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What sampling device is the most appropriate for vaginal vault cytology in gynaecological cancer follow up?

Del Pup L, Lino del P, Canzonieri V, Vincenzo C, Serraino D, Diego S, Campagnutta E, Elio C - Radiol Oncol (2012)

Bottom Line: The same gynaecologist performed all the procedures.The comparative analysis of the two complete groups indicated that the cytobrush technique was more effective than the spatula one.The odds ratio (OR) for an optimal cytology using the cytobrush was 2.8 (95% confidence interval -C.I. 1.3-6.2; chi-square test, p=0.008).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Gynaecology Oncology Department.

ABSTRACT

Background: In women with cancer-related hysterectomy, the vaginal vault cytology has a low efficacy - when performed by conventional methods - for the early detection of vaginal recurrence. The amount of exfoliated cells collected is generally low because of atrophy, and the vaginal vault corners can be so narrow that the commonly used Ayres spatula cannot often penetrate deeply into them. This prospective study aimed at identifying the advantages obtained in specimens collection using the cytobrush, as compared to the Ayres's spatula. PATIENTS AND METHODS.: 141 gynaecologic cancer patients were studied to compare samplings collected with Ayre's spatula or with cytobrush. In a pilot setting of 15 patients, vaginal cytology samples obtained by both Ayre's spatula and cytobrush were placed at the opposite sites of a single slide for quali-quantitative evaluation. Thereafter, the remaining 126 consecutive women were assigned to either group A (spatula) or B (cytobrush) according to the order of entry. The same gynaecologist performed all the procedures.

Results: In all 15 pilot cases, the cytobrush seemed to collect a higher quantity of material. The comparative analysis of the two complete groups indicated that the cytobrush technique was more effective than the spatula one. The odds ratio (OR) for an optimal cytology using the cytobrush was 2.8 (95% confidence interval -C.I. 1.3-6.2; chi-square test, p=0.008).

Conclusions: Vaginal vault cytology with cytobrush turned out to better perform than the traditional Ayre's spatula to obtain an adequate sampling in gynecological cancer patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cytological sample collected from vaginal vault with Ayre’s spatula (A) and cytobrush (B) (Papanicolau; mag. 100X).
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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f1-rado-46-02-166: Cytological sample collected from vaginal vault with Ayre’s spatula (A) and cytobrush (B) (Papanicolau; mag. 100X).

Mentions: All samples were accepted as adequate. In the preliminary study, fifteen specimens showed a higher cellularity using cytobrush (Figure 1). In the second part of the study, among patients where the vaginal cytology with Ayres spatula was performed, 41 patients had a suboptimal quantity of collected cells and 23 of them an optimal one. Among patients who underwent vaginal cytology with cytobrush, 24 had a suboptimal cytology and 38 an optimal one. This difference was statistically significant (p= 0.008), while the OR for an optimal cytology using the cytobrush was 2.8 (95% C.I. 1.3–6.2) (Table 1). There were no side effects, such as bleeding, in both sampling groups.


What sampling device is the most appropriate for vaginal vault cytology in gynaecological cancer follow up?

Del Pup L, Lino del P, Canzonieri V, Vincenzo C, Serraino D, Diego S, Campagnutta E, Elio C - Radiol Oncol (2012)

Cytological sample collected from vaginal vault with Ayre’s spatula (A) and cytobrush (B) (Papanicolau; mag. 100X).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3472941&req=5

f1-rado-46-02-166: Cytological sample collected from vaginal vault with Ayre’s spatula (A) and cytobrush (B) (Papanicolau; mag. 100X).
Mentions: All samples were accepted as adequate. In the preliminary study, fifteen specimens showed a higher cellularity using cytobrush (Figure 1). In the second part of the study, among patients where the vaginal cytology with Ayres spatula was performed, 41 patients had a suboptimal quantity of collected cells and 23 of them an optimal one. Among patients who underwent vaginal cytology with cytobrush, 24 had a suboptimal cytology and 38 an optimal one. This difference was statistically significant (p= 0.008), while the OR for an optimal cytology using the cytobrush was 2.8 (95% C.I. 1.3–6.2) (Table 1). There were no side effects, such as bleeding, in both sampling groups.

Bottom Line: The same gynaecologist performed all the procedures.The comparative analysis of the two complete groups indicated that the cytobrush technique was more effective than the spatula one.The odds ratio (OR) for an optimal cytology using the cytobrush was 2.8 (95% confidence interval -C.I. 1.3-6.2; chi-square test, p=0.008).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Gynaecology Oncology Department.

ABSTRACT

Background: In women with cancer-related hysterectomy, the vaginal vault cytology has a low efficacy - when performed by conventional methods - for the early detection of vaginal recurrence. The amount of exfoliated cells collected is generally low because of atrophy, and the vaginal vault corners can be so narrow that the commonly used Ayres spatula cannot often penetrate deeply into them. This prospective study aimed at identifying the advantages obtained in specimens collection using the cytobrush, as compared to the Ayres's spatula. PATIENTS AND METHODS.: 141 gynaecologic cancer patients were studied to compare samplings collected with Ayre's spatula or with cytobrush. In a pilot setting of 15 patients, vaginal cytology samples obtained by both Ayre's spatula and cytobrush were placed at the opposite sites of a single slide for quali-quantitative evaluation. Thereafter, the remaining 126 consecutive women were assigned to either group A (spatula) or B (cytobrush) according to the order of entry. The same gynaecologist performed all the procedures.

Results: In all 15 pilot cases, the cytobrush seemed to collect a higher quantity of material. The comparative analysis of the two complete groups indicated that the cytobrush technique was more effective than the spatula one. The odds ratio (OR) for an optimal cytology using the cytobrush was 2.8 (95% confidence interval -C.I. 1.3-6.2; chi-square test, p=0.008).

Conclusions: Vaginal vault cytology with cytobrush turned out to better perform than the traditional Ayre's spatula to obtain an adequate sampling in gynecological cancer patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus