation independently on the Ag amount. This does not mean that the nanostructures are no more evolving by increasing the droplet number since PF is a figure of merit dealing with a planar projection of the Ag NPs which tend to cluster also along the axis perpendicular to the p-Si substrate as clearly shown in Figure 4b.


Direct patterning of silver particles on porous silicon by inkjet printing of a silver salt via in-situ reduction.

Chiolerio A, Virga A, Pandolfi P, Martino P, Rivolo P, Geobaldo F, Giorgis F - Nanoscale Res Lett (2012)

2-D percolation factor for samples obtained with several droplet numbers and ejection frequencies. The data corresponding to different frequencies are vertically shifted for the sake of clarity; the solid lines are guides for the eye, and the dashed lines represent the threshold of complete percolation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3526385&req=5

Figure 5: 2-D percolation factor for samples obtained with several droplet numbers and ejection frequencies. The data corresponding to different frequencies are vertically shifted for the sake of clarity; the solid lines are guides for the eye, and the dashed lines represent the threshold of complete percolation.
Mentions: Figure 5 shows the comparison of the percolation factor for most of the analyzed samples. As is straightforward to observe, for low ejection frequency (i.e., 250 Hz), there is a monotonical change of the nanostructure morphology which means a good control of the Si coverage by Ag NPs. By increasing the ejection frequency, after a certain threshold value concerning with the droplet number, PF oscillates around an average value. Such a threshold disappears for the highest frequencies (2 to 3 kHz), yielding a simple PF oscillation independently on the Ag amount. This does not mean that the nanostructures are no more evolving by increasing the droplet number since PF is a figure of merit dealing with a planar projection of the Ag NPs which tend to cluster also along the axis perpendicular to the p-Si substrate as clearly shown in Figure 4b.

Bottom Line: Silver NPs were obtained by p-Si mediated in-situ reduction of Ag+ cations using solutions based on AgNO3 which were directly printed on p-Si according to specific geometries and process parameters.We performed both optical and scanning electron microscopes on the NPs traces, correlating the morphology features with the IjP parameters, giving an insight on the synthesis kinetics.The patterned NPs show good performances as SERS substrates.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Center for Space Human Robotics, Corso Trento 21, Torino, 10129, Italy. alessandro.chiolerio@iit.it.

ABSTRACT
We have developed a method for obtaining a direct pattern of silver nanoparticles (NPs) on porous silicon (p-Si) by means of inkjet printing (IjP) of a silver salt. Silver NPs were obtained by p-Si mediated in-situ reduction of Ag+ cations using solutions based on AgNO3 which were directly printed on p-Si according to specific geometries and process parameters. The main difference with respect to existing literature is that normally, inkjet printing is applied to silver (metal) NP suspensions, while in our experiment the NPs are formed after jetting the solution on the reactive substrate. We performed both optical and scanning electron microscopes on the NPs traces, correlating the morphology features with the IjP parameters, giving an insight on the synthesis kinetics. The patterned NPs show good performances as SERS substrates.

No MeSH data available.