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Comparative gastric morphometry of Muong indigenous and Vietnamese wild pigs.

Trang PH, Ooi PT, Zuki AB, Noordin MM - ScientificWorldJournal (2012)

Bottom Line: The result indicated that the stomach of the Vietnamese wild pig is broader with a bigger capacity and greater proportion of proper gastric glands.On the other hand, the thicker (P < 0.05) submucosa in the Vietnamese wild pig is attributed to the presence of numerous loose connective tissues, abundant blood vessels, adipose tissues and nerve plexus.In conclusion, adaptations found in the Vietnamese wild pig indicated that this breed is equipped with a bigger and effectively functional stomach to suit its digestive physiology and immunity in the wild.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, 43400 Serdang, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT
It is hypothesized that despite sharing a similar habitat, the Muong indigenous and Vietnamese wild pigs may reveal different gastric morphology. Due to the protective nature of procuring these pigs, a total of 12 Muong indigenous pigs and nine Vietnamese wild pigs stomach collected post mortem were analysed for selected biometric parameters and histology. The result indicated that the stomach of the Vietnamese wild pig is broader with a bigger capacity and greater proportion of proper gastric glands. Interestingly, the stomach mass correlated well with live body weight in both breeds apart from possessing similar histomorphometry of the gastric gland regions. On the other hand, the thicker (P < 0.05) submucosa in the Vietnamese wild pig is attributed to the presence of numerous loose connective tissues, abundant blood vessels, adipose tissues and nerve plexus. The appearance of lymphoid follicles underneath the tubular gastric glands in the Vietnamese wild pig exceeded that of Muong indigenous pigs. This finding suggested that the difference in feeding behavior as well as immunity. In conclusion, adaptations found in the Vietnamese wild pig indicated that this breed is equipped with a bigger and effectively functional stomach to suit its digestive physiology and immunity in the wild.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Photomicrograph of AB staining showing different affinity of positive areas at various sites.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig6: Photomicrograph of AB staining showing different affinity of positive areas at various sites.

Mentions: Figures 5, 6, and 7 show the photomicrographs of the respective regions of the stomach in both breeds stained by H&E, AB, and PAS, respectively. Microscopically, the three layers of the muscularis were clearly discernible where the outermost was the thin longitudinal smooth muscle and occupied nearly a third of the total area (Figure 5). Covering about 2/3 of the total thickness of the muscularis was the middle circular muscle. The innermost layer was the oblique muscular that adjoins to the submucosa. This layer was thin and found to be not well-differentiated from circular layer in some sections. In addition, the myenteric plexus and blood vessels are sometime located between the two outer muscularis layers.


Comparative gastric morphometry of Muong indigenous and Vietnamese wild pigs.

Trang PH, Ooi PT, Zuki AB, Noordin MM - ScientificWorldJournal (2012)

Photomicrograph of AB staining showing different affinity of positive areas at various sites.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3475308&req=5

fig6: Photomicrograph of AB staining showing different affinity of positive areas at various sites.
Mentions: Figures 5, 6, and 7 show the photomicrographs of the respective regions of the stomach in both breeds stained by H&E, AB, and PAS, respectively. Microscopically, the three layers of the muscularis were clearly discernible where the outermost was the thin longitudinal smooth muscle and occupied nearly a third of the total area (Figure 5). Covering about 2/3 of the total thickness of the muscularis was the middle circular muscle. The innermost layer was the oblique muscular that adjoins to the submucosa. This layer was thin and found to be not well-differentiated from circular layer in some sections. In addition, the myenteric plexus and blood vessels are sometime located between the two outer muscularis layers.

Bottom Line: The result indicated that the stomach of the Vietnamese wild pig is broader with a bigger capacity and greater proportion of proper gastric glands.On the other hand, the thicker (P < 0.05) submucosa in the Vietnamese wild pig is attributed to the presence of numerous loose connective tissues, abundant blood vessels, adipose tissues and nerve plexus.In conclusion, adaptations found in the Vietnamese wild pig indicated that this breed is equipped with a bigger and effectively functional stomach to suit its digestive physiology and immunity in the wild.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, 43400 Serdang, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT
It is hypothesized that despite sharing a similar habitat, the Muong indigenous and Vietnamese wild pigs may reveal different gastric morphology. Due to the protective nature of procuring these pigs, a total of 12 Muong indigenous pigs and nine Vietnamese wild pigs stomach collected post mortem were analysed for selected biometric parameters and histology. The result indicated that the stomach of the Vietnamese wild pig is broader with a bigger capacity and greater proportion of proper gastric glands. Interestingly, the stomach mass correlated well with live body weight in both breeds apart from possessing similar histomorphometry of the gastric gland regions. On the other hand, the thicker (P < 0.05) submucosa in the Vietnamese wild pig is attributed to the presence of numerous loose connective tissues, abundant blood vessels, adipose tissues and nerve plexus. The appearance of lymphoid follicles underneath the tubular gastric glands in the Vietnamese wild pig exceeded that of Muong indigenous pigs. This finding suggested that the difference in feeding behavior as well as immunity. In conclusion, adaptations found in the Vietnamese wild pig indicated that this breed is equipped with a bigger and effectively functional stomach to suit its digestive physiology and immunity in the wild.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus