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Development and application of integrated optical sensors for intense E-field measurement.

Zeng R, Wang B, Niu B, Yu Z - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: Integrated optical E-field sensors (IOESs) have important advantages and are potentially suitable for intense E-field detection.More specifically, the improvement work of applying IOESs to intense E-field measurement is illustrated.Finally, typical uses of IOESs in the measurement of intense E-fields are demonstrated, including application areas such as E-fields with different frequency ranges in high-voltage engineering, simulated nuclear electromagnetic pulse in high-power electromagnetic pulses, and ion-accelerating field in high-energy physics.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Lab of Power Systems, Department of Electrical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. zengrong@tsinghua.edu.cn

ABSTRACT
The measurement of intense E-fields is a fundamental need in various research areas. Integrated optical E-field sensors (IOESs) have important advantages and are potentially suitable for intense E-field detection. This paper comprehensively reviews the development and applications of several types of IOESs over the last 30 years, including the Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI), coupler interferometer (CI) and common path interferometer (CPI). The features of the different types of IOESs are compared, showing that the MZI has higher sensitivity, the CI has a controllable optical bias, and the CPI has better temperature stability. More specifically, the improvement work of applying IOESs to intense E-field measurement is illustrated. Finally, typical uses of IOESs in the measurement of intense E-fields are demonstrated, including application areas such as E-fields with different frequency ranges in high-voltage engineering, simulated nuclear electromagnetic pulse in high-power electromagnetic pulses, and ion-accelerating field in high-energy physics.

No MeSH data available.


The CPI-based IOES with dipole antenna and electrode. (a) Schematic of the sensor; (b) Fabricated sensor with dimensions of 5 × 1.2 × 0.5 cm3.
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f17-sensors-12-11406: The CPI-based IOES with dipole antenna and electrode. (a) Schematic of the sensor; (b) Fabricated sensor with dimensions of 5 × 1.2 × 0.5 cm3.

Mentions: To improve the sensitivity, THU designed antennas and electrodes around the waveguide, as shown in Figure 17(a). The Ti-indiffusion waveguide has a length of 2 mm and a width ranging from 10 μm to 12 μm; the antenna has a length of 2 mm, and the electrode has variable dimensions for different Eπ. The IOES after encapsulation is shown in Figure 17(b). This type of sensor could be shorter than the MZI or CI types. Because the waveguide with a favorable optical bias in the CPI could have a length on the order of millimeters, the Y branch of the MZI or CI limits the reduction of the waveguide length.


Development and application of integrated optical sensors for intense E-field measurement.

Zeng R, Wang B, Niu B, Yu Z - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

The CPI-based IOES with dipole antenna and electrode. (a) Schematic of the sensor; (b) Fabricated sensor with dimensions of 5 × 1.2 × 0.5 cm3.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3472891&req=5

f17-sensors-12-11406: The CPI-based IOES with dipole antenna and electrode. (a) Schematic of the sensor; (b) Fabricated sensor with dimensions of 5 × 1.2 × 0.5 cm3.
Mentions: To improve the sensitivity, THU designed antennas and electrodes around the waveguide, as shown in Figure 17(a). The Ti-indiffusion waveguide has a length of 2 mm and a width ranging from 10 μm to 12 μm; the antenna has a length of 2 mm, and the electrode has variable dimensions for different Eπ. The IOES after encapsulation is shown in Figure 17(b). This type of sensor could be shorter than the MZI or CI types. Because the waveguide with a favorable optical bias in the CPI could have a length on the order of millimeters, the Y branch of the MZI or CI limits the reduction of the waveguide length.

Bottom Line: Integrated optical E-field sensors (IOESs) have important advantages and are potentially suitable for intense E-field detection.More specifically, the improvement work of applying IOESs to intense E-field measurement is illustrated.Finally, typical uses of IOESs in the measurement of intense E-fields are demonstrated, including application areas such as E-fields with different frequency ranges in high-voltage engineering, simulated nuclear electromagnetic pulse in high-power electromagnetic pulses, and ion-accelerating field in high-energy physics.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Lab of Power Systems, Department of Electrical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. zengrong@tsinghua.edu.cn

ABSTRACT
The measurement of intense E-fields is a fundamental need in various research areas. Integrated optical E-field sensors (IOESs) have important advantages and are potentially suitable for intense E-field detection. This paper comprehensively reviews the development and applications of several types of IOESs over the last 30 years, including the Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI), coupler interferometer (CI) and common path interferometer (CPI). The features of the different types of IOESs are compared, showing that the MZI has higher sensitivity, the CI has a controllable optical bias, and the CPI has better temperature stability. More specifically, the improvement work of applying IOESs to intense E-field measurement is illustrated. Finally, typical uses of IOESs in the measurement of intense E-fields are demonstrated, including application areas such as E-fields with different frequency ranges in high-voltage engineering, simulated nuclear electromagnetic pulse in high-power electromagnetic pulses, and ion-accelerating field in high-energy physics.

No MeSH data available.