Limits...
Strategies to fight stigma toward people with mental disorders: perspectives from different stakeholders.

Corbière M, Samson E, Villotti P, Pelletier JF - ScientificWorldJournal (2012)

Bottom Line: These categories fell under six main themes: education, contact, protestation, person centered, working on recovery and social inclusion, and reflexive consciousness.The occurrence of these themes was different among stakeholders (clinical, organizational, and experiential knowledge).Future studies are needed to assess the impact of the emerging strategies to fight stigma in the community.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Rehabilitation, Université de Sherbrooke, and Centre for Action in Work Disability Prevention and Rehabilitation, 150 Place Charles LeMoyne, Longueuil, QC, Canada J4K 0A8. marc.corbiere@usherbrooke.ca

ABSTRACT
This study aims to provide a more complete and exhaustive perspective on the whole range of potential strategies to fight stigma by considering the perspectives of different stakeholders. Delegates to a Canadian conference were invited to participate in a survey that focused on stigma, from which the responses to the following question were analyzed: tell us briefly what you do to reduce prejudice and stigma toward people with a diagnosis of mental disorder? From 253 participants, 15 categories of strategies to fight stigma were identified from the verbatim (e.g., sharing/encouraging disclosure). These categories fell under six main themes: education, contact, protestation, person centered, working on recovery and social inclusion, and reflexive consciousness. The occurrence of these themes was different among stakeholders (clinical, organizational, and experiential knowledge). For example, people with mental disorders (experiential knowledge) often mentioned contact and person centered strategies, while mental health professionals (clinical knowledge) preferred education and working on recovery and social inclusion strategies. The results from this study highlight the need to pay more attention to the concept of disclosure of mental disorders in the process for de-stigmatization. Future studies are needed to assess the impact of the emerging strategies to fight stigma in the community.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Types of strategies (themes) according to the respondents' type of knowledge.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3475300&req=5

fig2: Types of strategies (themes) according to the respondents' type of knowledge.

Mentions: In addition to these three themes of strategies directly inspired by the scientific literature, this study, which was aimed at people related to the mental health field, has identified three additional major themes of strategies: person centered, working on recovery and social inclusion and reflective consciousness. The theme Person centered implies treating the person with a mental disorder diagnosis as any other person (as seen above), but also accepting, respecting, listening to, and caring for the person. This last theme means to act without discrimination against a person with a mental disorder, to welcome that person like anyone else; it is to have speech and values that place the individual as a whole person, beyond diagnosis. The theme Working on recovery and social inclusion implies the idea of supporting and encouraging the person, believing in him/her, building on his/her strengths and possibilities, and fostering his/her integration into the community. The theme of Reflexive consciousness refers to Doing introspective work and Being natural. The strategies related to this theme imply a return to oneself. Based on these six broad themes of strategies to fight stigma, Figure 2 highlights the percentages of the three groups of people according to their type of knowledge: experiential, organizational, and clinical.


Strategies to fight stigma toward people with mental disorders: perspectives from different stakeholders.

Corbière M, Samson E, Villotti P, Pelletier JF - ScientificWorldJournal (2012)

Types of strategies (themes) according to the respondents' type of knowledge.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3475300&req=5

fig2: Types of strategies (themes) according to the respondents' type of knowledge.
Mentions: In addition to these three themes of strategies directly inspired by the scientific literature, this study, which was aimed at people related to the mental health field, has identified three additional major themes of strategies: person centered, working on recovery and social inclusion and reflective consciousness. The theme Person centered implies treating the person with a mental disorder diagnosis as any other person (as seen above), but also accepting, respecting, listening to, and caring for the person. This last theme means to act without discrimination against a person with a mental disorder, to welcome that person like anyone else; it is to have speech and values that place the individual as a whole person, beyond diagnosis. The theme Working on recovery and social inclusion implies the idea of supporting and encouraging the person, believing in him/her, building on his/her strengths and possibilities, and fostering his/her integration into the community. The theme of Reflexive consciousness refers to Doing introspective work and Being natural. The strategies related to this theme imply a return to oneself. Based on these six broad themes of strategies to fight stigma, Figure 2 highlights the percentages of the three groups of people according to their type of knowledge: experiential, organizational, and clinical.

Bottom Line: These categories fell under six main themes: education, contact, protestation, person centered, working on recovery and social inclusion, and reflexive consciousness.The occurrence of these themes was different among stakeholders (clinical, organizational, and experiential knowledge).Future studies are needed to assess the impact of the emerging strategies to fight stigma in the community.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Rehabilitation, Université de Sherbrooke, and Centre for Action in Work Disability Prevention and Rehabilitation, 150 Place Charles LeMoyne, Longueuil, QC, Canada J4K 0A8. marc.corbiere@usherbrooke.ca

ABSTRACT
This study aims to provide a more complete and exhaustive perspective on the whole range of potential strategies to fight stigma by considering the perspectives of different stakeholders. Delegates to a Canadian conference were invited to participate in a survey that focused on stigma, from which the responses to the following question were analyzed: tell us briefly what you do to reduce prejudice and stigma toward people with a diagnosis of mental disorder? From 253 participants, 15 categories of strategies to fight stigma were identified from the verbatim (e.g., sharing/encouraging disclosure). These categories fell under six main themes: education, contact, protestation, person centered, working on recovery and social inclusion, and reflexive consciousness. The occurrence of these themes was different among stakeholders (clinical, organizational, and experiential knowledge). For example, people with mental disorders (experiential knowledge) often mentioned contact and person centered strategies, while mental health professionals (clinical knowledge) preferred education and working on recovery and social inclusion strategies. The results from this study highlight the need to pay more attention to the concept of disclosure of mental disorders in the process for de-stigmatization. Future studies are needed to assess the impact of the emerging strategies to fight stigma in the community.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus