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Comparison of Surgical Outcomes between Robotic and Laparoscopic Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer: The Learning Curve of Robotic Surgery.

Kang BH, Xuan Y, Hur H, Ahn CW, Cho YK, Han SU - J Gastric Cancer (2012)

Bottom Line: The robotic gastrectomy patients were divided into 20 initial cases; and all subsequent cases; and we compared the clinicopathological features, operating times, and surgical outcomes between the three groups.The initial group had a longer average operating time (242.25±74.54 minutes vs. 192.56±39.56 minutes, P>0.001), and hospital stay (14.40±24.93 days vs. 8.66±5.39 days, P=0.001) than the experienced group.Our study shows that robotic gastrectomy is a safe and feasible procedure, especially after the 20 initial cases, and provides a satisfactory postoperative outcome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Laparoscopic gastrectomy is a widely accepted surgical technique. Recently, robotic gastrectomy has been developed, as an alternative minimally invasive surgical technique. This study aimed to evaluate the question of whether robotic gastrectomy is feasible and safe for the treatment of gastric cancer, due to its learning curve.

Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed the prospectively collected data of 100 consecutive robotic gastrectomy patients, from November 2008 to March 2011, and compared them to 282 conventional laparoscopy patients during the same period. The robotic gastrectomy patients were divided into 20 initial cases; and all subsequent cases; and we compared the clinicopathological features, operating times, and surgical outcomes between the three groups.

Results: The initial 20 robotic gastrectomy cases were defined as the initial group, due to the learning curve. The initial group had a longer average operating time (242.25±74.54 minutes vs. 192.56±39.56 minutes, P>0.001), and hospital stay (14.40±24.93 days vs. 8.66±5.39 days, P=0.001) than the experienced group. The length of hospital stay was no different between the experienced group, and the laproscopic gastrectomy group (8.66±5.39 days vs. 8.11±4.10 days, P=0.001). The average blood loss was significantly less for the robotic gastrectomy groups, than for the laparoscopic gastrectomy group (93.25±84.59 ml vs. 173.45±145.19 ml, P<0.001), but the complication rates were no different.

Conclusions: Our study shows that robotic gastrectomy is a safe and feasible procedure, especially after the 20 initial cases, and provides a satisfactory postoperative outcome.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The mean lengths of hospital stay of 10 sequential patients from the initial cases of robotic gastrectomy (error bars represent standard error).
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Figure 3: The mean lengths of hospital stay of 10 sequential patients from the initial cases of robotic gastrectomy (error bars represent standard error).

Mentions: For every 10 cases of RG, we reviewed the average operating time and hospital stay (Fig. 2, 3). The operating time was shorter and similar after 20 RG cases. The standard deviation was also similar for the subsequent 80 cases. The initial 10 cases had longer hospital stays than the other groups because one case of postoperative complications occurred. Except for the initial cases, the other groups had similar hospital stays. The first 20 cases were grouped into the initial group, and the subsequent 80 cases were grouped into the experienced group.


Comparison of Surgical Outcomes between Robotic and Laparoscopic Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer: The Learning Curve of Robotic Surgery.

Kang BH, Xuan Y, Hur H, Ahn CW, Cho YK, Han SU - J Gastric Cancer (2012)

The mean lengths of hospital stay of 10 sequential patients from the initial cases of robotic gastrectomy (error bars represent standard error).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3473222&req=5

Figure 3: The mean lengths of hospital stay of 10 sequential patients from the initial cases of robotic gastrectomy (error bars represent standard error).
Mentions: For every 10 cases of RG, we reviewed the average operating time and hospital stay (Fig. 2, 3). The operating time was shorter and similar after 20 RG cases. The standard deviation was also similar for the subsequent 80 cases. The initial 10 cases had longer hospital stays than the other groups because one case of postoperative complications occurred. Except for the initial cases, the other groups had similar hospital stays. The first 20 cases were grouped into the initial group, and the subsequent 80 cases were grouped into the experienced group.

Bottom Line: The robotic gastrectomy patients were divided into 20 initial cases; and all subsequent cases; and we compared the clinicopathological features, operating times, and surgical outcomes between the three groups.The initial group had a longer average operating time (242.25±74.54 minutes vs. 192.56±39.56 minutes, P>0.001), and hospital stay (14.40±24.93 days vs. 8.66±5.39 days, P=0.001) than the experienced group.Our study shows that robotic gastrectomy is a safe and feasible procedure, especially after the 20 initial cases, and provides a satisfactory postoperative outcome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Laparoscopic gastrectomy is a widely accepted surgical technique. Recently, robotic gastrectomy has been developed, as an alternative minimally invasive surgical technique. This study aimed to evaluate the question of whether robotic gastrectomy is feasible and safe for the treatment of gastric cancer, due to its learning curve.

Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed the prospectively collected data of 100 consecutive robotic gastrectomy patients, from November 2008 to March 2011, and compared them to 282 conventional laparoscopy patients during the same period. The robotic gastrectomy patients were divided into 20 initial cases; and all subsequent cases; and we compared the clinicopathological features, operating times, and surgical outcomes between the three groups.

Results: The initial 20 robotic gastrectomy cases were defined as the initial group, due to the learning curve. The initial group had a longer average operating time (242.25±74.54 minutes vs. 192.56±39.56 minutes, P>0.001), and hospital stay (14.40±24.93 days vs. 8.66±5.39 days, P=0.001) than the experienced group. The length of hospital stay was no different between the experienced group, and the laproscopic gastrectomy group (8.66±5.39 days vs. 8.11±4.10 days, P=0.001). The average blood loss was significantly less for the robotic gastrectomy groups, than for the laparoscopic gastrectomy group (93.25±84.59 ml vs. 173.45±145.19 ml, P<0.001), but the complication rates were no different.

Conclusions: Our study shows that robotic gastrectomy is a safe and feasible procedure, especially after the 20 initial cases, and provides a satisfactory postoperative outcome.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus