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Retrograde tracing and toe spreading after experimental autologous nerve transplantation and crush injury of the sciatic nerve: a descriptive methodological study.

van Neerven SG, Bozkurt A, O'Dey DM, Scheffel J, Boecker AH, Stromps JP, Dunda S, Brook GA, Pallua N - J Brachial Plex Peripher Nerve Inj (2012)

Bottom Line: In contrast to CI animals, ANT animals did not reach pre-surgical levels of toe spreading.After the observation period, the lipophilic dye DiI was applied to label sensory and motor neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRG; sensory neurons) and spinal cord (motor neurons), respectively.No statistical difference in motor or sensory neuron counts could be detected between ANT and CI animals.In the present study we could indicate that there was no direct relationship between functional recovery (toe spreading) measured by SSI and the number of labelled (motor and sensory) neurons evaluated by retrograde tracing.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plastic Surgery, Reconstructive and Hand Surgery, Burn Center, Medical Faculty, RWTH Aachen University, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen, Germany. svanneerven@ukaachen.de.

ABSTRACT
Evaluation of functional and structural recovery after peripheral nerve injury is crucial to determine the therapeutic effect of a nerve repair strategy. In the present study, we examined the relationship between the structural evaluation of regeneration by means of retrograde tracing and the functional analysis of toe spreading. Two standardized rat sciatic nerve injury models were used to address this relationship. As such, animals received either a 2 cm sciatic nerve defect (neurotmesis) followed by autologous nerve transplantation (ANT animals) or a crush injury with spontaneous recovery (axonotmesis; CI animals). Functional recovery of toe spreading was observed over an observation period of 84 days. In contrast to CI animals, ANT animals did not reach pre-surgical levels of toe spreading. After the observation period, the lipophilic dye DiI was applied to label sensory and motor neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRG; sensory neurons) and spinal cord (motor neurons), respectively. No statistical difference in motor or sensory neuron counts could be detected between ANT and CI animals.In the present study we could indicate that there was no direct relationship between functional recovery (toe spreading) measured by SSI and the number of labelled (motor and sensory) neurons evaluated by retrograde tracing. The present findings demonstrate that a multimodal approach with a variety of independent evaluation tools is essential to understand and estimate the therapeutic benefit of a nerve repair strategy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Functional regeneration after rat sciatic nerve injury. Original pictures, demonstrating the plantar surface view of the rat’s hind paws. Left hind paw represents the healthy (contralateral) paw, and right hind paw (ipsilateral) the operated side (The camera inverted the view on the animal, A-D). Accordingly paw print parameters were analyzed by measuring toe spread factor (TSF) digits 1–5, and intermediate toe spread factor (ITSF) digits 2–4. Typically the posture of the ipsilateral paw is devoid of any toe spreading during the first week after sciatic nerve injury (A, C). At 84 dpo toe spreading was significantly improved in both groups (B, D), but the ANT group did not reach pre-surgical values.
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Figure 1: Functional regeneration after rat sciatic nerve injury. Original pictures, demonstrating the plantar surface view of the rat’s hind paws. Left hind paw represents the healthy (contralateral) paw, and right hind paw (ipsilateral) the operated side (The camera inverted the view on the animal, A-D). Accordingly paw print parameters were analyzed by measuring toe spread factor (TSF) digits 1–5, and intermediate toe spread factor (ITSF) digits 2–4. Typically the posture of the ipsilateral paw is devoid of any toe spreading during the first week after sciatic nerve injury (A, C). At 84 dpo toe spreading was significantly improved in both groups (B, D), but the ANT group did not reach pre-surgical values.

Mentions: Functional regeneration was analysed by measuring toe spreading and calculation of toe spread factor (TSF) and intermediate toe spread factor (ITSF) of the left (contralateral to the lesion site) and right (ipsilateral to the lesion site) paws of animals after ANT or CI (Table 1). One week after surgery, both groups (ANT and CI animals) showed loss of toe spreading (Figure 1A, C). During the observation period, toe spreading improved significantly over time (Figure 1B, D and Table 1). Although improvement was substantial, the ANT group did not reach pre-surgical levels of toe spreading at the end of the observation period (Table 1, pre-operative: TSF:−0.03 ± 0.03 ITSF:−0.06 ±0.05 and 84 dpo: TSF:−0.45 ±0.04, ITSF:−0.26 ± 0.05). In contrast, positive control CI animals recovered completely from injury (Table 1, pre-operative: TSF:−0.01 ± 0.04 ITSF:−0.03 ± 0.05 and 84 dpo: TSF: 0.03 ± 0.04, ITSF:−0.02 ± 0.05, p<0.01).


Retrograde tracing and toe spreading after experimental autologous nerve transplantation and crush injury of the sciatic nerve: a descriptive methodological study.

van Neerven SG, Bozkurt A, O'Dey DM, Scheffel J, Boecker AH, Stromps JP, Dunda S, Brook GA, Pallua N - J Brachial Plex Peripher Nerve Inj (2012)

Functional regeneration after rat sciatic nerve injury. Original pictures, demonstrating the plantar surface view of the rat’s hind paws. Left hind paw represents the healthy (contralateral) paw, and right hind paw (ipsilateral) the operated side (The camera inverted the view on the animal, A-D). Accordingly paw print parameters were analyzed by measuring toe spread factor (TSF) digits 1–5, and intermediate toe spread factor (ITSF) digits 2–4. Typically the posture of the ipsilateral paw is devoid of any toe spreading during the first week after sciatic nerve injury (A, C). At 84 dpo toe spreading was significantly improved in both groups (B, D), but the ANT group did not reach pre-surgical values.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3473253&req=5

Figure 1: Functional regeneration after rat sciatic nerve injury. Original pictures, demonstrating the plantar surface view of the rat’s hind paws. Left hind paw represents the healthy (contralateral) paw, and right hind paw (ipsilateral) the operated side (The camera inverted the view on the animal, A-D). Accordingly paw print parameters were analyzed by measuring toe spread factor (TSF) digits 1–5, and intermediate toe spread factor (ITSF) digits 2–4. Typically the posture of the ipsilateral paw is devoid of any toe spreading during the first week after sciatic nerve injury (A, C). At 84 dpo toe spreading was significantly improved in both groups (B, D), but the ANT group did not reach pre-surgical values.
Mentions: Functional regeneration was analysed by measuring toe spreading and calculation of toe spread factor (TSF) and intermediate toe spread factor (ITSF) of the left (contralateral to the lesion site) and right (ipsilateral to the lesion site) paws of animals after ANT or CI (Table 1). One week after surgery, both groups (ANT and CI animals) showed loss of toe spreading (Figure 1A, C). During the observation period, toe spreading improved significantly over time (Figure 1B, D and Table 1). Although improvement was substantial, the ANT group did not reach pre-surgical levels of toe spreading at the end of the observation period (Table 1, pre-operative: TSF:−0.03 ± 0.03 ITSF:−0.06 ±0.05 and 84 dpo: TSF:−0.45 ±0.04, ITSF:−0.26 ± 0.05). In contrast, positive control CI animals recovered completely from injury (Table 1, pre-operative: TSF:−0.01 ± 0.04 ITSF:−0.03 ± 0.05 and 84 dpo: TSF: 0.03 ± 0.04, ITSF:−0.02 ± 0.05, p<0.01).

Bottom Line: In contrast to CI animals, ANT animals did not reach pre-surgical levels of toe spreading.After the observation period, the lipophilic dye DiI was applied to label sensory and motor neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRG; sensory neurons) and spinal cord (motor neurons), respectively.No statistical difference in motor or sensory neuron counts could be detected between ANT and CI animals.In the present study we could indicate that there was no direct relationship between functional recovery (toe spreading) measured by SSI and the number of labelled (motor and sensory) neurons evaluated by retrograde tracing.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plastic Surgery, Reconstructive and Hand Surgery, Burn Center, Medical Faculty, RWTH Aachen University, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen, Germany. svanneerven@ukaachen.de.

ABSTRACT
Evaluation of functional and structural recovery after peripheral nerve injury is crucial to determine the therapeutic effect of a nerve repair strategy. In the present study, we examined the relationship between the structural evaluation of regeneration by means of retrograde tracing and the functional analysis of toe spreading. Two standardized rat sciatic nerve injury models were used to address this relationship. As such, animals received either a 2 cm sciatic nerve defect (neurotmesis) followed by autologous nerve transplantation (ANT animals) or a crush injury with spontaneous recovery (axonotmesis; CI animals). Functional recovery of toe spreading was observed over an observation period of 84 days. In contrast to CI animals, ANT animals did not reach pre-surgical levels of toe spreading. After the observation period, the lipophilic dye DiI was applied to label sensory and motor neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRG; sensory neurons) and spinal cord (motor neurons), respectively. No statistical difference in motor or sensory neuron counts could be detected between ANT and CI animals.In the present study we could indicate that there was no direct relationship between functional recovery (toe spreading) measured by SSI and the number of labelled (motor and sensory) neurons evaluated by retrograde tracing. The present findings demonstrate that a multimodal approach with a variety of independent evaluation tools is essential to understand and estimate the therapeutic benefit of a nerve repair strategy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus