Limits...
Amino acid uptake in arbuscular mycorrhizal plants.

Whiteside MD, Garcia MO, Treseder KK - PLoS ONE (2012)

Bottom Line: We found that AM colonization increased uptake of phenylalanine, lysine, asparagine, arginine, histidine, methionine, tryptophan, and cysteine; and reduced uptake of aspartic acid.Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization had the greatest effect on uptake of amino acids that are relatively rare in proteins.Overall, the AM fungi used in this study appeared to improve access by plants to a number of amino acids, but not necessarily those that are common or negatively-charged.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biology Department and Institute for Species at Risk and Habitat Studies, University of British Columbia Okanagan, Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada.

ABSTRACT
We examined the extent to which arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi root improved the acquisition of simple organic nitrogen (ON) compounds by their host plants. In a greenhouse-based study, we used quantum dots (fluorescent nanoparticles) to assess uptake of each of the 20 proteinaceous amino acids by AM-colonized versus uncolonized plants. We found that AM colonization increased uptake of phenylalanine, lysine, asparagine, arginine, histidine, methionine, tryptophan, and cysteine; and reduced uptake of aspartic acid. Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization had the greatest effect on uptake of amino acids that are relatively rare in proteins. In addition, AM fungi facilitated uptake of neutral and positively-charged amino acids more than negatively-charged amino acids. Overall, the AM fungi used in this study appeared to improve access by plants to a number of amino acids, but not necessarily those that are common or negatively-charged.

Show MeSH
Relationship between the relative abundance of amino acids in proteins and the effect size of AM colonization on plant uptake of amino acids.Relative abundance was determined across all protein sequences accessible in GenBank (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov). Each symbol represents one amino acid; line is best-fit. The two variables were significantly negatively related to one another (P = 0.003).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3475604&req=5

pone-0047643-g002: Relationship between the relative abundance of amino acids in proteins and the effect size of AM colonization on plant uptake of amino acids.Relative abundance was determined across all protein sequences accessible in GenBank (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov). Each symbol represents one amino acid; line is best-fit. The two variables were significantly negatively related to one another (P = 0.003).

Mentions: Compared to uncolonized plants, AM plants took up significantly greater amounts of phenylalanine, lysine, asparagine, arginine, histidine, methionine, tryptophan, and cysteine (Fig. 1; P<0.05). In contrast, aspartic acid was taken up less by AM-colonized plants than uncolonized plants (P = 0.03). Colonization status did not significantly influence uptake of any other amino acids. Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization most strongly influenced uptake of rarer amino acids, which was the opposite pattern predicted for Hypothesis 1 (Fig. 2, r = −0.62, P = 0.003). Effect sizes did not differ significantly between aromatic (1.50±1.32, mean ±SE) and aliphatic amino acids (1.05±0.71), leading us to reject Hypothesis 2 (H = 22.00, P = 0.711). Likewise, Hypothesis 3 was rejected, because N content of amino acids was not significantly correlated with effect size (data not shown, r = 0.12, P = 0.61). Finally, Hypothesis 4 was only partially supported. Neutral, negatively-, and positively-charged amino acids differed marginally significantly from one another (H = 5.93, P = 0.052), and effect sizes for neutral amino acids (1.53±0.69) and positively-charged amino acids (1.46±0.19) were significantly greater than for negatively-charged amino acids (−2.51±1.72, P<0.001 for both). However, neutral and positively-charged amino acids did not differ significantly from one another (P = 0.63).


Amino acid uptake in arbuscular mycorrhizal plants.

Whiteside MD, Garcia MO, Treseder KK - PLoS ONE (2012)

Relationship between the relative abundance of amino acids in proteins and the effect size of AM colonization on plant uptake of amino acids.Relative abundance was determined across all protein sequences accessible in GenBank (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov). Each symbol represents one amino acid; line is best-fit. The two variables were significantly negatively related to one another (P = 0.003).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3475604&req=5

pone-0047643-g002: Relationship between the relative abundance of amino acids in proteins and the effect size of AM colonization on plant uptake of amino acids.Relative abundance was determined across all protein sequences accessible in GenBank (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov). Each symbol represents one amino acid; line is best-fit. The two variables were significantly negatively related to one another (P = 0.003).
Mentions: Compared to uncolonized plants, AM plants took up significantly greater amounts of phenylalanine, lysine, asparagine, arginine, histidine, methionine, tryptophan, and cysteine (Fig. 1; P<0.05). In contrast, aspartic acid was taken up less by AM-colonized plants than uncolonized plants (P = 0.03). Colonization status did not significantly influence uptake of any other amino acids. Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization most strongly influenced uptake of rarer amino acids, which was the opposite pattern predicted for Hypothesis 1 (Fig. 2, r = −0.62, P = 0.003). Effect sizes did not differ significantly between aromatic (1.50±1.32, mean ±SE) and aliphatic amino acids (1.05±0.71), leading us to reject Hypothesis 2 (H = 22.00, P = 0.711). Likewise, Hypothesis 3 was rejected, because N content of amino acids was not significantly correlated with effect size (data not shown, r = 0.12, P = 0.61). Finally, Hypothesis 4 was only partially supported. Neutral, negatively-, and positively-charged amino acids differed marginally significantly from one another (H = 5.93, P = 0.052), and effect sizes for neutral amino acids (1.53±0.69) and positively-charged amino acids (1.46±0.19) were significantly greater than for negatively-charged amino acids (−2.51±1.72, P<0.001 for both). However, neutral and positively-charged amino acids did not differ significantly from one another (P = 0.63).

Bottom Line: We found that AM colonization increased uptake of phenylalanine, lysine, asparagine, arginine, histidine, methionine, tryptophan, and cysteine; and reduced uptake of aspartic acid.Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization had the greatest effect on uptake of amino acids that are relatively rare in proteins.Overall, the AM fungi used in this study appeared to improve access by plants to a number of amino acids, but not necessarily those that are common or negatively-charged.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biology Department and Institute for Species at Risk and Habitat Studies, University of British Columbia Okanagan, Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada.

ABSTRACT
We examined the extent to which arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi root improved the acquisition of simple organic nitrogen (ON) compounds by their host plants. In a greenhouse-based study, we used quantum dots (fluorescent nanoparticles) to assess uptake of each of the 20 proteinaceous amino acids by AM-colonized versus uncolonized plants. We found that AM colonization increased uptake of phenylalanine, lysine, asparagine, arginine, histidine, methionine, tryptophan, and cysteine; and reduced uptake of aspartic acid. Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization had the greatest effect on uptake of amino acids that are relatively rare in proteins. In addition, AM fungi facilitated uptake of neutral and positively-charged amino acids more than negatively-charged amino acids. Overall, the AM fungi used in this study appeared to improve access by plants to a number of amino acids, but not necessarily those that are common or negatively-charged.

Show MeSH