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Identifying gaps in asthma education, health promotion, and social support for Mi'kmaq families in Unama'ki (Cape Breton), Nova Scotia, Canada.

Watson R, Castleden H, Tui'kn PartnershipMasuda J, King M, Stewart M - Prev Chronic Dis (2012)

Bottom Line: We employed a community-based participatory research design to conduct interviews with 21 youths aged 8 to 12 years and 17 caregivers from 5 Mi'kmaq communities in Unama'ki (Cape Breton) Nova Scotia, Canada.Our study yielded 4 key findings: 1) asthma triggers included household mold, indoor smoking, pets, season change, strenuous exercise, extreme cold, and humidity; 2) social and educational support is lacking in Mi'kmaq communities despite a strong desire for these services; 3) cultural, linguistic, and geographic barriers to accessing support exist; and 4) family members are primary support resources.Improved support and educational resources are needed to foster effective Mi'kmaq asthma support networks.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Asthma is the most common chronic condition affecting Aboriginal youth aged 8 to 12 years in Canada. Research investigating psychosocial challenges associated with asthma is limited. This study examines support resources, support-seeking strategies, support and education needs, and intervention preferences of Aboriginal youth with asthma and their caregivers in an effort to encourage community-wide, health-promoting behaviors.

Methods: We employed a community-based participatory research design to conduct interviews with 21 youths aged 8 to 12 years and 17 caregivers from 5 Mi'kmaq communities in Unama'ki (Cape Breton) Nova Scotia, Canada. After conducting interviews that explored existing and desired social, educational, and health support in participating communities, we held a 2-day asthma camp to engage participants in asthma education, social support networking, and cultural activities. At the camp, we collected data through participant observation, sharing circles, focus groups, and youth drawings of their experiences living with asthma.

Results: Our study yielded 4 key findings: 1) asthma triggers included household mold, indoor smoking, pets, season change, strenuous exercise, extreme cold, and humidity; 2) social and educational support is lacking in Mi'kmaq communities despite a strong desire for these services; 3) cultural, linguistic, and geographic barriers to accessing support exist; and 4) family members are primary support resources.

Conclusion: Improved support and educational resources are needed to foster effective Mi'kmaq asthma support networks. Future asthma interventions for marginalized populations must be culturally meaningful and linguistically accessible to those using and providing asthma support.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Map of Unama’ki (Cape Breton), Nova Scotia, showing location of 5 Mi’kmaq communities (Wagmatcook, Waycobah, Potlotek, Eskasoni, Membertou) participating in a study to identify gaps in asthma education, health promotion, and social support for Mi’kmaq families.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Figure 1: Map of Unama’ki (Cape Breton), Nova Scotia, showing location of 5 Mi’kmaq communities (Wagmatcook, Waycobah, Potlotek, Eskasoni, Membertou) participating in a study to identify gaps in asthma education, health promotion, and social support for Mi’kmaq families.

Mentions: The lead researcher for the Nova Scotia site (H.C.) spent a year (2010) establishing relationships with 5 Mi’kmaq communities in Unama’ki (Cape Breton), Nova Scotia (Figure) via each community’s health director. Once the research partnership was established, a local CAC was created with representation from each community’s cadre of health care professionals to offer guidance to the research team throughout the study. The CAC informed recruitment strategies, refined the research design, pilot-tested the data collection process, commented on preliminary findings, and communicated protocols to the communities. In spring 2011, 6 Mi’kmaq community researchers were hired and trained in participant recruitment and qualitative data collection.


Identifying gaps in asthma education, health promotion, and social support for Mi'kmaq families in Unama'ki (Cape Breton), Nova Scotia, Canada.

Watson R, Castleden H, Tui'kn PartnershipMasuda J, King M, Stewart M - Prev Chronic Dis (2012)

Map of Unama’ki (Cape Breton), Nova Scotia, showing location of 5 Mi’kmaq communities (Wagmatcook, Waycobah, Potlotek, Eskasoni, Membertou) participating in a study to identify gaps in asthma education, health promotion, and social support for Mi’kmaq families.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3475528&req=5

Figure 1: Map of Unama’ki (Cape Breton), Nova Scotia, showing location of 5 Mi’kmaq communities (Wagmatcook, Waycobah, Potlotek, Eskasoni, Membertou) participating in a study to identify gaps in asthma education, health promotion, and social support for Mi’kmaq families.
Mentions: The lead researcher for the Nova Scotia site (H.C.) spent a year (2010) establishing relationships with 5 Mi’kmaq communities in Unama’ki (Cape Breton), Nova Scotia (Figure) via each community’s health director. Once the research partnership was established, a local CAC was created with representation from each community’s cadre of health care professionals to offer guidance to the research team throughout the study. The CAC informed recruitment strategies, refined the research design, pilot-tested the data collection process, commented on preliminary findings, and communicated protocols to the communities. In spring 2011, 6 Mi’kmaq community researchers were hired and trained in participant recruitment and qualitative data collection.

Bottom Line: We employed a community-based participatory research design to conduct interviews with 21 youths aged 8 to 12 years and 17 caregivers from 5 Mi'kmaq communities in Unama'ki (Cape Breton) Nova Scotia, Canada.Our study yielded 4 key findings: 1) asthma triggers included household mold, indoor smoking, pets, season change, strenuous exercise, extreme cold, and humidity; 2) social and educational support is lacking in Mi'kmaq communities despite a strong desire for these services; 3) cultural, linguistic, and geographic barriers to accessing support exist; and 4) family members are primary support resources.Improved support and educational resources are needed to foster effective Mi'kmaq asthma support networks.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Asthma is the most common chronic condition affecting Aboriginal youth aged 8 to 12 years in Canada. Research investigating psychosocial challenges associated with asthma is limited. This study examines support resources, support-seeking strategies, support and education needs, and intervention preferences of Aboriginal youth with asthma and their caregivers in an effort to encourage community-wide, health-promoting behaviors.

Methods: We employed a community-based participatory research design to conduct interviews with 21 youths aged 8 to 12 years and 17 caregivers from 5 Mi'kmaq communities in Unama'ki (Cape Breton) Nova Scotia, Canada. After conducting interviews that explored existing and desired social, educational, and health support in participating communities, we held a 2-day asthma camp to engage participants in asthma education, social support networking, and cultural activities. At the camp, we collected data through participant observation, sharing circles, focus groups, and youth drawings of their experiences living with asthma.

Results: Our study yielded 4 key findings: 1) asthma triggers included household mold, indoor smoking, pets, season change, strenuous exercise, extreme cold, and humidity; 2) social and educational support is lacking in Mi'kmaq communities despite a strong desire for these services; 3) cultural, linguistic, and geographic barriers to accessing support exist; and 4) family members are primary support resources.

Conclusion: Improved support and educational resources are needed to foster effective Mi'kmaq asthma support networks. Future asthma interventions for marginalized populations must be culturally meaningful and linguistically accessible to those using and providing asthma support.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus