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Inflammatory markers and risk of type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Wang X, Bao W, Liu J, Ouyang YY, Wang D, Rong S, Xiao X, Shan ZL, Zhang Y, Yao P, Liu LG - Diabetes Care (2013)

Bottom Line: The summary risk estimates were pooled using either fixed-effects or random-effects models to incorporate between-study variation.For CRP, the meta-analysis involving 22 cohorts, with a total of 40,735 participants and 5,753 cases, showed that elevated CRP levels were significantly associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes (1.26 [1.16-1.37]), with the absence of publication bias.This meta-analysis provides further evidence that elevated levels of IL-6 and CRP are significantly associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Maternal and Child Health Care, School of Public Health, Shandong University, Jinan, China.

ABSTRACT

Objective: There has been growing evidence that inflammatory markers play a role in the development of type 2 diabetes. We aimed to systematically review prospective studies on the associations of elevated levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP) with increased risk of type 2 diabetes by conducting a meta-analysis.

Research design and methods: A systematic search of the PubMed, EMBASE, ISI Web of Knowledge, and Cochrane Library databases up until 10 February 2012 was conducted to retrieve prospective studies matched to search terms. We used generalized least-squares trend estimation to assess dose-response relationships. The summary risk estimates were pooled using either fixed-effects or random-effects models to incorporate between-study variation.

Results: The meta-analysis, including 10 prospective studies, with a total of 19,709 participants and 4,480 cases, detected a significant dose-response association of IL-6 levels with type 2 diabetes risk (relative risk [RR] 1.31 [95% CI 1.17-1.46]). For CRP, the meta-analysis involving 22 cohorts, with a total of 40,735 participants and 5,753 cases, showed that elevated CRP levels were significantly associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes (1.26 [1.16-1.37]), with the absence of publication bias. Sensitivity and subgroup analyses further supported the associations.

Conclusions: This meta-analysis provides further evidence that elevated levels of IL-6 and CRP are significantly associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Analyses of subgroups relating IL-6 to type 2 diabetes. For sex (proportion of women), sample size, and duration of follow-up, the P value was obtained by modeling these variables as continuous variables in meta-regression analysis.
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Figure 2: Analyses of subgroups relating IL-6 to type 2 diabetes. For sex (proportion of women), sample size, and duration of follow-up, the P value was obtained by modeling these variables as continuous variables in meta-regression analysis.

Mentions: To test the robustness of our results, we conducted subgroup analyses. Figure 2 shows the results of the analyses of all subgroups at the IL-6 level. The association between elevated levels of IL-6 and diabetes risk was consistently observed in studies from the U.S. and Europe. However, data from two studies in Aboriginal populations suggested that IL-6 did not predict diabetes (RR 0.92 [95% CI 0.72–1.19]; P = 0.531). In subgroup analyses by sex, IL-6 was significantly associated with an increased risk of diabetes in both women and men.


Inflammatory markers and risk of type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Wang X, Bao W, Liu J, Ouyang YY, Wang D, Rong S, Xiao X, Shan ZL, Zhang Y, Yao P, Liu LG - Diabetes Care (2013)

Analyses of subgroups relating IL-6 to type 2 diabetes. For sex (proportion of women), sample size, and duration of follow-up, the P value was obtained by modeling these variables as continuous variables in meta-regression analysis.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3526249&req=5

Figure 2: Analyses of subgroups relating IL-6 to type 2 diabetes. For sex (proportion of women), sample size, and duration of follow-up, the P value was obtained by modeling these variables as continuous variables in meta-regression analysis.
Mentions: To test the robustness of our results, we conducted subgroup analyses. Figure 2 shows the results of the analyses of all subgroups at the IL-6 level. The association between elevated levels of IL-6 and diabetes risk was consistently observed in studies from the U.S. and Europe. However, data from two studies in Aboriginal populations suggested that IL-6 did not predict diabetes (RR 0.92 [95% CI 0.72–1.19]; P = 0.531). In subgroup analyses by sex, IL-6 was significantly associated with an increased risk of diabetes in both women and men.

Bottom Line: The summary risk estimates were pooled using either fixed-effects or random-effects models to incorporate between-study variation.For CRP, the meta-analysis involving 22 cohorts, with a total of 40,735 participants and 5,753 cases, showed that elevated CRP levels were significantly associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes (1.26 [1.16-1.37]), with the absence of publication bias.This meta-analysis provides further evidence that elevated levels of IL-6 and CRP are significantly associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Maternal and Child Health Care, School of Public Health, Shandong University, Jinan, China.

ABSTRACT

Objective: There has been growing evidence that inflammatory markers play a role in the development of type 2 diabetes. We aimed to systematically review prospective studies on the associations of elevated levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP) with increased risk of type 2 diabetes by conducting a meta-analysis.

Research design and methods: A systematic search of the PubMed, EMBASE, ISI Web of Knowledge, and Cochrane Library databases up until 10 February 2012 was conducted to retrieve prospective studies matched to search terms. We used generalized least-squares trend estimation to assess dose-response relationships. The summary risk estimates were pooled using either fixed-effects or random-effects models to incorporate between-study variation.

Results: The meta-analysis, including 10 prospective studies, with a total of 19,709 participants and 4,480 cases, detected a significant dose-response association of IL-6 levels with type 2 diabetes risk (relative risk [RR] 1.31 [95% CI 1.17-1.46]). For CRP, the meta-analysis involving 22 cohorts, with a total of 40,735 participants and 5,753 cases, showed that elevated CRP levels were significantly associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes (1.26 [1.16-1.37]), with the absence of publication bias. Sensitivity and subgroup analyses further supported the associations.

Conclusions: This meta-analysis provides further evidence that elevated levels of IL-6 and CRP are significantly associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus