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Pedometer determined physical activity tracks in African American adults: the Jackson Heart Study.

Newton RL, M HH, Dubbert PM, Johnson WD, Hickson DA, Ainsworth B, Carithers T, Taylor H, Wyatt S, Tudor-Locke C - Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act (2012)

Bottom Line: The current study shows that an overall mean steps/day estimate based on a 3-day monitoring period did not differ significantly over 4 - 6 months.The findings were robust to differences in sex, age, and BMI categories.A single 3-day monitoring period is sufficient to capture habitual physical activity in African American adults.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA, USA. Catrine.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study investigated the number of pedometer assessment occasions required to establish habitual physical activity in African American adults.

Methods: African American adults (mean age 59.9 ± 0.60 years; 59 % female) enrolled in the Diet and Physical Activity Substudy of the Jackson Heart Study wore Yamax pedometers during 3-day monitoring periods, assessed on two to three distinct occasions, each separated by approximately one month. The stability of pedometer measured PA was described as differences in mean steps/day across time, as intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) by sex, age, and body mass index (BMI) category, and as percent of participants changing steps/day quartiles across time.

Results: Valid data were obtained for 270 participants on either two or three different assessment occasions. Mean steps/day were not significantly different across assessment occasions (p values > 0.456). The overall ICCs for steps/day assessed on either two or three occasions were 0.57 and 0.76, respectively. In addition, 85 % (two assessment occasions) and 76 % (three assessment occasions) of all participants remained in the same steps/day quartile or changed one quartile over time.

Conclusion: The current study shows that an overall mean steps/day estimate based on a 3-day monitoring period did not differ significantly over 4 - 6 months. The findings were robust to differences in sex, age, and BMI categories. A single 3-day monitoring period is sufficient to capture habitual physical activity in African American adults.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Stability/instability in steps/day for JHS participants with a) two or b) three valid assessment occasions .Legend: Participants who remained in the same steps/day quartile across the valid assessment occasions were considered ‘stable’, those who changed one quartile were considered ‘moderately stable’, those who changed two quartiles were considered ‘moderately unstable’, and those who changed three quartiles were considered ‘unstable.’.
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Figure 1: Stability/instability in steps/day for JHS participants with a) two or b) three valid assessment occasions .Legend: Participants who remained in the same steps/day quartile across the valid assessment occasions were considered ‘stable’, those who changed one quartile were considered ‘moderately stable’, those who changed two quartiles were considered ‘moderately unstable’, and those who changed three quartiles were considered ‘unstable.’.

Mentions: Figure 1 illustrates the quartile analysis. Approximately 85 % and 76 % of the participants with two and three valid assessment occasions, respectively, were at least “moderately stable” (remained in the same steps/day quartile or changed one quartile across time) in their activity. The proportion of participants who became more active was equal to the proportion who became less active for both two (p = .636) and three (p = .710) valid assessment occasions.


Pedometer determined physical activity tracks in African American adults: the Jackson Heart Study.

Newton RL, M HH, Dubbert PM, Johnson WD, Hickson DA, Ainsworth B, Carithers T, Taylor H, Wyatt S, Tudor-Locke C - Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act (2012)

Stability/instability in steps/day for JHS participants with a) two or b) three valid assessment occasions .Legend: Participants who remained in the same steps/day quartile across the valid assessment occasions were considered ‘stable’, those who changed one quartile were considered ‘moderately stable’, those who changed two quartiles were considered ‘moderately unstable’, and those who changed three quartiles were considered ‘unstable.’.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3475137&req=5

Figure 1: Stability/instability in steps/day for JHS participants with a) two or b) three valid assessment occasions .Legend: Participants who remained in the same steps/day quartile across the valid assessment occasions were considered ‘stable’, those who changed one quartile were considered ‘moderately stable’, those who changed two quartiles were considered ‘moderately unstable’, and those who changed three quartiles were considered ‘unstable.’.
Mentions: Figure 1 illustrates the quartile analysis. Approximately 85 % and 76 % of the participants with two and three valid assessment occasions, respectively, were at least “moderately stable” (remained in the same steps/day quartile or changed one quartile across time) in their activity. The proportion of participants who became more active was equal to the proportion who became less active for both two (p = .636) and three (p = .710) valid assessment occasions.

Bottom Line: The current study shows that an overall mean steps/day estimate based on a 3-day monitoring period did not differ significantly over 4 - 6 months.The findings were robust to differences in sex, age, and BMI categories.A single 3-day monitoring period is sufficient to capture habitual physical activity in African American adults.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA, USA. Catrine.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study investigated the number of pedometer assessment occasions required to establish habitual physical activity in African American adults.

Methods: African American adults (mean age 59.9 ± 0.60 years; 59 % female) enrolled in the Diet and Physical Activity Substudy of the Jackson Heart Study wore Yamax pedometers during 3-day monitoring periods, assessed on two to three distinct occasions, each separated by approximately one month. The stability of pedometer measured PA was described as differences in mean steps/day across time, as intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) by sex, age, and body mass index (BMI) category, and as percent of participants changing steps/day quartiles across time.

Results: Valid data were obtained for 270 participants on either two or three different assessment occasions. Mean steps/day were not significantly different across assessment occasions (p values > 0.456). The overall ICCs for steps/day assessed on either two or three occasions were 0.57 and 0.76, respectively. In addition, 85 % (two assessment occasions) and 76 % (three assessment occasions) of all participants remained in the same steps/day quartile or changed one quartile over time.

Conclusion: The current study shows that an overall mean steps/day estimate based on a 3-day monitoring period did not differ significantly over 4 - 6 months. The findings were robust to differences in sex, age, and BMI categories. A single 3-day monitoring period is sufficient to capture habitual physical activity in African American adults.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus