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The effect of post-treatment N-acetylcysteine in LPS-induced acute lung injury of rats.

Choi JS, Lee HS, Seo KH, Na JO, Kim YH, Uh ST, Park CS, Oh MH, Lee SH, Kim YT - Tuberc Respir Dis (Seoul) (2012)

Bottom Line: The concentration of LPO in NAC treatment group was significantly lower than that of LPS group (5.5±2.8 nmol/mL vs. 16.5±1.6 nmol/mL) (p=0.001).The activity of MPO in NAC treatment group was significantly lower than that of LPS group (6.4±1.8 unit/g vs. 11.2±6.3 unit/g, tissue) (p<0.048).The concentration of NF-κB in NAC treatment group was significantly lower than that of LPS group (0.3±0.1 ng/µL vs. 0.4±0.2 ng/µL) (p=0.0001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Clinical Research Institute, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Oxidation plays an important role in acute lung injury. This study was conducted in order to elucidate the effect of repetitive post-treatment of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) in lipopolysaccaride (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) of rats.

Methods: Six-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups. LPS (Escherichia coli 5 mg/kg) was administered intravenously via the tail vein. NAC (20 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally 3, 6, and 12 hours after LPS injection. Broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissues were obtained to evaluate the ALI at 24 hours after LPS injection. The concentration of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) were measured in BALF. Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), lipid peroxidation (LPO), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were measured using lung tissues. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) images were examined in each group at 72 hours apart from the main experiments in order to observe the delayed effects of NAC.

Results: TNF-α and IL-1β concentration in BALF were not different between LPS and NAC treatment groups. The concentration of LPO in NAC treatment group was significantly lower than that of LPS group (5.5±2.8 nmol/mL vs. 16.5±1.6 nmol/mL) (p=0.001). The activity of MPO in NAC treatment group was significantly lower than that of LPS group (6.4±1.8 unit/g vs. 11.2±6.3 unit/g, tissue) (p<0.048). The concentration of NF-κB in NAC treatment group was significantly lower than that of LPS group (0.3±0.1 ng/µL vs. 0.4±0.2 ng/µL) (p=0.0001). Micro-CT showed less extent of lung injury in NAC treatment than LPS group.

Conclusion: After induction of ALI with lipopolysaccharide, the therapeutic administration of NAC partially attenuated the extent of ALI through the inhibition of NF-κB activation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) of rat model. The N-acetylcysteine (NAC) group (A, right lung; B, left lung) shows normal lung parenchyma in micro-CT. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) group (C) and NAC treatment group (NAC+LPS group) (D) show ground glass opacity pattern in Rt. lower lobe, but in NAC treatment (D), the ground glass opacity decreased more than that in LPS group (C).
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Figure 2: Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) of rat model. The N-acetylcysteine (NAC) group (A, right lung; B, left lung) shows normal lung parenchyma in micro-CT. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) group (C) and NAC treatment group (NAC+LPS group) (D) show ground glass opacity pattern in Rt. lower lobe, but in NAC treatment (D), the ground glass opacity decreased more than that in LPS group (C).

Mentions: Three rats of LPS group (n=5) and 1 rat of NACTX group (n=5) were expired before taking the micro-CT mages at 72 hours after lung injury. Although the findings were not homogenous in the lung parenchyma, more dominant ground glass opacities were observed in LPS group compared to NACTX group (Figure 2).


The effect of post-treatment N-acetylcysteine in LPS-induced acute lung injury of rats.

Choi JS, Lee HS, Seo KH, Na JO, Kim YH, Uh ST, Park CS, Oh MH, Lee SH, Kim YT - Tuberc Respir Dis (Seoul) (2012)

Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) of rat model. The N-acetylcysteine (NAC) group (A, right lung; B, left lung) shows normal lung parenchyma in micro-CT. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) group (C) and NAC treatment group (NAC+LPS group) (D) show ground glass opacity pattern in Rt. lower lobe, but in NAC treatment (D), the ground glass opacity decreased more than that in LPS group (C).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3475471&req=5

Figure 2: Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) of rat model. The N-acetylcysteine (NAC) group (A, right lung; B, left lung) shows normal lung parenchyma in micro-CT. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) group (C) and NAC treatment group (NAC+LPS group) (D) show ground glass opacity pattern in Rt. lower lobe, but in NAC treatment (D), the ground glass opacity decreased more than that in LPS group (C).
Mentions: Three rats of LPS group (n=5) and 1 rat of NACTX group (n=5) were expired before taking the micro-CT mages at 72 hours after lung injury. Although the findings were not homogenous in the lung parenchyma, more dominant ground glass opacities were observed in LPS group compared to NACTX group (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: The concentration of LPO in NAC treatment group was significantly lower than that of LPS group (5.5±2.8 nmol/mL vs. 16.5±1.6 nmol/mL) (p=0.001).The activity of MPO in NAC treatment group was significantly lower than that of LPS group (6.4±1.8 unit/g vs. 11.2±6.3 unit/g, tissue) (p<0.048).The concentration of NF-κB in NAC treatment group was significantly lower than that of LPS group (0.3±0.1 ng/µL vs. 0.4±0.2 ng/µL) (p=0.0001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Clinical Research Institute, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Oxidation plays an important role in acute lung injury. This study was conducted in order to elucidate the effect of repetitive post-treatment of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) in lipopolysaccaride (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) of rats.

Methods: Six-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups. LPS (Escherichia coli 5 mg/kg) was administered intravenously via the tail vein. NAC (20 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally 3, 6, and 12 hours after LPS injection. Broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissues were obtained to evaluate the ALI at 24 hours after LPS injection. The concentration of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) were measured in BALF. Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), lipid peroxidation (LPO), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were measured using lung tissues. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) images were examined in each group at 72 hours apart from the main experiments in order to observe the delayed effects of NAC.

Results: TNF-α and IL-1β concentration in BALF were not different between LPS and NAC treatment groups. The concentration of LPO in NAC treatment group was significantly lower than that of LPS group (5.5±2.8 nmol/mL vs. 16.5±1.6 nmol/mL) (p=0.001). The activity of MPO in NAC treatment group was significantly lower than that of LPS group (6.4±1.8 unit/g vs. 11.2±6.3 unit/g, tissue) (p<0.048). The concentration of NF-κB in NAC treatment group was significantly lower than that of LPS group (0.3±0.1 ng/µL vs. 0.4±0.2 ng/µL) (p=0.0001). Micro-CT showed less extent of lung injury in NAC treatment than LPS group.

Conclusion: After induction of ALI with lipopolysaccharide, the therapeutic administration of NAC partially attenuated the extent of ALI through the inhibition of NF-κB activation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus