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Engaging a community in developing an entertainment-education Spanish-language radio novella aimed at reducing chronic disease risk factors, Alabama, 2010-2011.

Frazier M, Massingale S, Bowen M, Kohler C - Prev Chronic Dis (2012)

Bottom Line: Community members participated significantly in developing, broadcasting, and evaluating the intervention.The desired outcome - development of a culturally relevant storyline that addresses salient health issues and resonates with the community - was realized.The radio novella was a unique approach for addressing health disparities among our community's Hispanic population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Alabama at Birmingham, HPB 516, 1530 3rd Ave S, Birmingham, AL 35294-0010, USA. mfrazier@uab.edu

ABSTRACT

Background: US Hispanics have disproportionate rates of diabetes and other chronic diseases. We used the entertainment-education approach to develop a Spanish-language radio novella aimed at reducing risk factors for diabetes, obesity, and tobacco use. The approach is based on social cognitive theory and proposes modeling as a source of vicarious learning of outcome and efficacy expectations.

Community context: The Hispanic population in Alabama increased by 145% between 2000 and 2010. Nearly one-quarter of Hispanics aged 18 to 64 live below the federal poverty level, and 49% are uninsured. Several lifestyle factors lead to poor health behaviors in this community. Radio is a popular medium among Hispanic immigrants. The single local Spanish-language radio station reaches a large proportion of the local community and several communities beyond.

Methods: Through various methods, including workshops, review sessions, and other feedback mechanisms, we engaged stakeholders and community members in developing and evaluating a 48-episode radio novella to be broadcast as part of a variety show. We tracked participation of community members in all phases.

Outcome: Community members participated significantly in developing, broadcasting, and evaluating the intervention. The desired outcome - development of a culturally relevant storyline that addresses salient health issues and resonates with the community - was realized.

Interpretation: Our approach to community engagement can serve as a model for other organizations wishing to use community-based participatory methods in addressing Hispanic health issues. The radio novella was a unique approach for addressing health disparities among our community's Hispanic population.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Cast of a 48-episode serial drama, Promesas y Traiciones (Promises and Betrayals), that modeled preventive health behaviors and was broadcast in 2011 through a Spanish-language radio station in Alabama.
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Figure 1: Cast of a 48-episode serial drama, Promesas y Traiciones (Promises and Betrayals), that modeled preventive health behaviors and was broadcast in 2011 through a Spanish-language radio station in Alabama.

Mentions: We distributed an open call for scriptwriters nationally. Because we hoped to identify a local writer, we held an optional entertainment–education writing training session for local writers; we clarified that we would select a scriptwriter whose submission best satisfied our criteria, regardless of training attendance. We selected a native Spanish-speaking writer from another state who had entertainment–education writing experience and submitted the best sample scripts as judged by a panel of staff and community representatives. We provided the writer with the stories and health priorities that emerged from the workshops and delineated the health behavior objectives to incorporate into scripts. The writer submitted drafts, and we revised the episodes to ensure that health messages were appropriately included. An advisory group of native Spanish speakers reviewed the scripts for story quality and cultural relevance and provided feedback according to their areas of expertise. The advisory group consisted of a CDC diabetes educator, 2 radio station executives, a social services organization representative, and 2 community members. After a national search, we selected a director who is a Hispanic theater professor at a northeastern university. Acting auditions were held locally. Most actors were local residents; experience ranged from none to regular local productions. The final cast consisted of all but 1 actor from the immediate community (Figure). Production of the episodes took place at a local audio studio. Intervention team members listened to the episodes and requested revisions as necessary.


Engaging a community in developing an entertainment-education Spanish-language radio novella aimed at reducing chronic disease risk factors, Alabama, 2010-2011.

Frazier M, Massingale S, Bowen M, Kohler C - Prev Chronic Dis (2012)

Cast of a 48-episode serial drama, Promesas y Traiciones (Promises and Betrayals), that modeled preventive health behaviors and was broadcast in 2011 through a Spanish-language radio station in Alabama.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3475515&req=5

Figure 1: Cast of a 48-episode serial drama, Promesas y Traiciones (Promises and Betrayals), that modeled preventive health behaviors and was broadcast in 2011 through a Spanish-language radio station in Alabama.
Mentions: We distributed an open call for scriptwriters nationally. Because we hoped to identify a local writer, we held an optional entertainment–education writing training session for local writers; we clarified that we would select a scriptwriter whose submission best satisfied our criteria, regardless of training attendance. We selected a native Spanish-speaking writer from another state who had entertainment–education writing experience and submitted the best sample scripts as judged by a panel of staff and community representatives. We provided the writer with the stories and health priorities that emerged from the workshops and delineated the health behavior objectives to incorporate into scripts. The writer submitted drafts, and we revised the episodes to ensure that health messages were appropriately included. An advisory group of native Spanish speakers reviewed the scripts for story quality and cultural relevance and provided feedback according to their areas of expertise. The advisory group consisted of a CDC diabetes educator, 2 radio station executives, a social services organization representative, and 2 community members. After a national search, we selected a director who is a Hispanic theater professor at a northeastern university. Acting auditions were held locally. Most actors were local residents; experience ranged from none to regular local productions. The final cast consisted of all but 1 actor from the immediate community (Figure). Production of the episodes took place at a local audio studio. Intervention team members listened to the episodes and requested revisions as necessary.

Bottom Line: Community members participated significantly in developing, broadcasting, and evaluating the intervention.The desired outcome - development of a culturally relevant storyline that addresses salient health issues and resonates with the community - was realized.The radio novella was a unique approach for addressing health disparities among our community's Hispanic population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Alabama at Birmingham, HPB 516, 1530 3rd Ave S, Birmingham, AL 35294-0010, USA. mfrazier@uab.edu

ABSTRACT

Background: US Hispanics have disproportionate rates of diabetes and other chronic diseases. We used the entertainment-education approach to develop a Spanish-language radio novella aimed at reducing risk factors for diabetes, obesity, and tobacco use. The approach is based on social cognitive theory and proposes modeling as a source of vicarious learning of outcome and efficacy expectations.

Community context: The Hispanic population in Alabama increased by 145% between 2000 and 2010. Nearly one-quarter of Hispanics aged 18 to 64 live below the federal poverty level, and 49% are uninsured. Several lifestyle factors lead to poor health behaviors in this community. Radio is a popular medium among Hispanic immigrants. The single local Spanish-language radio station reaches a large proportion of the local community and several communities beyond.

Methods: Through various methods, including workshops, review sessions, and other feedback mechanisms, we engaged stakeholders and community members in developing and evaluating a 48-episode radio novella to be broadcast as part of a variety show. We tracked participation of community members in all phases.

Outcome: Community members participated significantly in developing, broadcasting, and evaluating the intervention. The desired outcome - development of a culturally relevant storyline that addresses salient health issues and resonates with the community - was realized.

Interpretation: Our approach to community engagement can serve as a model for other organizations wishing to use community-based participatory methods in addressing Hispanic health issues. The radio novella was a unique approach for addressing health disparities among our community's Hispanic population.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus