Limits...
Intake of dairy products in relation to periodontitis in older Danish adults.

Adegboye AR, Christensen LB, Holm-Pedersen P, Avlund K, Boucher BJ, Heitmann BL - Nutrients (2012)

Bottom Line: Intakes of total dairy calcium (Incidence-rate ratio (IRR) = 0.97; p = 0.021), calcium from milk (IRR = 0.97; p = 0.025) and fermented foods (IRR = 0.96; p = 0.03) were inversely and significantly associated with periodontitis after adjustment for age, gender, education, sucrose intake, alcohol consumption, smoking, physical activity, vitamin D intake, heart disease, visits to the dentist, use of dental floss and bleeding on probing, but non-dairy calcium, calcium from cheese and other types of dairy food intakes were not.Total dairy foods (IRR = 0.96; p = 0.003), milk (IRR = 0.96; p = 0.028) and fermented foods intakes (IRR = 0.97; p = 0.029) were associated with reduced risk of periodontitis, but cheese and other dairy foods intakes were not.Prospective studies are required to confirm these findings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Unit for Dietary Studies, Institute of Preventive Medicine, Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. AAR@ipm.regionh.dk

ABSTRACT
This cross-sectional study investigates whether calcium intakes from dairy and non-dairy sources, and absolute intakes of various dairy products, are associated with periodontitis. The calcium intake (mg/day) of 135 older Danish adults was estimated by a diet history interview and divided into dairy and non-dairy calcium. Dairy food intake (g/day) was classified into four groups: milk, cheese, fermented foods and other foods. Periodontitis was defined as the number of teeth with attachment loss ≥3 mm. Intakes of total dairy calcium (Incidence-rate ratio (IRR) = 0.97; p = 0.021), calcium from milk (IRR = 0.97; p = 0.025) and fermented foods (IRR = 0.96; p = 0.03) were inversely and significantly associated with periodontitis after adjustment for age, gender, education, sucrose intake, alcohol consumption, smoking, physical activity, vitamin D intake, heart disease, visits to the dentist, use of dental floss and bleeding on probing, but non-dairy calcium, calcium from cheese and other types of dairy food intakes were not. Total dairy foods (IRR = 0.96; p = 0.003), milk (IRR = 0.96; p = 0.028) and fermented foods intakes (IRR = 0.97; p = 0.029) were associated with reduced risk of periodontitis, but cheese and other dairy foods intakes were not. These results suggest that dairy calcium, particularly from milk and fermented products, may protect against periodontitis. Prospective studies are required to confirm these findings.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow chart for participants in the Copenhagen Oral Health Senior Study.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3475232&req=5

nutrients-04-01219-f001: Flow chart for participants in the Copenhagen Oral Health Senior Study.

Mentions: The sub-group for the present study was composed of the 135 individuals, who comprised a subset of the 783 who went through a diet history interview and had a periodontal examination, as well as complete information on all relevant covariates (Figure 1). Participants from this subset, and those not participating in the periodontal examination did not differ with respect to age, gender, education, smoking, sucrose consumption or the use of dental floss. However, the non-participants tended to have higher alcohol consumption and fewer visits to the dentist (p < 0.05) compared to the participants from the subset.


Intake of dairy products in relation to periodontitis in older Danish adults.

Adegboye AR, Christensen LB, Holm-Pedersen P, Avlund K, Boucher BJ, Heitmann BL - Nutrients (2012)

Flow chart for participants in the Copenhagen Oral Health Senior Study.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3475232&req=5

nutrients-04-01219-f001: Flow chart for participants in the Copenhagen Oral Health Senior Study.
Mentions: The sub-group for the present study was composed of the 135 individuals, who comprised a subset of the 783 who went through a diet history interview and had a periodontal examination, as well as complete information on all relevant covariates (Figure 1). Participants from this subset, and those not participating in the periodontal examination did not differ with respect to age, gender, education, smoking, sucrose consumption or the use of dental floss. However, the non-participants tended to have higher alcohol consumption and fewer visits to the dentist (p < 0.05) compared to the participants from the subset.

Bottom Line: Intakes of total dairy calcium (Incidence-rate ratio (IRR) = 0.97; p = 0.021), calcium from milk (IRR = 0.97; p = 0.025) and fermented foods (IRR = 0.96; p = 0.03) were inversely and significantly associated with periodontitis after adjustment for age, gender, education, sucrose intake, alcohol consumption, smoking, physical activity, vitamin D intake, heart disease, visits to the dentist, use of dental floss and bleeding on probing, but non-dairy calcium, calcium from cheese and other types of dairy food intakes were not.Total dairy foods (IRR = 0.96; p = 0.003), milk (IRR = 0.96; p = 0.028) and fermented foods intakes (IRR = 0.97; p = 0.029) were associated with reduced risk of periodontitis, but cheese and other dairy foods intakes were not.Prospective studies are required to confirm these findings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Unit for Dietary Studies, Institute of Preventive Medicine, Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. AAR@ipm.regionh.dk

ABSTRACT
This cross-sectional study investigates whether calcium intakes from dairy and non-dairy sources, and absolute intakes of various dairy products, are associated with periodontitis. The calcium intake (mg/day) of 135 older Danish adults was estimated by a diet history interview and divided into dairy and non-dairy calcium. Dairy food intake (g/day) was classified into four groups: milk, cheese, fermented foods and other foods. Periodontitis was defined as the number of teeth with attachment loss ≥3 mm. Intakes of total dairy calcium (Incidence-rate ratio (IRR) = 0.97; p = 0.021), calcium from milk (IRR = 0.97; p = 0.025) and fermented foods (IRR = 0.96; p = 0.03) were inversely and significantly associated with periodontitis after adjustment for age, gender, education, sucrose intake, alcohol consumption, smoking, physical activity, vitamin D intake, heart disease, visits to the dentist, use of dental floss and bleeding on probing, but non-dairy calcium, calcium from cheese and other types of dairy food intakes were not. Total dairy foods (IRR = 0.96; p = 0.003), milk (IRR = 0.96; p = 0.028) and fermented foods intakes (IRR = 0.97; p = 0.029) were associated with reduced risk of periodontitis, but cheese and other dairy foods intakes were not. These results suggest that dairy calcium, particularly from milk and fermented products, may protect against periodontitis. Prospective studies are required to confirm these findings.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus