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An ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants used in Terai forest of western Nepal.

Singh AG, Kumar A, Tewari DD - J Ethnobiol Ethnomed (2012)

Bottom Line: Acacia catechu, Bacopa monnieri, Bombax ceiba, Drymaria diandra, Rauvolfia serpentina, and Tribulus terrestris are threatened species which needs to be conserved for future use.The high degree of consensus among the informants suggests that current use and knowledge are still strong, and thus the preservation of today's knowledge shows good foresight in acting before much has been lost.The connections between plant use and conservation are also important ones, especially as the authors note that neither the local inhabitants nor the government is addressing the potential loss of valuable species in this region.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Botany, Butwal Multiple Campus, Tribhuvan University, Tribhuvan, Nepal. agsingh26@rediffmail.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Nepal Himalayas have been known as a rich source for valuable medicinal plants since Vedic periods. Present work is the documentation of indigenous knowledge on plant utilization as natural remedy by the inhabitants of terai forest in Western Nepal.

Methods: Study was conducted during 2010-2011 following standard ethnobotanical methods. Data about medicinal uses of plants were collected by questionnaire, personal interview and group discussion with pre identified informants. Voucher specimens were collected with the help of informants, processed into herbarium following standard methods, identified with the help of pertinent floras and taxonomic experts, and submitted in Department of Botany, Butwal Multiple Campus, Tribhuvan University, Nepal for future references.

Results: During the present study 66 medicinal plant species belonging to 37 families and 60 genera has been documented. These plants were used to treat various diseases and ailments grouped under 11 disease categories, with the highest number of species (41) being used for gastro-intestinal disorders, followed by dermatological disorders (34). In the study area the informants' consensus about usages of medicinal plants ranges from 0.93 to 0.97 with an average value of 0.94. Herbs (53%) were the primary source of medicine, followed by trees (23%). Curcuma longa (84%) and Azadirachta indica (76%) are the most frequently and popularly used medicinal plant species in the study area. Acacia catechu, Bacopa monnieri, Bombax ceiba, Drymaria diandra, Rauvolfia serpentina, and Tribulus terrestris are threatened species which needs to be conserved for future use.

Conclusions: The high degree of consensus among the informants suggests that current use and knowledge are still strong, and thus the preservation of today's knowledge shows good foresight in acting before much has been lost. The connections between plant use and conservation are also important ones, especially as the authors note that neither the local inhabitants nor the government is addressing the potential loss of valuable species in this region.

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Location map of study site.
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Figure 1: Location map of study site.

Mentions: Rupandehi district is situated in the Terai region of western Nepal. It lies between 83027'.955" to 83028'.255" E and 27040'.016" to 27040'.252" N geographical limits in 1360 Km2 area at altitudinal variation from 105 to 258 meters. Rupandehi district (Figure 1) is surrounded by hilly districts (Palpa and Arghakhanchi) in North, by Mahrajganj district of Uttar Pradesh (India) in south, by Nawalparasi district in East and by Kapilvastu district in west. It has tropical climate with maximum temperature beyond 400C during summer (May- June) and below 100C during winter (December- January) and annual rainfall is about 1250 mm. Geographically, it is divided into Chure region (14.5%); Bhabar region (0.6%) and Terai region (84.9%). The famous river and rivulets of this district are Tinau, Rohini, Danaw, Pahela, Kanchan, Kothi, Danda, Koili etc. All the rivers flow from north to south. The climatic condition of the study site is tropical type and predominated by Sal forest. The forest area of the district is divided into community forest, religious forest and personal forest [31]. The vegetation of the study is dominated by sal (Shorea robusta) forest along with sissoo (Dalbergia sissoo), saj (Terminalia alata) khayar (Acacia catechu), baheda (Terminalia bellirica), dabdabe (Garuga pinnata), khaniyu (Ficus semicordata), asuro (Justica adhatoda), dhaiyaro (Woodfordia fruticosa), and titepati (Artemesia indica) etc. The main highway Siddhartha Rajmarga runs from the middle part of Shankar Nagar VDC. All the parts of Shankar Nagar VDC and its surrounding areas are interconnected by network of road and are easily accessible for the field visits.


An ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants used in Terai forest of western Nepal.

Singh AG, Kumar A, Tewari DD - J Ethnobiol Ethnomed (2012)

Location map of study site.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3473258&req=5

Figure 1: Location map of study site.
Mentions: Rupandehi district is situated in the Terai region of western Nepal. It lies between 83027'.955" to 83028'.255" E and 27040'.016" to 27040'.252" N geographical limits in 1360 Km2 area at altitudinal variation from 105 to 258 meters. Rupandehi district (Figure 1) is surrounded by hilly districts (Palpa and Arghakhanchi) in North, by Mahrajganj district of Uttar Pradesh (India) in south, by Nawalparasi district in East and by Kapilvastu district in west. It has tropical climate with maximum temperature beyond 400C during summer (May- June) and below 100C during winter (December- January) and annual rainfall is about 1250 mm. Geographically, it is divided into Chure region (14.5%); Bhabar region (0.6%) and Terai region (84.9%). The famous river and rivulets of this district are Tinau, Rohini, Danaw, Pahela, Kanchan, Kothi, Danda, Koili etc. All the rivers flow from north to south. The climatic condition of the study site is tropical type and predominated by Sal forest. The forest area of the district is divided into community forest, religious forest and personal forest [31]. The vegetation of the study is dominated by sal (Shorea robusta) forest along with sissoo (Dalbergia sissoo), saj (Terminalia alata) khayar (Acacia catechu), baheda (Terminalia bellirica), dabdabe (Garuga pinnata), khaniyu (Ficus semicordata), asuro (Justica adhatoda), dhaiyaro (Woodfordia fruticosa), and titepati (Artemesia indica) etc. The main highway Siddhartha Rajmarga runs from the middle part of Shankar Nagar VDC. All the parts of Shankar Nagar VDC and its surrounding areas are interconnected by network of road and are easily accessible for the field visits.

Bottom Line: Acacia catechu, Bacopa monnieri, Bombax ceiba, Drymaria diandra, Rauvolfia serpentina, and Tribulus terrestris are threatened species which needs to be conserved for future use.The high degree of consensus among the informants suggests that current use and knowledge are still strong, and thus the preservation of today's knowledge shows good foresight in acting before much has been lost.The connections between plant use and conservation are also important ones, especially as the authors note that neither the local inhabitants nor the government is addressing the potential loss of valuable species in this region.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Botany, Butwal Multiple Campus, Tribhuvan University, Tribhuvan, Nepal. agsingh26@rediffmail.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Nepal Himalayas have been known as a rich source for valuable medicinal plants since Vedic periods. Present work is the documentation of indigenous knowledge on plant utilization as natural remedy by the inhabitants of terai forest in Western Nepal.

Methods: Study was conducted during 2010-2011 following standard ethnobotanical methods. Data about medicinal uses of plants were collected by questionnaire, personal interview and group discussion with pre identified informants. Voucher specimens were collected with the help of informants, processed into herbarium following standard methods, identified with the help of pertinent floras and taxonomic experts, and submitted in Department of Botany, Butwal Multiple Campus, Tribhuvan University, Nepal for future references.

Results: During the present study 66 medicinal plant species belonging to 37 families and 60 genera has been documented. These plants were used to treat various diseases and ailments grouped under 11 disease categories, with the highest number of species (41) being used for gastro-intestinal disorders, followed by dermatological disorders (34). In the study area the informants' consensus about usages of medicinal plants ranges from 0.93 to 0.97 with an average value of 0.94. Herbs (53%) were the primary source of medicine, followed by trees (23%). Curcuma longa (84%) and Azadirachta indica (76%) are the most frequently and popularly used medicinal plant species in the study area. Acacia catechu, Bacopa monnieri, Bombax ceiba, Drymaria diandra, Rauvolfia serpentina, and Tribulus terrestris are threatened species which needs to be conserved for future use.

Conclusions: The high degree of consensus among the informants suggests that current use and knowledge are still strong, and thus the preservation of today's knowledge shows good foresight in acting before much has been lost. The connections between plant use and conservation are also important ones, especially as the authors note that neither the local inhabitants nor the government is addressing the potential loss of valuable species in this region.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus