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SenseWear Armband and Stroke: Validity of Energy Expenditure and Step Count Measurement during Walking.

Manns PJ, Haennel RG - Stroke Res Treat (2012)

Bottom Line: The purpose of this study was to test the validity of the SenseWear Pro Armband (SWA) for the measurement of energy expenditure (EE) and step count against a criterion in persons with stroke.Agreement between the SWA estimate of step count, and step count as measured by the Step Activity Monitor was poor (ICC < 0.352), with significant underestimation by the SWA.Our results show that, for these moderately impaired persons with stroke, the SWA should be used with caution for the measurement of energy expenditure and should not be used to measure step count.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, 2-50 Corbett Hall, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2G4, Canada.

ABSTRACT
The purpose of this study was to test the validity of the SenseWear Pro Armband (SWA) for the measurement of energy expenditure (EE) and step count against a criterion in persons with stroke. Twelve participants with chronic stroke (mean age 64.2 ± 10.4 years; mean gait speed 0.67 ± 0.25 m/sec) completed two trials of a six-minute walk test, while wearing a SenseWear Armband (SWA) on each arm and being continuously monitored using a portable metabolic cart. Agreement between estimates of energy expenditure from the SWA and the metabolic cart was fair for the armband on the hemiplegic arm (intraclass correlation cefficient (ICC) = 0.586) and good for the armband on the unaffected arm (ICC = 0.702). Agreement between the SWA estimate of step count, and step count as measured by the Step Activity Monitor was poor (ICC < 0.352), with significant underestimation by the SWA. Our results show that, for these moderately impaired persons with stroke, the SWA should be used with caution for the measurement of energy expenditure and should not be used to measure step count.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Graphical plot of average EE versus the difference between the two measurement methods.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Graphical plot of average EE versus the difference between the two measurement methods.

Mentions: Values from the two six-minute walks (for EE and steps) were combined for testing agreement, thus the sample size was 22 and 24 for tests utilizing the SWA on the hemiplegic arm and the nonhemiplegic arm respectively. For one participant, the SWA malfunctioned on the hemiplegic arm (i.e., no values were recorded). On average, the SWA reported greater EE during walking (Figure 1, Table 2), compared to the metabolic cart, and agreement was slightly better with the nonhemiplegic arm compared to the hemiplegic arm (Table 3). Agreement between the SWA on the hemiplegic arm versus the non-hemiplegic arm was moderate. Agreement between EE values from the SWA on the right arm (placement as per the manufacturer's instructions) and the MC was good and is similar to agreement between the EE values from SWA on the non-hemiplegic arm and the MC (ICC = 0.715, and 0.702 resp.). This should not be surprising as the right arm and the non-hemiplegic arm were one and the same for all but two individuals. Absolute percent difference in EE was 17.9% for the hemiplegic arm and 18.4% for the non-hemiplegic arm with only about one third of values falling within ±10% difference. Graphically (Figure 1), average overestimation by the SWA was 0.33 kcal/min. There does not appear to be better or worse agreement related to the average EE as measured by the criterion.


SenseWear Armband and Stroke: Validity of Energy Expenditure and Step Count Measurement during Walking.

Manns PJ, Haennel RG - Stroke Res Treat (2012)

Graphical plot of average EE versus the difference between the two measurement methods.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3475303&req=5

fig1: Graphical plot of average EE versus the difference between the two measurement methods.
Mentions: Values from the two six-minute walks (for EE and steps) were combined for testing agreement, thus the sample size was 22 and 24 for tests utilizing the SWA on the hemiplegic arm and the nonhemiplegic arm respectively. For one participant, the SWA malfunctioned on the hemiplegic arm (i.e., no values were recorded). On average, the SWA reported greater EE during walking (Figure 1, Table 2), compared to the metabolic cart, and agreement was slightly better with the nonhemiplegic arm compared to the hemiplegic arm (Table 3). Agreement between the SWA on the hemiplegic arm versus the non-hemiplegic arm was moderate. Agreement between EE values from the SWA on the right arm (placement as per the manufacturer's instructions) and the MC was good and is similar to agreement between the EE values from SWA on the non-hemiplegic arm and the MC (ICC = 0.715, and 0.702 resp.). This should not be surprising as the right arm and the non-hemiplegic arm were one and the same for all but two individuals. Absolute percent difference in EE was 17.9% for the hemiplegic arm and 18.4% for the non-hemiplegic arm with only about one third of values falling within ±10% difference. Graphically (Figure 1), average overestimation by the SWA was 0.33 kcal/min. There does not appear to be better or worse agreement related to the average EE as measured by the criterion.

Bottom Line: The purpose of this study was to test the validity of the SenseWear Pro Armband (SWA) for the measurement of energy expenditure (EE) and step count against a criterion in persons with stroke.Agreement between the SWA estimate of step count, and step count as measured by the Step Activity Monitor was poor (ICC < 0.352), with significant underestimation by the SWA.Our results show that, for these moderately impaired persons with stroke, the SWA should be used with caution for the measurement of energy expenditure and should not be used to measure step count.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, 2-50 Corbett Hall, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2G4, Canada.

ABSTRACT
The purpose of this study was to test the validity of the SenseWear Pro Armband (SWA) for the measurement of energy expenditure (EE) and step count against a criterion in persons with stroke. Twelve participants with chronic stroke (mean age 64.2 ± 10.4 years; mean gait speed 0.67 ± 0.25 m/sec) completed two trials of a six-minute walk test, while wearing a SenseWear Armband (SWA) on each arm and being continuously monitored using a portable metabolic cart. Agreement between estimates of energy expenditure from the SWA and the metabolic cart was fair for the armband on the hemiplegic arm (intraclass correlation cefficient (ICC) = 0.586) and good for the armband on the unaffected arm (ICC = 0.702). Agreement between the SWA estimate of step count, and step count as measured by the Step Activity Monitor was poor (ICC < 0.352), with significant underestimation by the SWA. Our results show that, for these moderately impaired persons with stroke, the SWA should be used with caution for the measurement of energy expenditure and should not be used to measure step count.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus