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Population-based study of high plasma C-reactive protein concentrations among the Inuit of Nunavik.

Labonté ME, Dewailly E, Chateau-Degat ML, Couture P, Lamarche B - Int J Circumpolar Health (2012)

Bottom Line: Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that every 1 mmHg increase in systolic BP was associated with a 3% increase in the odds of having hs-CRP concentrations ≥ 2 mg/L in the Inuit population (95% CI 1.01-1.04).The combination of older age (≥ 50 vs. <30 years) and elevated waist circumference (gender-specific cut-off values) in a multivariate logistic model was also associated with a 13.3-fold increase in the odds of having plasma hs-CRP concentrations ≥ 2 mg/L (95% CI 5.8-30.9).Sex, age, waist circumference and systolic BP are major factors that increase the risk of this inflammatory phenotype among Inuit from Nunavik, despite their different lifestyle background compared with Caucasians.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods, Laval University, Québec, QC, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Background: The shift away from traditional lifestyle in the Inuit population over the past few decades has been associated with an increased prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors such as obesity, high blood pressure (BP) and diabetes. However, the impact of this transition on the pro-inflammatory marker high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) has not been documented.

Objectives: To examine the prevalence of elevated plasma hs-CRP concentrations in Inuit from Nunavik in the province of Quebec (Canada) and identify anthropometric, biochemical and lifestyle risk factors associated with elevated hs-CRP.

Design: A population-representative sample of 801 Inuit residents from 14 villages of Nunavik, aged between 18 and 74 years, was included in the analyses. Subjects participated in a clinical session and completed questionnaires on lifestyle. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine risk factors for elevated hs-CRP.

Results: Elevated plasma hs-CRP concentrations (≥ 2 mg/L) were present in 32.7% (95% confidence interval (CI) 29.5-35.8) of the Inuit adult population and were more prevalent among women than among men (36.7% vs. 29.0%, p=0.007). Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that every 1 mmHg increase in systolic BP was associated with a 3% increase in the odds of having hs-CRP concentrations ≥ 2 mg/L in the Inuit population (95% CI 1.01-1.04). The combination of older age (≥ 50 vs. <30 years) and elevated waist circumference (gender-specific cut-off values) in a multivariate logistic model was also associated with a 13.3-fold increase in the odds of having plasma hs-CRP concentrations ≥ 2 mg/L (95% CI 5.8-30.9).

Conclusions: These data indicate that elevated hs-CRP is relatively prevalent among Inuit with values that are similar to those seen in Canadian Caucasian populations. Sex, age, waist circumference and systolic BP are major factors that increase the risk of this inflammatory phenotype among Inuit from Nunavik, despite their different lifestyle background compared with Caucasians.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Population prevalence of elevated hs-CRP concentrations among Inuit from Nunavik.Note: hs-CRP = high-sensitivity C-reactive protein; MetS = metabolic syndrome. Population prevalence of elevated hs-CRP concentrations (≥2.0 mg/L) is presented according to sex (A), age (B), waist circumference (C) and the presence of MetS (D). p-Values for between-groups differences in frequencies were obtained using the Chi-square test. Values within parentheses are 95% confidence intervals. Prevalence values are unadjusted for other variables. In panels C and D, high waist circumference cut-offs (≥90 cm in men and ≥80 cm in women) and MetS criteria are those suggested by the International Diabetes Federation (11).
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Figure 0002: Population prevalence of elevated hs-CRP concentrations among Inuit from Nunavik.Note: hs-CRP = high-sensitivity C-reactive protein; MetS = metabolic syndrome. Population prevalence of elevated hs-CRP concentrations (≥2.0 mg/L) is presented according to sex (A), age (B), waist circumference (C) and the presence of MetS (D). p-Values for between-groups differences in frequencies were obtained using the Chi-square test. Values within parentheses are 95% confidence intervals. Prevalence values are unadjusted for other variables. In panels C and D, high waist circumference cut-offs (≥90 cm in men and ≥80 cm in women) and MetS criteria are those suggested by the International Diabetes Federation (11).

Mentions: Estimated proportion of individuals with plasma hs-CRP concentrations ≥2.0 mg/L among the Nunavik Inuit population was 32.7% (95% CI 29.5–35.8). The estimated proportion of the population with plasma hs-CRP concentrations >3.0 mg/L was 21.4% (95% CI 18.7–24.0). As shown in Fig. 2, elevated plasma hs-CRP concentrations (≥2.0 mg/L) were more prevalent among women than among men (p=0.007). The prevalence of elevated hs-CRP concentrations also increased with age, waist circumference and presence of MetS (Fig. 2).


Population-based study of high plasma C-reactive protein concentrations among the Inuit of Nunavik.

Labonté ME, Dewailly E, Chateau-Degat ML, Couture P, Lamarche B - Int J Circumpolar Health (2012)

Population prevalence of elevated hs-CRP concentrations among Inuit from Nunavik.Note: hs-CRP = high-sensitivity C-reactive protein; MetS = metabolic syndrome. Population prevalence of elevated hs-CRP concentrations (≥2.0 mg/L) is presented according to sex (A), age (B), waist circumference (C) and the presence of MetS (D). p-Values for between-groups differences in frequencies were obtained using the Chi-square test. Values within parentheses are 95% confidence intervals. Prevalence values are unadjusted for other variables. In panels C and D, high waist circumference cut-offs (≥90 cm in men and ≥80 cm in women) and MetS criteria are those suggested by the International Diabetes Federation (11).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3475996&req=5

Figure 0002: Population prevalence of elevated hs-CRP concentrations among Inuit from Nunavik.Note: hs-CRP = high-sensitivity C-reactive protein; MetS = metabolic syndrome. Population prevalence of elevated hs-CRP concentrations (≥2.0 mg/L) is presented according to sex (A), age (B), waist circumference (C) and the presence of MetS (D). p-Values for between-groups differences in frequencies were obtained using the Chi-square test. Values within parentheses are 95% confidence intervals. Prevalence values are unadjusted for other variables. In panels C and D, high waist circumference cut-offs (≥90 cm in men and ≥80 cm in women) and MetS criteria are those suggested by the International Diabetes Federation (11).
Mentions: Estimated proportion of individuals with plasma hs-CRP concentrations ≥2.0 mg/L among the Nunavik Inuit population was 32.7% (95% CI 29.5–35.8). The estimated proportion of the population with plasma hs-CRP concentrations >3.0 mg/L was 21.4% (95% CI 18.7–24.0). As shown in Fig. 2, elevated plasma hs-CRP concentrations (≥2.0 mg/L) were more prevalent among women than among men (p=0.007). The prevalence of elevated hs-CRP concentrations also increased with age, waist circumference and presence of MetS (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that every 1 mmHg increase in systolic BP was associated with a 3% increase in the odds of having hs-CRP concentrations ≥ 2 mg/L in the Inuit population (95% CI 1.01-1.04).The combination of older age (≥ 50 vs. <30 years) and elevated waist circumference (gender-specific cut-off values) in a multivariate logistic model was also associated with a 13.3-fold increase in the odds of having plasma hs-CRP concentrations ≥ 2 mg/L (95% CI 5.8-30.9).Sex, age, waist circumference and systolic BP are major factors that increase the risk of this inflammatory phenotype among Inuit from Nunavik, despite their different lifestyle background compared with Caucasians.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods, Laval University, Québec, QC, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Background: The shift away from traditional lifestyle in the Inuit population over the past few decades has been associated with an increased prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors such as obesity, high blood pressure (BP) and diabetes. However, the impact of this transition on the pro-inflammatory marker high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) has not been documented.

Objectives: To examine the prevalence of elevated plasma hs-CRP concentrations in Inuit from Nunavik in the province of Quebec (Canada) and identify anthropometric, biochemical and lifestyle risk factors associated with elevated hs-CRP.

Design: A population-representative sample of 801 Inuit residents from 14 villages of Nunavik, aged between 18 and 74 years, was included in the analyses. Subjects participated in a clinical session and completed questionnaires on lifestyle. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine risk factors for elevated hs-CRP.

Results: Elevated plasma hs-CRP concentrations (≥ 2 mg/L) were present in 32.7% (95% confidence interval (CI) 29.5-35.8) of the Inuit adult population and were more prevalent among women than among men (36.7% vs. 29.0%, p=0.007). Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that every 1 mmHg increase in systolic BP was associated with a 3% increase in the odds of having hs-CRP concentrations ≥ 2 mg/L in the Inuit population (95% CI 1.01-1.04). The combination of older age (≥ 50 vs. <30 years) and elevated waist circumference (gender-specific cut-off values) in a multivariate logistic model was also associated with a 13.3-fold increase in the odds of having plasma hs-CRP concentrations ≥ 2 mg/L (95% CI 5.8-30.9).

Conclusions: These data indicate that elevated hs-CRP is relatively prevalent among Inuit with values that are similar to those seen in Canadian Caucasian populations. Sex, age, waist circumference and systolic BP are major factors that increase the risk of this inflammatory phenotype among Inuit from Nunavik, despite their different lifestyle background compared with Caucasians.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus