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Assessing the relationship between vitamin D3 and stratum corneum hydration for the treatment of xerotic skin.

Russell M - Nutrients (2012)

Bottom Line: Eighty three subjects were recruited and blood serum levels and skin conductance measurements were taken after a one week washout.Topical supplementation with cholecalciferol significantly increased measurements of skin moisturization and resulted in improvements in subjective clinical grading of dry skin.Taken together our finding suggest a relationship between serum vitamin D(3) (25(OH)D) levels and hydration of the stratum corneum and further demonstrate the skin moisture benefit from topical application of vitamin D(3).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Johnson and Johnson Skin Research Center, CPPW, Johnson & Johnson Consumer Companies, Inc., Skillman, NJ 08558, USA. mrusse2@its.jnj.com

ABSTRACT
Vitamin D(3) has been called the "sunshine" vitamin since the formation of vitamin D is mediated by exposure to sunlight. Vitamin D(3) is linked to many health benefits, however serum levels of vitamin D(3) have been decreasing over the last few decades and the lower levels of vitamin D(3) may have consequences on normal physiology. We investigated the association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels and stratum corneum conductance as well as the effect of topical application of cholecalciferol (vitamin D(3)) on dry skin. Eighty three subjects were recruited and blood serum levels and skin conductance measurements were taken after a one week washout. A correlation was observed between vitamin D levels and skin moisture content, individuals with lower levels of vitamin D had lower average skin moisture. Subsequently, a 3-week split leg, randomized, vehicle controlled clinical study was conducted on a subset of 61 of the above individuals who were identified with non-sufficient vitamin D serum levels. Topical supplementation with cholecalciferol significantly increased measurements of skin moisturization and resulted in improvements in subjective clinical grading of dry skin. Taken together our finding suggest a relationship between serum vitamin D(3) (25(OH)D) levels and hydration of the stratum corneum and further demonstrate the skin moisture benefit from topical application of vitamin D(3).

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean change at week 3 from baseline for (a) skin conductivity; (b) clinical grading of visual dryness; (c) subject perception of visual skin dryness; and (d) subject perception of overall dryness. A subset of non-sufficient-vitamin D (OH) serum subjects was analyzed. The addition of vitamin D to a moisturizing formula significantly (Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test, p < 0.05) improved clinical grading of visual dryness and consumer perception of flakiness and dryness over the moisturizing formula alone. There was a trend in vitamin D over the vehicle in skin conductivity.
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nutrients-04-01213-f002: Mean change at week 3 from baseline for (a) skin conductivity; (b) clinical grading of visual dryness; (c) subject perception of visual skin dryness; and (d) subject perception of overall dryness. A subset of non-sufficient-vitamin D (OH) serum subjects was analyzed. The addition of vitamin D to a moisturizing formula significantly (Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test, p < 0.05) improved clinical grading of visual dryness and consumer perception of flakiness and dryness over the moisturizing formula alone. There was a trend in vitamin D over the vehicle in skin conductivity.

Mentions: In the subset of subjects with non-sufficient vitamin D3 levels, (n = 61 including those deficient and insufficient), the addition of vitamin D3 to the moisturizing formulation significantly improved (p < 0.05 Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test) dryness both in clinical grading and by self assessment over the vehicle at 3 weeks (Figure 2b,d). The look of flakes was also statistically significant (p < 0.05 Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test) by self assessment (Figure 2c). Vitamin D3 addition to a topical moisturizer increased skin conductance over the vehicle, but did not reach statistical significance in this study utilizing ANOVA (Figure 2a). There was a significant increase in conductance when comparing before and after treatment in both groups. This is probably due to the high emolliency of the vehicle used.


Assessing the relationship between vitamin D3 and stratum corneum hydration for the treatment of xerotic skin.

Russell M - Nutrients (2012)

Mean change at week 3 from baseline for (a) skin conductivity; (b) clinical grading of visual dryness; (c) subject perception of visual skin dryness; and (d) subject perception of overall dryness. A subset of non-sufficient-vitamin D (OH) serum subjects was analyzed. The addition of vitamin D to a moisturizing formula significantly (Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test, p < 0.05) improved clinical grading of visual dryness and consumer perception of flakiness and dryness over the moisturizing formula alone. There was a trend in vitamin D over the vehicle in skin conductivity.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3475231&req=5

nutrients-04-01213-f002: Mean change at week 3 from baseline for (a) skin conductivity; (b) clinical grading of visual dryness; (c) subject perception of visual skin dryness; and (d) subject perception of overall dryness. A subset of non-sufficient-vitamin D (OH) serum subjects was analyzed. The addition of vitamin D to a moisturizing formula significantly (Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test, p < 0.05) improved clinical grading of visual dryness and consumer perception of flakiness and dryness over the moisturizing formula alone. There was a trend in vitamin D over the vehicle in skin conductivity.
Mentions: In the subset of subjects with non-sufficient vitamin D3 levels, (n = 61 including those deficient and insufficient), the addition of vitamin D3 to the moisturizing formulation significantly improved (p < 0.05 Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test) dryness both in clinical grading and by self assessment over the vehicle at 3 weeks (Figure 2b,d). The look of flakes was also statistically significant (p < 0.05 Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test) by self assessment (Figure 2c). Vitamin D3 addition to a topical moisturizer increased skin conductance over the vehicle, but did not reach statistical significance in this study utilizing ANOVA (Figure 2a). There was a significant increase in conductance when comparing before and after treatment in both groups. This is probably due to the high emolliency of the vehicle used.

Bottom Line: Eighty three subjects were recruited and blood serum levels and skin conductance measurements were taken after a one week washout.Topical supplementation with cholecalciferol significantly increased measurements of skin moisturization and resulted in improvements in subjective clinical grading of dry skin.Taken together our finding suggest a relationship between serum vitamin D(3) (25(OH)D) levels and hydration of the stratum corneum and further demonstrate the skin moisture benefit from topical application of vitamin D(3).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Johnson and Johnson Skin Research Center, CPPW, Johnson & Johnson Consumer Companies, Inc., Skillman, NJ 08558, USA. mrusse2@its.jnj.com

ABSTRACT
Vitamin D(3) has been called the "sunshine" vitamin since the formation of vitamin D is mediated by exposure to sunlight. Vitamin D(3) is linked to many health benefits, however serum levels of vitamin D(3) have been decreasing over the last few decades and the lower levels of vitamin D(3) may have consequences on normal physiology. We investigated the association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels and stratum corneum conductance as well as the effect of topical application of cholecalciferol (vitamin D(3)) on dry skin. Eighty three subjects were recruited and blood serum levels and skin conductance measurements were taken after a one week washout. A correlation was observed between vitamin D levels and skin moisture content, individuals with lower levels of vitamin D had lower average skin moisture. Subsequently, a 3-week split leg, randomized, vehicle controlled clinical study was conducted on a subset of 61 of the above individuals who were identified with non-sufficient vitamin D serum levels. Topical supplementation with cholecalciferol significantly increased measurements of skin moisturization and resulted in improvements in subjective clinical grading of dry skin. Taken together our finding suggest a relationship between serum vitamin D(3) (25(OH)D) levels and hydration of the stratum corneum and further demonstrate the skin moisture benefit from topical application of vitamin D(3).

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus