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Poor knowledge and practices related to iodine nutrition during pregnancy and lactation in Australian women: pre- and post-iodine fortification.

Charlton K, Yeatman H, Lucas C, Axford S, Gemming L, Houweling F, Goodfellow A, Ma G - Nutrients (2012)

Bottom Line: Surveys of pregnant (n = 139) and non-pregnant (n = 75) women in 2007-2008 are compared with surveys of pregnant (n = 147) and lactating women (n = 60) one to two years post-fortification in a regional area of New South Wales, Australia.A low intake of fish and seafood resulted in this food group contributing only 3%-8% of total intake.A low level of public awareness regarding the role of iodine in health supports the need for public health strategies in addition to fortification, such as an accompanying consumer education campaign, increased uptake of supplementation, and on-going monitoring.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Health Sciences, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia. karenc@uow.edu.au

ABSTRACT
A before-after review was undertaken to assess whether knowledge and practices related to iodine nutrition, supplementation and fortification has improved in Australian women since the introduction of mandatory iodine fortification in 2009. Surveys of pregnant (n = 139) and non-pregnant (n = 75) women in 2007-2008 are compared with surveys of pregnant (n = 147) and lactating women (n = 60) one to two years post-fortification in a regional area of New South Wales, Australia. A self-administered questionnaire was completed and dietary intake of iodine was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire. A generally poor knowledge about the role and sources of iodine in the diet remained after fortification. Post-fortification, iodine-containing supplements were being taken by 60% (up from 20% pre-fortification) and 45% of pregnant and lactating women, respectively. Dairy foods were the highest contributors to dietary iodine intake (57%-62%). A low intake of fish and seafood resulted in this food group contributing only 3%-8% of total intake. A low level of public awareness regarding the role of iodine in health supports the need for public health strategies in addition to fortification, such as an accompanying consumer education campaign, increased uptake of supplementation, and on-going monitoring.

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Pregnant womens’ responses regarding whether they had received sufficient dietary information on nutrition while pregnant to make informed decisions: Pre- (2008) and Post-fortification (2011).
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nutrients-04-01317-f002: Pregnant womens’ responses regarding whether they had received sufficient dietary information on nutrition while pregnant to make informed decisions: Pre- (2008) and Post-fortification (2011).

Mentions: Knowledge of iodine rich food sources was lacking both before and after mandatory fortification; 50%–58% of women correctly identified seafood as a good source while between a quarter and a third correctly identified milk, eggs or bread (Table 2). Participants were also limited in their ability to identify outcomes related to iodine deficiency and at risk groups; between 27% and 31% of pregnant and lactating women correctly identified mental retardation as a potential outcome (Figure 1). Both pre- and post-fortification, most women did not know if iodine was a public health problem in Australia (76%–90% vs. 80%–85%, respectively). Although some improvement following fortification was evident, most women perceived that they had not received enough information regarding iodine to make informed decisions during their pregnancy (83% (pre-) and 66% (post-fortification)). Women were much more confident about their knowledge of other nutrition related topics in pregnancy, including healthy eating, listeria and food poisoning, folate, calcium and iron (See Figure 2). The most commonly cited source for nutrition advice, including iodine, across all surveys was verbal information from healthcare professionals, followed by written information from healthcare professionals and the internet (Table 3).


Poor knowledge and practices related to iodine nutrition during pregnancy and lactation in Australian women: pre- and post-iodine fortification.

Charlton K, Yeatman H, Lucas C, Axford S, Gemming L, Houweling F, Goodfellow A, Ma G - Nutrients (2012)

Pregnant womens’ responses regarding whether they had received sufficient dietary information on nutrition while pregnant to make informed decisions: Pre- (2008) and Post-fortification (2011).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3475241&req=5

nutrients-04-01317-f002: Pregnant womens’ responses regarding whether they had received sufficient dietary information on nutrition while pregnant to make informed decisions: Pre- (2008) and Post-fortification (2011).
Mentions: Knowledge of iodine rich food sources was lacking both before and after mandatory fortification; 50%–58% of women correctly identified seafood as a good source while between a quarter and a third correctly identified milk, eggs or bread (Table 2). Participants were also limited in their ability to identify outcomes related to iodine deficiency and at risk groups; between 27% and 31% of pregnant and lactating women correctly identified mental retardation as a potential outcome (Figure 1). Both pre- and post-fortification, most women did not know if iodine was a public health problem in Australia (76%–90% vs. 80%–85%, respectively). Although some improvement following fortification was evident, most women perceived that they had not received enough information regarding iodine to make informed decisions during their pregnancy (83% (pre-) and 66% (post-fortification)). Women were much more confident about their knowledge of other nutrition related topics in pregnancy, including healthy eating, listeria and food poisoning, folate, calcium and iron (See Figure 2). The most commonly cited source for nutrition advice, including iodine, across all surveys was verbal information from healthcare professionals, followed by written information from healthcare professionals and the internet (Table 3).

Bottom Line: Surveys of pregnant (n = 139) and non-pregnant (n = 75) women in 2007-2008 are compared with surveys of pregnant (n = 147) and lactating women (n = 60) one to two years post-fortification in a regional area of New South Wales, Australia.A low intake of fish and seafood resulted in this food group contributing only 3%-8% of total intake.A low level of public awareness regarding the role of iodine in health supports the need for public health strategies in addition to fortification, such as an accompanying consumer education campaign, increased uptake of supplementation, and on-going monitoring.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Health Sciences, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia. karenc@uow.edu.au

ABSTRACT
A before-after review was undertaken to assess whether knowledge and practices related to iodine nutrition, supplementation and fortification has improved in Australian women since the introduction of mandatory iodine fortification in 2009. Surveys of pregnant (n = 139) and non-pregnant (n = 75) women in 2007-2008 are compared with surveys of pregnant (n = 147) and lactating women (n = 60) one to two years post-fortification in a regional area of New South Wales, Australia. A self-administered questionnaire was completed and dietary intake of iodine was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire. A generally poor knowledge about the role and sources of iodine in the diet remained after fortification. Post-fortification, iodine-containing supplements were being taken by 60% (up from 20% pre-fortification) and 45% of pregnant and lactating women, respectively. Dairy foods were the highest contributors to dietary iodine intake (57%-62%). A low intake of fish and seafood resulted in this food group contributing only 3%-8% of total intake. A low level of public awareness regarding the role of iodine in health supports the need for public health strategies in addition to fortification, such as an accompanying consumer education campaign, increased uptake of supplementation, and on-going monitoring.

Show MeSH