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Effect of dietary cadmium and/or lead on histopathological changes in the kidneys and liver of bank voles Myodes glareolus kept in different group densities.

Salińska A, Włostowski T, Zambrzycka E - Ecotoxicology (2012)

Bottom Line: The present work was designed to determine whether dietary lead (Pb), a common environmental co-contaminant, and/or animal density that affects various physiological processes, would influence susceptibility to Cd toxicity in the kidneys and liver of these animals.At the end of exposure period, histopathology and analyses of metallothionein, glutathione and zinc that are linked to a protective effect against Cd toxicity, as well as Cd, Pb, copper, iron and lipid peroxidation were carried out.Histopathological changes in the kidneys (a focal glomerular swelling and proximal tubule degeneration) and liver (a focal hepatocyte swelling, vacuolation and inflammation) occurred exclusively in some bank voles kept in a group and exposed to Cd alone (2/6) or Cd + Pb (4/6).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Biology, University of Białystok, Świerkowa 20B, 15-950, Białystok, Poland.

ABSTRACT
Bank voles free living in a contaminated environment are known to be more sensitive to cadmium (Cd) toxicity than the rodents exposed to Cd under laboratory conditions, but the reasons for this difference are poorly defined. The present work was designed to determine whether dietary lead (Pb), a common environmental co-contaminant, and/or animal density that affects various physiological processes, would influence susceptibility to Cd toxicity in the kidneys and liver of these animals. For 6 weeks, the female bank voles were kept individually or in a group of six and provided with diet containing environmentally relevant concentrations of Cd [<0.1 μg/g (control) and 60 μg/g dry wt] and Pb [<0.2 μg/g (control) and 300 μg/g dry wt] alone or in combination. At the end of exposure period, histopathology and analyses of metallothionein, glutathione and zinc that are linked to a protective effect against Cd toxicity, as well as Cd, Pb, copper, iron and lipid peroxidation were carried out. Histopathological changes in the kidneys (a focal glomerular swelling and proximal tubule degeneration) and liver (a focal hepatocyte swelling, vacuolation and inflammation) occurred exclusively in some bank voles kept in a group and exposed to Cd alone (2/6) or Cd + Pb (4/6). The observed toxicity in grouped bank voles appeared not to be based on altered (1) tissue disposition of Cd and/or Pb, (2) metallothionein, glutathione and zinc concentrations, or (3) tissue copper, iron and lipid peroxidation. The data indicate that high population density in combination with environmental Pb may be responsible for an increased susceptibility to Cd toxicity observed in bank voles free living in a contaminated environment; the mechanism by which animal density affects Cd toxicity deserves further study.

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Representative photomicrographs of liver section from (a) control bank voles, and (b, c) bank voles raised in a group of six and exposed to dietary Cd [b hepatocyte swelling (arrows), c leukocyte infiltration (arrowhead)]. Scale bar, 20 μm
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Fig2: Representative photomicrographs of liver section from (a) control bank voles, and (b, c) bank voles raised in a group of six and exposed to dietary Cd [b hepatocyte swelling (arrows), c leukocyte infiltration (arrowhead)]. Scale bar, 20 μm

Mentions: Values represent the mean ± SD for n = 6. Bank voles received, for 6 weeks, control diet or diets containing 60 μg Cd/g and/or 300 μg Pb/g. In parentheses the number of voles with histopathological changes per total number of animals is presented (see Figs. 1, 2). There were no statistically significant differences between the groups and subgroups


Effect of dietary cadmium and/or lead on histopathological changes in the kidneys and liver of bank voles Myodes glareolus kept in different group densities.

Salińska A, Włostowski T, Zambrzycka E - Ecotoxicology (2012)

Representative photomicrographs of liver section from (a) control bank voles, and (b, c) bank voles raised in a group of six and exposed to dietary Cd [b hepatocyte swelling (arrows), c leukocyte infiltration (arrowhead)]. Scale bar, 20 μm
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3475967&req=5

Fig2: Representative photomicrographs of liver section from (a) control bank voles, and (b, c) bank voles raised in a group of six and exposed to dietary Cd [b hepatocyte swelling (arrows), c leukocyte infiltration (arrowhead)]. Scale bar, 20 μm
Mentions: Values represent the mean ± SD for n = 6. Bank voles received, for 6 weeks, control diet or diets containing 60 μg Cd/g and/or 300 μg Pb/g. In parentheses the number of voles with histopathological changes per total number of animals is presented (see Figs. 1, 2). There were no statistically significant differences between the groups and subgroups

Bottom Line: The present work was designed to determine whether dietary lead (Pb), a common environmental co-contaminant, and/or animal density that affects various physiological processes, would influence susceptibility to Cd toxicity in the kidneys and liver of these animals.At the end of exposure period, histopathology and analyses of metallothionein, glutathione and zinc that are linked to a protective effect against Cd toxicity, as well as Cd, Pb, copper, iron and lipid peroxidation were carried out.Histopathological changes in the kidneys (a focal glomerular swelling and proximal tubule degeneration) and liver (a focal hepatocyte swelling, vacuolation and inflammation) occurred exclusively in some bank voles kept in a group and exposed to Cd alone (2/6) or Cd + Pb (4/6).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Biology, University of Białystok, Świerkowa 20B, 15-950, Białystok, Poland.

ABSTRACT
Bank voles free living in a contaminated environment are known to be more sensitive to cadmium (Cd) toxicity than the rodents exposed to Cd under laboratory conditions, but the reasons for this difference are poorly defined. The present work was designed to determine whether dietary lead (Pb), a common environmental co-contaminant, and/or animal density that affects various physiological processes, would influence susceptibility to Cd toxicity in the kidneys and liver of these animals. For 6 weeks, the female bank voles were kept individually or in a group of six and provided with diet containing environmentally relevant concentrations of Cd [<0.1 μg/g (control) and 60 μg/g dry wt] and Pb [<0.2 μg/g (control) and 300 μg/g dry wt] alone or in combination. At the end of exposure period, histopathology and analyses of metallothionein, glutathione and zinc that are linked to a protective effect against Cd toxicity, as well as Cd, Pb, copper, iron and lipid peroxidation were carried out. Histopathological changes in the kidneys (a focal glomerular swelling and proximal tubule degeneration) and liver (a focal hepatocyte swelling, vacuolation and inflammation) occurred exclusively in some bank voles kept in a group and exposed to Cd alone (2/6) or Cd + Pb (4/6). The observed toxicity in grouped bank voles appeared not to be based on altered (1) tissue disposition of Cd and/or Pb, (2) metallothionein, glutathione and zinc concentrations, or (3) tissue copper, iron and lipid peroxidation. The data indicate that high population density in combination with environmental Pb may be responsible for an increased susceptibility to Cd toxicity observed in bank voles free living in a contaminated environment; the mechanism by which animal density affects Cd toxicity deserves further study.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus