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Public priorities for joint pain research: results from a general population survey.

Strauss VY, Carter P, Ong BN, Bedson J, Jordan KP, Jinks C, Arthritis Research UK Research Users’ Gro - Rheumatology (Oxford) (2012)

Bottom Line: Those who preferred the medical options tended to be older and have hip or foot pain.Pharmaceutical and invasive interventions, despite being common topics of research, are of less importance to these respondents than non-medical topics.Specific research questions will be generated from this study with collaboration of the patient's group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre, Keele University, Keele ST5 5BG, UK. v.y.strauss@cphc.keele.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Objective: We aimed to identify the priorities for joint pain research from a large general population survey and identify characteristics associated with these priorities.

Methods: A question about research priorities was developed in collaboration with the Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre's Research Users' Group. The question was embedded in a postal survey to an existing cohort of adults with self-reported joint pain, aged ≥56 years, in North Staffordshire. Respondents were asked to rank their top three priorities for research. Factor mixture modelling was used to determine subgroups of priorities.

Results: In all, 1756 (88%) people responded to the survey. Of these, 1356 (77%) gave three priorities for research. Keeping active was rated the top priority by 38%, followed by research around joint replacement (9%) and diet/weight loss (9%). Two clusters of people were identified: 62% preferred lifestyle/self-management topics (e.g. keeping active, weight loss) and 38% preferred medical intervention topics (e.g. joint replacement, tablets). Those who preferred the medical options tended to be older and have hip or foot pain.

Conclusion: This study has provided population data on priorities for joint pain research expressed by a large cohort of older people who report joint pain. The most popular topics for research were linked to lifestyle and self-management opportunities. Pharmaceutical and invasive interventions, despite being common topics of research, are of less importance to these respondents than non-medical topics. Specific research questions will be generated from this study with collaboration of the patient's group.

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Top priority for joint pain research in 1396 survey responders aged ≥56 years.
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kes179-F1: Top priority for joint pain research in 1396 survey responders aged ≥56 years.

Mentions: Keeping active was the top priority for 38% of responders (Fig. 1). Next was joint replacement and research into weight loss/diets (both 9%) and research into education and advice (8%). The least popular topics for research were aids and adaptations, removal of fluids from joints and counselling (all 1%).Fig. 1


Public priorities for joint pain research: results from a general population survey.

Strauss VY, Carter P, Ong BN, Bedson J, Jordan KP, Jinks C, Arthritis Research UK Research Users’ Gro - Rheumatology (Oxford) (2012)

Top priority for joint pain research in 1396 survey responders aged ≥56 years.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3475978&req=5

kes179-F1: Top priority for joint pain research in 1396 survey responders aged ≥56 years.
Mentions: Keeping active was the top priority for 38% of responders (Fig. 1). Next was joint replacement and research into weight loss/diets (both 9%) and research into education and advice (8%). The least popular topics for research were aids and adaptations, removal of fluids from joints and counselling (all 1%).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Those who preferred the medical options tended to be older and have hip or foot pain.Pharmaceutical and invasive interventions, despite being common topics of research, are of less importance to these respondents than non-medical topics.Specific research questions will be generated from this study with collaboration of the patient's group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre, Keele University, Keele ST5 5BG, UK. v.y.strauss@cphc.keele.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Objective: We aimed to identify the priorities for joint pain research from a large general population survey and identify characteristics associated with these priorities.

Methods: A question about research priorities was developed in collaboration with the Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre's Research Users' Group. The question was embedded in a postal survey to an existing cohort of adults with self-reported joint pain, aged ≥56 years, in North Staffordshire. Respondents were asked to rank their top three priorities for research. Factor mixture modelling was used to determine subgroups of priorities.

Results: In all, 1756 (88%) people responded to the survey. Of these, 1356 (77%) gave three priorities for research. Keeping active was rated the top priority by 38%, followed by research around joint replacement (9%) and diet/weight loss (9%). Two clusters of people were identified: 62% preferred lifestyle/self-management topics (e.g. keeping active, weight loss) and 38% preferred medical intervention topics (e.g. joint replacement, tablets). Those who preferred the medical options tended to be older and have hip or foot pain.

Conclusion: This study has provided population data on priorities for joint pain research expressed by a large cohort of older people who report joint pain. The most popular topics for research were linked to lifestyle and self-management opportunities. Pharmaceutical and invasive interventions, despite being common topics of research, are of less importance to these respondents than non-medical topics. Specific research questions will be generated from this study with collaboration of the patient's group.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus