Limits...
β-cell mass and turnover in humans: effects of obesity and aging.

Saisho Y, Butler AE, Manesso E, Elashoff D, Rizza RA, Butler PC - Diabetes Care (2012)

Bottom Line: We examined human autopsy pancreas from 167 nondiabetic individuals 20-102 years of age.The effect of obesity on β-cell mass was examined in 53 lean and 61 obese subjects, and the effect of aging was examined in 106 lean subjects. β-Cell mass is increased by ~50% with obesity (from 0.8 to 1.2 g).With advanced aging, the exocrine pancreas undergoes atrophy but β-cell mass is remarkably preserved.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Larry L. Hillblom Islet Research Center, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objective: We sought to establish β-cell mass, β-cell apoptosis, and β-cell replication in humans in response to obesity and advanced age.

Research design and methods: We examined human autopsy pancreas from 167 nondiabetic individuals 20-102 years of age. The effect of obesity on β-cell mass was examined in 53 lean and 61 obese subjects, and the effect of aging was examined in 106 lean subjects.

Results: β-Cell mass is increased by ~50% with obesity (from 0.8 to 1.2 g). With advanced aging, the exocrine pancreas undergoes atrophy but β-cell mass is remarkably preserved. There is minimal β-cell replication or apoptosis in lean humans throughout life with no detectable changes with obesity or advanced age.

Conclusions: β-Cell mass in human obesity increases by ~50% by an increase in β-cell number, the source of which is unknown. β-Cell mass is well preserved in humans with advanced aging.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Pancreatic fractional β-cell area (A) and computed β-cell mass (B) in lean nondiabetic subjects from 20 to 100 years of age. Pancreatic fractional β-cell area increased with age (A), but when β-cell mass was calculated from pancreatic parenchyma (Supplementary Fig. 1), β-cell mass remained constant to advanced age (B). The mean individual β-cell cross-sectional area (C) and β-cell nuclear diameter (D) both increased with age.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3526241&req=5

Figure 4: Pancreatic fractional β-cell area (A) and computed β-cell mass (B) in lean nondiabetic subjects from 20 to 100 years of age. Pancreatic fractional β-cell area increased with age (A), but when β-cell mass was calculated from pancreatic parenchyma (Supplementary Fig. 1), β-cell mass remained constant to advanced age (B). The mean individual β-cell cross-sectional area (C) and β-cell nuclear diameter (D) both increased with age.

Mentions: The most striking change in pancreas morphology with advanced age is atrophy of the exocrine pancreas with relative increasing fibrosis and fat accumulation (increased fat-to-acinar ratio) (Fig. 1). However, in contrast to the exocrine pancreas, islet structure is relatively maintained with advanced age in human pancreas. As a result, the fractional β-cell area increases with advanced age (r = 0.3, P < 0.01) (Fig. 4). There is no sex difference in the fractional β-cell area with aging (2.0 ± 0.2 vs. 2.2 ± 0.3% in males and females 60 years of age and over, P = 0.5). Despite the exocrine atrophy with advanced age, the calculated β-cell mass remained constant from 20 to 100 years of age (Fig. 4). Although there was no significant change in β-cell size with aging, the mean β-cell nuclear diameter increased with age (r = 0.6, P < 0.0001) (Fig. 4).


β-cell mass and turnover in humans: effects of obesity and aging.

Saisho Y, Butler AE, Manesso E, Elashoff D, Rizza RA, Butler PC - Diabetes Care (2012)

Pancreatic fractional β-cell area (A) and computed β-cell mass (B) in lean nondiabetic subjects from 20 to 100 years of age. Pancreatic fractional β-cell area increased with age (A), but when β-cell mass was calculated from pancreatic parenchyma (Supplementary Fig. 1), β-cell mass remained constant to advanced age (B). The mean individual β-cell cross-sectional area (C) and β-cell nuclear diameter (D) both increased with age.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3526241&req=5

Figure 4: Pancreatic fractional β-cell area (A) and computed β-cell mass (B) in lean nondiabetic subjects from 20 to 100 years of age. Pancreatic fractional β-cell area increased with age (A), but when β-cell mass was calculated from pancreatic parenchyma (Supplementary Fig. 1), β-cell mass remained constant to advanced age (B). The mean individual β-cell cross-sectional area (C) and β-cell nuclear diameter (D) both increased with age.
Mentions: The most striking change in pancreas morphology with advanced age is atrophy of the exocrine pancreas with relative increasing fibrosis and fat accumulation (increased fat-to-acinar ratio) (Fig. 1). However, in contrast to the exocrine pancreas, islet structure is relatively maintained with advanced age in human pancreas. As a result, the fractional β-cell area increases with advanced age (r = 0.3, P < 0.01) (Fig. 4). There is no sex difference in the fractional β-cell area with aging (2.0 ± 0.2 vs. 2.2 ± 0.3% in males and females 60 years of age and over, P = 0.5). Despite the exocrine atrophy with advanced age, the calculated β-cell mass remained constant from 20 to 100 years of age (Fig. 4). Although there was no significant change in β-cell size with aging, the mean β-cell nuclear diameter increased with age (r = 0.6, P < 0.0001) (Fig. 4).

Bottom Line: We examined human autopsy pancreas from 167 nondiabetic individuals 20-102 years of age.The effect of obesity on β-cell mass was examined in 53 lean and 61 obese subjects, and the effect of aging was examined in 106 lean subjects. β-Cell mass is increased by ~50% with obesity (from 0.8 to 1.2 g).With advanced aging, the exocrine pancreas undergoes atrophy but β-cell mass is remarkably preserved.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Larry L. Hillblom Islet Research Center, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objective: We sought to establish β-cell mass, β-cell apoptosis, and β-cell replication in humans in response to obesity and advanced age.

Research design and methods: We examined human autopsy pancreas from 167 nondiabetic individuals 20-102 years of age. The effect of obesity on β-cell mass was examined in 53 lean and 61 obese subjects, and the effect of aging was examined in 106 lean subjects.

Results: β-Cell mass is increased by ~50% with obesity (from 0.8 to 1.2 g). With advanced aging, the exocrine pancreas undergoes atrophy but β-cell mass is remarkably preserved. There is minimal β-cell replication or apoptosis in lean humans throughout life with no detectable changes with obesity or advanced age.

Conclusions: β-Cell mass in human obesity increases by ~50% by an increase in β-cell number, the source of which is unknown. β-Cell mass is well preserved in humans with advanced aging.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus