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Regulation of lifespan by chemosensory and thermosensory systems: findings in invertebrates and their implications in mammalian aging.

Jeong DE, Artan M, Seo K, Lee SJ - Front Genet (2012)

Bottom Line: Several studies have shown that chemosensory and thermosensory neurons affect the lifespan of invertebrate model animals, including Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster.Although the mechanisms by which these sensory systems modulate lifespan are incompletely understood, hormonal signaling pathways have been implicated in sensory system-mediated lifespan regulation.In this review, we describe findings regarding how sensory nervous system components elicit physiological changes to regulate lifespan in invertebrate models, and discuss their implications in mammalian aging.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Molecular and Life Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology Pohang, South Korea.

ABSTRACT
Many environmental factors that dynamically change in nature influence various aspects of animal physiology. Animals are equipped with sensory neuronal systems that help them properly sense and respond to environmental factors. Several studies have shown that chemosensory and thermosensory neurons affect the lifespan of invertebrate model animals, including Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. Although the mechanisms by which these sensory systems modulate lifespan are incompletely understood, hormonal signaling pathways have been implicated in sensory system-mediated lifespan regulation. In this review, we describe findings regarding how sensory nervous system components elicit physiological changes to regulate lifespan in invertebrate models, and discuss their implications in mammalian aging.

No MeSH data available.


Implication of chemosensory regulation in human aging. Food perception by sensory systems in humans appears to increase human insulin/IGF-1 signaling. Because the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway is known to regulate mammalian lifespan, perhaps human chemosensation also influences aging via the insulin/IGF-1 pathway.
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Figure 3: Implication of chemosensory regulation in human aging. Food perception by sensory systems in humans appears to increase human insulin/IGF-1 signaling. Because the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway is known to regulate mammalian lifespan, perhaps human chemosensation also influences aging via the insulin/IGF-1 pathway.

Mentions: Although there is no evidence for a chemosensory neural system influencing the lifespan of mammals to date, it has been established that the mammalian nervous system controls endocrine signaling and influences lifespan. The regulation of aging by the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway is evolutionarily well conserved from yeast to mammals (Kenyon, 2010). Interestingly, mammalian insulin/IGF-1 signaling is modulated by a neural system as in C. elegans. Insulin signaling in the brain influences not only metabolism and reproduction but also lifespan in mice (Bruning, 2000; Plum et al., 2005; Taguchi et al., 2007; Kappeler et al., 2008; Scherer et al., 2011). Insulin levels in humans are increased by the sensation of foods (Sjostrom et al., 1980), suggesting that chemosensation itself can influence insulin signaling in mammals (Figure 3). It will be interesting to determine whether insulin signaling regulated by the mammalian chemosensory system influences aging processes.


Regulation of lifespan by chemosensory and thermosensory systems: findings in invertebrates and their implications in mammalian aging.

Jeong DE, Artan M, Seo K, Lee SJ - Front Genet (2012)

Implication of chemosensory regulation in human aging. Food perception by sensory systems in humans appears to increase human insulin/IGF-1 signaling. Because the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway is known to regulate mammalian lifespan, perhaps human chemosensation also influences aging via the insulin/IGF-1 pathway.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3475297&req=5

Figure 3: Implication of chemosensory regulation in human aging. Food perception by sensory systems in humans appears to increase human insulin/IGF-1 signaling. Because the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway is known to regulate mammalian lifespan, perhaps human chemosensation also influences aging via the insulin/IGF-1 pathway.
Mentions: Although there is no evidence for a chemosensory neural system influencing the lifespan of mammals to date, it has been established that the mammalian nervous system controls endocrine signaling and influences lifespan. The regulation of aging by the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway is evolutionarily well conserved from yeast to mammals (Kenyon, 2010). Interestingly, mammalian insulin/IGF-1 signaling is modulated by a neural system as in C. elegans. Insulin signaling in the brain influences not only metabolism and reproduction but also lifespan in mice (Bruning, 2000; Plum et al., 2005; Taguchi et al., 2007; Kappeler et al., 2008; Scherer et al., 2011). Insulin levels in humans are increased by the sensation of foods (Sjostrom et al., 1980), suggesting that chemosensation itself can influence insulin signaling in mammals (Figure 3). It will be interesting to determine whether insulin signaling regulated by the mammalian chemosensory system influences aging processes.

Bottom Line: Several studies have shown that chemosensory and thermosensory neurons affect the lifespan of invertebrate model animals, including Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster.Although the mechanisms by which these sensory systems modulate lifespan are incompletely understood, hormonal signaling pathways have been implicated in sensory system-mediated lifespan regulation.In this review, we describe findings regarding how sensory nervous system components elicit physiological changes to regulate lifespan in invertebrate models, and discuss their implications in mammalian aging.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Molecular and Life Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology Pohang, South Korea.

ABSTRACT
Many environmental factors that dynamically change in nature influence various aspects of animal physiology. Animals are equipped with sensory neuronal systems that help them properly sense and respond to environmental factors. Several studies have shown that chemosensory and thermosensory neurons affect the lifespan of invertebrate model animals, including Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. Although the mechanisms by which these sensory systems modulate lifespan are incompletely understood, hormonal signaling pathways have been implicated in sensory system-mediated lifespan regulation. In this review, we describe findings regarding how sensory nervous system components elicit physiological changes to regulate lifespan in invertebrate models, and discuss their implications in mammalian aging.

No MeSH data available.