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Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: new concept.

Lee K - Tuberc Respir Dis (Seoul) (2012)

Bottom Line: On the basis of the strength of the available evidence, there was unanimous support for continuous emphasis on high-quality CPR with compressions of adequate rate and depth, which allows for complete chest recoil, minimizing interruptions in chest compressions and avoiding excessive ventilation.High-quality CPR is the cornerstone of a system of care that can optimize outcomes beyond return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC).There is an increased emphasis on physiologic monitoring to optimize CPR quality, and to detect ROSC.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a series of life-saving actions that improve the chances of survival, following cardiac arrest. Successful resuscitation, following cardiac arrest, requires an integrated set of coordinated actions represented by the links in the Chain of Survival. The links include the following: immediate recognition of cardiac arrest and activation of the emergency response system, early CPR with an emphasis on chest compressions, rapid defibrillation, effective advanced life support, and integrated post-cardiac arrest care. The newest development in the CPR guideline is a change in the basic life support sequence of steps from "A-B-C" (Airway, Breathing, Chest compressions) to "C-A-B" (Chest compressions, Airway, Breathing) for adults. Also, "Hands-Only (compression only) CPR" is emphasized for the untrained lay rescuer. On the basis of the strength of the available evidence, there was unanimous support for continuous emphasis on high-quality CPR with compressions of adequate rate and depth, which allows for complete chest recoil, minimizing interruptions in chest compressions and avoiding excessive ventilation. High-quality CPR is the cornerstone of a system of care that can optimize outcomes beyond return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). There is an increased emphasis on physiologic monitoring to optimize CPR quality, and to detect ROSC. A comprehensive, structured, integrated, multidisciplinary system of care should be implemented in a consistent manner for the treatment of post-cardiac arrest care patients. The return to a prior quality and functional state of health is the ultimate goal of a resuscitation system of care.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Post-cardiac arrest care algorithm. SBP: systolic blood pressure; IV: intravenous; IO: intraosseous; ECG: electrocardiogram; STEMI: ST segment elevation myocardial infarction; AMI: acute myocardial infarction.
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Figure 2: Post-cardiac arrest care algorithm. SBP: systolic blood pressure; IV: intravenous; IO: intraosseous; ECG: electrocardiogram; STEMI: ST segment elevation myocardial infarction; AMI: acute myocardial infarction.

Mentions: When CPR is attempted for patient in cardiac arrest, the patient may regain return of ROSC, however, the rate of discharged alive is low because in-hospital death rate is high due to the post-cardiac arrest syndrome even when a patient recovers from cardiac arrest. The Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation of Korea 2011 emphasizes the integrated post-cardiac arrest care is an important element of the Chain of Survival for raising the post-cardiac arrest survival rate which involves intensive care, therapeutic hypothermia, active intervention for coronary diseases and blood sugar level control after the subject regains ROSC, because such intensive and integrated treatment on the post-cardiac arrest syndrome reduces in-hospital death of patient with cardiac arrest and helps neurological recovery (Figure 2).


Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: new concept.

Lee K - Tuberc Respir Dis (Seoul) (2012)

Post-cardiac arrest care algorithm. SBP: systolic blood pressure; IV: intravenous; IO: intraosseous; ECG: electrocardiogram; STEMI: ST segment elevation myocardial infarction; AMI: acute myocardial infarction.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3475464&req=5

Figure 2: Post-cardiac arrest care algorithm. SBP: systolic blood pressure; IV: intravenous; IO: intraosseous; ECG: electrocardiogram; STEMI: ST segment elevation myocardial infarction; AMI: acute myocardial infarction.
Mentions: When CPR is attempted for patient in cardiac arrest, the patient may regain return of ROSC, however, the rate of discharged alive is low because in-hospital death rate is high due to the post-cardiac arrest syndrome even when a patient recovers from cardiac arrest. The Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation of Korea 2011 emphasizes the integrated post-cardiac arrest care is an important element of the Chain of Survival for raising the post-cardiac arrest survival rate which involves intensive care, therapeutic hypothermia, active intervention for coronary diseases and blood sugar level control after the subject regains ROSC, because such intensive and integrated treatment on the post-cardiac arrest syndrome reduces in-hospital death of patient with cardiac arrest and helps neurological recovery (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: On the basis of the strength of the available evidence, there was unanimous support for continuous emphasis on high-quality CPR with compressions of adequate rate and depth, which allows for complete chest recoil, minimizing interruptions in chest compressions and avoiding excessive ventilation.High-quality CPR is the cornerstone of a system of care that can optimize outcomes beyond return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC).There is an increased emphasis on physiologic monitoring to optimize CPR quality, and to detect ROSC.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a series of life-saving actions that improve the chances of survival, following cardiac arrest. Successful resuscitation, following cardiac arrest, requires an integrated set of coordinated actions represented by the links in the Chain of Survival. The links include the following: immediate recognition of cardiac arrest and activation of the emergency response system, early CPR with an emphasis on chest compressions, rapid defibrillation, effective advanced life support, and integrated post-cardiac arrest care. The newest development in the CPR guideline is a change in the basic life support sequence of steps from "A-B-C" (Airway, Breathing, Chest compressions) to "C-A-B" (Chest compressions, Airway, Breathing) for adults. Also, "Hands-Only (compression only) CPR" is emphasized for the untrained lay rescuer. On the basis of the strength of the available evidence, there was unanimous support for continuous emphasis on high-quality CPR with compressions of adequate rate and depth, which allows for complete chest recoil, minimizing interruptions in chest compressions and avoiding excessive ventilation. High-quality CPR is the cornerstone of a system of care that can optimize outcomes beyond return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). There is an increased emphasis on physiologic monitoring to optimize CPR quality, and to detect ROSC. A comprehensive, structured, integrated, multidisciplinary system of care should be implemented in a consistent manner for the treatment of post-cardiac arrest care patients. The return to a prior quality and functional state of health is the ultimate goal of a resuscitation system of care.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus