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Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in Santa Cruz, Bolivia: outbreak investigation and antibody prevalence study.

Montgomery JM, Blair PJ, Carroll DS, Mills JN, Gianella A, Iihoshi N, Briggiler AM, Felices V, Salazar M, Olson JG, Glabman RA, Bausch DG - PLoS Negl Trop Dis (2012)

Bottom Line: An antibody prevalence study conducted in the region as part of the outbreak investigation showed 45 (9.1%) of 494 persons to be IgG positive, illustrating that hantavirus infection is common in Santa Cruz Department.Precipitation in the months preceding the outbreak was particularly heavy in comparison to other years, suggesting a possible climatic or ecological influence on rodent populations and risk of hantavirus transmission to humans.Hantavirus infection appears to be common in the Santa Cruz Department, but more comprehensive surveillance and field studies are needed to fully understand the epidemiology and risk to humans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Special Pathogens Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.

ABSTRACT
We report the results of an investigation of a small outbreak of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in 2002 in the Department of Santa Cruz, Bolivia, where the disease had not previously been reported. Two cases were initially reported. The first case was a physician infected with Laguna Negra virus during a weekend visit to his ranch. Four other persons living on the ranch were IgM antibody-positive, two of whom were symptomatic for mild hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. The second case was a migrant sugarcane worker. Although no sample remained to determine the specific infecting hantavirus, a virus 90% homologous with Río Mamoré virus was previously found in small-eared pygmy rice rats (Oligoryzomys microtis) trapped in the area. An antibody prevalence study conducted in the region as part of the outbreak investigation showed 45 (9.1%) of 494 persons to be IgG positive, illustrating that hantavirus infection is common in Santa Cruz Department. Precipitation in the months preceding the outbreak was particularly heavy in comparison to other years, suggesting a possible climatic or ecological influence on rodent populations and risk of hantavirus transmission to humans. Hantavirus infection appears to be common in the Santa Cruz Department, but more comprehensive surveillance and field studies are needed to fully understand the epidemiology and risk to humans.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Hantavirus IgG antibody prevalence by age group in Mineros and Concepcion, Bolivia, 2002.Numbers on top of the bars indicate the total number of persons tested in that age group.
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pntd-0001840-g002: Hantavirus IgG antibody prevalence by age group in Mineros and Concepcion, Bolivia, 2002.Numbers on top of the bars indicate the total number of persons tested in that age group.

Mentions: A total of 494 persons were enrolled in the serosurvey, 415 from Mineros and 79 from Concepcion (Table 1). The mean age was 21 years (range 5–81) and 62% were male. The overall IgG antibody prevalence in all regions was 9.1% and did not differ significantly between any of the towns or communities studied. IgG-positive cases were noted in 35 households, with seven households having two cases (five in Dinamarca and one each in La Patria and Oriental) and one household in Concepcion having four cases. There were no significant differences in the frequency of IgG antibody in persons with respect to sex, occupation, house construction materials, hunting or fishing, home department in Bolivia, time spent living or working in Santa Cruz Department, rural or urban house location, or noting the presence of rodents at home or at work. Antibody-positive persons were significantly older than antibody negative ones (33 versus 24 years, respectively, p = .006). The IgG antibody prevalence stratified by age group is shown in Figure 2. Although not statistically significant, the highest IgG prevalence was noted in persons with professions that would likely put them at increased risk of exposure to rural rodents, such as farmers (15.2%) and sugarcane workers (9.4%), as opposed to housewives (7.2%) and students/children (7.1%).


Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in Santa Cruz, Bolivia: outbreak investigation and antibody prevalence study.

Montgomery JM, Blair PJ, Carroll DS, Mills JN, Gianella A, Iihoshi N, Briggiler AM, Felices V, Salazar M, Olson JG, Glabman RA, Bausch DG - PLoS Negl Trop Dis (2012)

Hantavirus IgG antibody prevalence by age group in Mineros and Concepcion, Bolivia, 2002.Numbers on top of the bars indicate the total number of persons tested in that age group.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3475674&req=5

pntd-0001840-g002: Hantavirus IgG antibody prevalence by age group in Mineros and Concepcion, Bolivia, 2002.Numbers on top of the bars indicate the total number of persons tested in that age group.
Mentions: A total of 494 persons were enrolled in the serosurvey, 415 from Mineros and 79 from Concepcion (Table 1). The mean age was 21 years (range 5–81) and 62% were male. The overall IgG antibody prevalence in all regions was 9.1% and did not differ significantly between any of the towns or communities studied. IgG-positive cases were noted in 35 households, with seven households having two cases (five in Dinamarca and one each in La Patria and Oriental) and one household in Concepcion having four cases. There were no significant differences in the frequency of IgG antibody in persons with respect to sex, occupation, house construction materials, hunting or fishing, home department in Bolivia, time spent living or working in Santa Cruz Department, rural or urban house location, or noting the presence of rodents at home or at work. Antibody-positive persons were significantly older than antibody negative ones (33 versus 24 years, respectively, p = .006). The IgG antibody prevalence stratified by age group is shown in Figure 2. Although not statistically significant, the highest IgG prevalence was noted in persons with professions that would likely put them at increased risk of exposure to rural rodents, such as farmers (15.2%) and sugarcane workers (9.4%), as opposed to housewives (7.2%) and students/children (7.1%).

Bottom Line: An antibody prevalence study conducted in the region as part of the outbreak investigation showed 45 (9.1%) of 494 persons to be IgG positive, illustrating that hantavirus infection is common in Santa Cruz Department.Precipitation in the months preceding the outbreak was particularly heavy in comparison to other years, suggesting a possible climatic or ecological influence on rodent populations and risk of hantavirus transmission to humans.Hantavirus infection appears to be common in the Santa Cruz Department, but more comprehensive surveillance and field studies are needed to fully understand the epidemiology and risk to humans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Special Pathogens Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.

ABSTRACT
We report the results of an investigation of a small outbreak of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in 2002 in the Department of Santa Cruz, Bolivia, where the disease had not previously been reported. Two cases were initially reported. The first case was a physician infected with Laguna Negra virus during a weekend visit to his ranch. Four other persons living on the ranch were IgM antibody-positive, two of whom were symptomatic for mild hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. The second case was a migrant sugarcane worker. Although no sample remained to determine the specific infecting hantavirus, a virus 90% homologous with Río Mamoré virus was previously found in small-eared pygmy rice rats (Oligoryzomys microtis) trapped in the area. An antibody prevalence study conducted in the region as part of the outbreak investigation showed 45 (9.1%) of 494 persons to be IgG positive, illustrating that hantavirus infection is common in Santa Cruz Department. Precipitation in the months preceding the outbreak was particularly heavy in comparison to other years, suggesting a possible climatic or ecological influence on rodent populations and risk of hantavirus transmission to humans. Hantavirus infection appears to be common in the Santa Cruz Department, but more comprehensive surveillance and field studies are needed to fully understand the epidemiology and risk to humans.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus