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Dynamic-load-enabled ultra-low power multiple-state RRAM devices.

Yang X, Chen IW - Sci Rep (2012)

Bottom Line: Bipolar resistance-switching materials allowing intermediate states of wide-varying resistance values hold the potential of drastically reduced power for non-volatile memory.This approach is entirely scalable and applicable to other bipolar RRAM with intermediate states.The projected power is 12 nW for a 100 × 100 nm(2) device and 500 pW for a 10 × 10 nm(2) device.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6272, USA.

ABSTRACT
Bipolar resistance-switching materials allowing intermediate states of wide-varying resistance values hold the potential of drastically reduced power for non-volatile memory. To exploit this potential, we have introduced into a nanometallic resistance-random-access-memory (RRAM) device an asymmetric dynamic load, which can reliably lower switching power by orders of magnitude. The dynamic load is highly resistive during on-switching allowing access to the highly resistive intermediate states; during off-switching the load vanishes to enable switching at low voltage. This approach is entirely scalable and applicable to other bipolar RRAM with intermediate states. The projected power is 12 nW for a 100 × 100 nm(2) device and 500 pW for a 10 × 10 nm(2) device. The dynamic range of the load can be increased to allow power to be further decreased by taking advantage of the exponential decay of wave-function in a newly discovered nanometallic random material, reaching possibly 1 pW for a 10×10 nm(2) nanometallic RRAM device.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Equivalent circuits of (a) RRAM device consisting of cell resistor Rc and load resistor Rl.(b) cell resistor consisting of low-resistance cross section (rL per area, area fraction F) and high resistance cross section (rH per area, area fraction 1-F), (c) dynamic load consisting of parallel diode Rd and external resistor Rex. Inset of (b): schematic F(Vc) and dF/dVc depicting on-switching and off-switching.
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f2: Equivalent circuits of (a) RRAM device consisting of cell resistor Rc and load resistor Rl.(b) cell resistor consisting of low-resistance cross section (rL per area, area fraction F) and high resistance cross section (rH per area, area fraction 1-F), (c) dynamic load consisting of parallel diode Rd and external resistor Rex. Inset of (b): schematic F(Vc) and dF/dVc depicting on-switching and off-switching.

Mentions: We begin by treating a RRAM device as a serial connection of a cell resistance Rc and a load resistance Rl, see Figure 2a. The latter may come from word/bit lines, electrodes and interfaces. Depending on the configuration Rl may or may not be inversely proportional to the cell size or area. (For example, the spreading resistance of a very thin bottom-electrode substrate is logarithmically dependent on the reciprocal cell size.) We next designate the critical cell-switching voltage Vc* as a characteristic of cell material. The intrinsic switching power is thus per cell. However, since the device-switching voltage V* equals (1+Δ)Vc*, where , the device-switching power P must exceed Pc*. Indeed, .


Dynamic-load-enabled ultra-low power multiple-state RRAM devices.

Yang X, Chen IW - Sci Rep (2012)

Equivalent circuits of (a) RRAM device consisting of cell resistor Rc and load resistor Rl.(b) cell resistor consisting of low-resistance cross section (rL per area, area fraction F) and high resistance cross section (rH per area, area fraction 1-F), (c) dynamic load consisting of parallel diode Rd and external resistor Rex. Inset of (b): schematic F(Vc) and dF/dVc depicting on-switching and off-switching.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3473363&req=5

f2: Equivalent circuits of (a) RRAM device consisting of cell resistor Rc and load resistor Rl.(b) cell resistor consisting of low-resistance cross section (rL per area, area fraction F) and high resistance cross section (rH per area, area fraction 1-F), (c) dynamic load consisting of parallel diode Rd and external resistor Rex. Inset of (b): schematic F(Vc) and dF/dVc depicting on-switching and off-switching.
Mentions: We begin by treating a RRAM device as a serial connection of a cell resistance Rc and a load resistance Rl, see Figure 2a. The latter may come from word/bit lines, electrodes and interfaces. Depending on the configuration Rl may or may not be inversely proportional to the cell size or area. (For example, the spreading resistance of a very thin bottom-electrode substrate is logarithmically dependent on the reciprocal cell size.) We next designate the critical cell-switching voltage Vc* as a characteristic of cell material. The intrinsic switching power is thus per cell. However, since the device-switching voltage V* equals (1+Δ)Vc*, where , the device-switching power P must exceed Pc*. Indeed, .

Bottom Line: Bipolar resistance-switching materials allowing intermediate states of wide-varying resistance values hold the potential of drastically reduced power for non-volatile memory.This approach is entirely scalable and applicable to other bipolar RRAM with intermediate states.The projected power is 12 nW for a 100 × 100 nm(2) device and 500 pW for a 10 × 10 nm(2) device.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6272, USA.

ABSTRACT
Bipolar resistance-switching materials allowing intermediate states of wide-varying resistance values hold the potential of drastically reduced power for non-volatile memory. To exploit this potential, we have introduced into a nanometallic resistance-random-access-memory (RRAM) device an asymmetric dynamic load, which can reliably lower switching power by orders of magnitude. The dynamic load is highly resistive during on-switching allowing access to the highly resistive intermediate states; during off-switching the load vanishes to enable switching at low voltage. This approach is entirely scalable and applicable to other bipolar RRAM with intermediate states. The projected power is 12 nW for a 100 × 100 nm(2) device and 500 pW for a 10 × 10 nm(2) device. The dynamic range of the load can be increased to allow power to be further decreased by taking advantage of the exponential decay of wave-function in a newly discovered nanometallic random material, reaching possibly 1 pW for a 10×10 nm(2) nanometallic RRAM device.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus