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Do substance use risk personality dimensions predict the onset of substance use in early adolescence? A variable- and person-centered approach.

Malmberg M, Kleinjan M, Vermulst AA, Overbeek G, Monshouwer K, Lammers J, Engels RC - J Youth Adolesc (2012)

Bottom Line: For that purpose, longitudinal data of a broader effectiveness study were used from 758 early adolescents (53 % female) aged 11-14 years.Latent profile analyses on the first wave data revealed a three-profile solution for boys (i.e., resilients, internalizers, and externalizers) and a two-profile solution for girls (i.e., resilients and internalizers).In contrast to our expectation, further analyses revealed no significant differences in substance use between the different subprofiles for both boys and girls.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9104, 6500 HE, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. m.malmberg@pwo.ru.nl

ABSTRACT
Various studies found personality to be related to substance use, but little attention is paid to the role of personality risk dimensions with regard to an early onset of alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use. Therefore, the current study used a variable-centered approach to examine whether anxiety sensitivity, hopelessness, sensation seeking, and impulsivity predict the onset of alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use in early adolescence. Additionally, we adopted a person-centered approach to examine whether different personality subgroups could be identified, and whether these subgroups would be predictive of substance use. For that purpose, longitudinal data of a broader effectiveness study were used from 758 early adolescents (53 % female) aged 11-14 years. Structural equation models showed that hopelessness and sensation seeking were predictive of having ever used alcohol and tobacco. Also, sensation seeking was predictive of marijuana use. Latent profile analyses on the first wave data revealed a three-profile solution for boys (i.e., resilients, internalizers, and externalizers) and a two-profile solution for girls (i.e., resilients and internalizers). In contrast to our expectation, further analyses revealed no significant differences in substance use between the different subprofiles for both boys and girls. The separate personality dimensions thus seem more relevant in predicting the onset of substance use compared to the personality profiles. However, the personality profiles might be informative in explaining more excessive substance use behaviors.

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Standardized scores of the two types derived from girls’ reports of anxiety sensitivity, hopelessness, sensation seeking, and impulsivity
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Fig3: Standardized scores of the two types derived from girls’ reports of anxiety sensitivity, hopelessness, sensation seeking, and impulsivity

Mentions: We repeated the procedure as described above for boys and girls separately, the results are shown in Table 4. For boys a four-profile solution (lowest BIC-value) or a three-profile solution (LMRT is non-significant for a four-profile solution) are possible. Again we found a profile high on hopelessness, a second profile low on three personality dimensions and a mean value on anxiety, and a profile high on sensation seeking (see Fig. 2). For the choice of a fourth profile, we have the same dilemma as mentioned before and decided to take a three-profile solution based on theoretical considerations (internalizers, 18.8 %; externalizers, 44.9 %: and resilients, 36.4 %). For girls, a two-profile solution is preferred (LMRT-value is non-significant for a three-profile solution, entropy value of .604 is very low for a three-profile solution. The two-profile solution is partly comparable with the solution for boys (see Fig. 3): one profile with low scores on three personality dimensions and a mean value on anxiety (resilients, 79.3 %) and one profile high on hopelessness (internalizers, 20.7 %). A profile with high levels of sensation seeking can not be found in the three to five profile solutions.Fig. 2


Do substance use risk personality dimensions predict the onset of substance use in early adolescence? A variable- and person-centered approach.

Malmberg M, Kleinjan M, Vermulst AA, Overbeek G, Monshouwer K, Lammers J, Engels RC - J Youth Adolesc (2012)

Standardized scores of the two types derived from girls’ reports of anxiety sensitivity, hopelessness, sensation seeking, and impulsivity
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3473183&req=5

Fig3: Standardized scores of the two types derived from girls’ reports of anxiety sensitivity, hopelessness, sensation seeking, and impulsivity
Mentions: We repeated the procedure as described above for boys and girls separately, the results are shown in Table 4. For boys a four-profile solution (lowest BIC-value) or a three-profile solution (LMRT is non-significant for a four-profile solution) are possible. Again we found a profile high on hopelessness, a second profile low on three personality dimensions and a mean value on anxiety, and a profile high on sensation seeking (see Fig. 2). For the choice of a fourth profile, we have the same dilemma as mentioned before and decided to take a three-profile solution based on theoretical considerations (internalizers, 18.8 %; externalizers, 44.9 %: and resilients, 36.4 %). For girls, a two-profile solution is preferred (LMRT-value is non-significant for a three-profile solution, entropy value of .604 is very low for a three-profile solution. The two-profile solution is partly comparable with the solution for boys (see Fig. 3): one profile with low scores on three personality dimensions and a mean value on anxiety (resilients, 79.3 %) and one profile high on hopelessness (internalizers, 20.7 %). A profile with high levels of sensation seeking can not be found in the three to five profile solutions.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: For that purpose, longitudinal data of a broader effectiveness study were used from 758 early adolescents (53 % female) aged 11-14 years.Latent profile analyses on the first wave data revealed a three-profile solution for boys (i.e., resilients, internalizers, and externalizers) and a two-profile solution for girls (i.e., resilients and internalizers).In contrast to our expectation, further analyses revealed no significant differences in substance use between the different subprofiles for both boys and girls.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9104, 6500 HE, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. m.malmberg@pwo.ru.nl

ABSTRACT
Various studies found personality to be related to substance use, but little attention is paid to the role of personality risk dimensions with regard to an early onset of alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use. Therefore, the current study used a variable-centered approach to examine whether anxiety sensitivity, hopelessness, sensation seeking, and impulsivity predict the onset of alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use in early adolescence. Additionally, we adopted a person-centered approach to examine whether different personality subgroups could be identified, and whether these subgroups would be predictive of substance use. For that purpose, longitudinal data of a broader effectiveness study were used from 758 early adolescents (53 % female) aged 11-14 years. Structural equation models showed that hopelessness and sensation seeking were predictive of having ever used alcohol and tobacco. Also, sensation seeking was predictive of marijuana use. Latent profile analyses on the first wave data revealed a three-profile solution for boys (i.e., resilients, internalizers, and externalizers) and a two-profile solution for girls (i.e., resilients and internalizers). In contrast to our expectation, further analyses revealed no significant differences in substance use between the different subprofiles for both boys and girls. The separate personality dimensions thus seem more relevant in predicting the onset of substance use compared to the personality profiles. However, the personality profiles might be informative in explaining more excessive substance use behaviors.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus