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Measuring group synchrony: a cluster-phase method for analyzing multivariate movement time-series.

Richardson MJ, Garcia RL, Frank TD, Gergor M, Marsh KL - Front Physiol (2012)

Bottom Line: A new method for assessing group synchrony is introduced as being potentially useful for objectively determining degree of group cohesiveness or entitativity.The cluster-phase method of Frank and Richardson (2010) was used to analyze movement data from the rocking chair movements of six-member groups who rocked their chairs while seated in a circle facing the center.Moreover, other aspects of the analysis illustrated how the cluster phase measures can be used to determine the type of patterning of group synchrony, and, when integrated with multi-level modeling, can be used to examine individual-level differences in synchrony and dyadic level synchrony as well.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Center for Cognition, Action, and Perception, University of Cincinnati Cincinnati, OH, USA.

ABSTRACT
A new method for assessing group synchrony is introduced as being potentially useful for objectively determining degree of group cohesiveness or entitativity. The cluster-phase method of Frank and Richardson (2010) was used to analyze movement data from the rocking chair movements of six-member groups who rocked their chairs while seated in a circle facing the center. In some trials group members had no information about others' movements (their eyes were shut) or they had their eyes open and gazed at a marker in the center of the group. As predicted, the group level synchrony measure was able to distinguish between situations where synchrony would have been possible and situations where it would be impossible. Moreover, other aspects of the analysis illustrated how the cluster phase measures can be used to determine the type of patterning of group synchrony, and, when integrated with multi-level modeling, can be used to examine individual-level differences in synchrony and dyadic level synchrony as well.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Continuous group synchrony, ρgroup,i averaged across group and trial.
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Figure 2: Continuous group synchrony, ρgroup,i averaged across group and trial.

Mentions: An inspection of Figure 2, which plots ρgroup,i averaged across group as a function of time, provides preliminary support for the cluster phase method. Specifically, the data presented in Figure 2 reveals how following an initial transient period of approximately 15 s, ρgroup,i for both of the eyes-open trials remained at a much greater level across the course of the trials than that observed for the eyes-closed condition. A similar pattern was exhibited for each of the eight groups, with ρgroup,i ranging between approximately 0.7 and 0.9 for the coordination (eyes-open) condition and between approximately 0.2 and 0.4 for the chance level (eyes-closed) condition.


Measuring group synchrony: a cluster-phase method for analyzing multivariate movement time-series.

Richardson MJ, Garcia RL, Frank TD, Gergor M, Marsh KL - Front Physiol (2012)

Continuous group synchrony, ρgroup,i averaged across group and trial.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3475977&req=5

Figure 2: Continuous group synchrony, ρgroup,i averaged across group and trial.
Mentions: An inspection of Figure 2, which plots ρgroup,i averaged across group as a function of time, provides preliminary support for the cluster phase method. Specifically, the data presented in Figure 2 reveals how following an initial transient period of approximately 15 s, ρgroup,i for both of the eyes-open trials remained at a much greater level across the course of the trials than that observed for the eyes-closed condition. A similar pattern was exhibited for each of the eight groups, with ρgroup,i ranging between approximately 0.7 and 0.9 for the coordination (eyes-open) condition and between approximately 0.2 and 0.4 for the chance level (eyes-closed) condition.

Bottom Line: A new method for assessing group synchrony is introduced as being potentially useful for objectively determining degree of group cohesiveness or entitativity.The cluster-phase method of Frank and Richardson (2010) was used to analyze movement data from the rocking chair movements of six-member groups who rocked their chairs while seated in a circle facing the center.Moreover, other aspects of the analysis illustrated how the cluster phase measures can be used to determine the type of patterning of group synchrony, and, when integrated with multi-level modeling, can be used to examine individual-level differences in synchrony and dyadic level synchrony as well.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Center for Cognition, Action, and Perception, University of Cincinnati Cincinnati, OH, USA.

ABSTRACT
A new method for assessing group synchrony is introduced as being potentially useful for objectively determining degree of group cohesiveness or entitativity. The cluster-phase method of Frank and Richardson (2010) was used to analyze movement data from the rocking chair movements of six-member groups who rocked their chairs while seated in a circle facing the center. In some trials group members had no information about others' movements (their eyes were shut) or they had their eyes open and gazed at a marker in the center of the group. As predicted, the group level synchrony measure was able to distinguish between situations where synchrony would have been possible and situations where it would be impossible. Moreover, other aspects of the analysis illustrated how the cluster phase measures can be used to determine the type of patterning of group synchrony, and, when integrated with multi-level modeling, can be used to examine individual-level differences in synchrony and dyadic level synchrony as well.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus