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A beacon interval shifting scheme for interference mitigation in body area networks.

Kim S, Kim S, Kim JW, Eom DS - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: IEEE 802.15 Task Group 6 presented several schemes to reduce such interference, but these schemes are still not proper solutions for BANs.We present a novel distributed TDMA-based beacon interval shifting scheme that reduces interference in the BANs.The simulation results show that the proposed scheme has a lower packet loss, energy consumption, and delivery-latency than the schemes of IEEE 802.15 Task Group 6.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713, Korea. kskkck@korea.ac.kr

ABSTRACT
This paper investigates the issue of interference avoidance in body area networks (BANs). IEEE 802.15 Task Group 6 presented several schemes to reduce such interference, but these schemes are still not proper solutions for BANs. We present a novel distributed TDMA-based beacon interval shifting scheme that reduces interference in the BANs. A design goal of the scheme is to avoid the wakeup period of each BAN coinciding with other networks by employing carrier sensing before a beacon transmission. We analyze the beacon interval shifting scheme and investigate the proper back-off length when the channel is busy. We compare the performance of the proposed scheme with the schemes presented in IEEE 802.15 Task Group 6 using an OMNeT++ simulation. The simulation results show that the proposed scheme has a lower packet loss, energy consumption, and delivery-latency than the schemes of IEEE 802.15 Task Group 6.

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Average network delivery-latency according to the carrier sensing period.
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f8-sensors-12-10930: Average network delivery-latency according to the carrier sensing period.

Mentions: Figure 8 describes the average network delivery-latency with regard to the length of the carrier sensing period. Here, the delivery-latency is the data delivery time from the node to the hub or from the hub to the node. The average delivery-latency of 20 BANs and a 10% duty-cycle exhibits the maximum delivery-latency allowed by the application because the channel is always in the busy state. This means that a longer channel holding time increases the average delivery-latency. However, contrary to the energy consumption results, a longer carrier sensing period leads to a higher average delivery-latency because the length of the back-off is extended. Therefore, we have to adjust the length of the carrier sensing period according to the application requirement, as there is a tradeoff between the delivery-latency and energy consumption.


A beacon interval shifting scheme for interference mitigation in body area networks.

Kim S, Kim S, Kim JW, Eom DS - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Average network delivery-latency according to the carrier sensing period.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3472867&req=5

f8-sensors-12-10930: Average network delivery-latency according to the carrier sensing period.
Mentions: Figure 8 describes the average network delivery-latency with regard to the length of the carrier sensing period. Here, the delivery-latency is the data delivery time from the node to the hub or from the hub to the node. The average delivery-latency of 20 BANs and a 10% duty-cycle exhibits the maximum delivery-latency allowed by the application because the channel is always in the busy state. This means that a longer channel holding time increases the average delivery-latency. However, contrary to the energy consumption results, a longer carrier sensing period leads to a higher average delivery-latency because the length of the back-off is extended. Therefore, we have to adjust the length of the carrier sensing period according to the application requirement, as there is a tradeoff between the delivery-latency and energy consumption.

Bottom Line: IEEE 802.15 Task Group 6 presented several schemes to reduce such interference, but these schemes are still not proper solutions for BANs.We present a novel distributed TDMA-based beacon interval shifting scheme that reduces interference in the BANs.The simulation results show that the proposed scheme has a lower packet loss, energy consumption, and delivery-latency than the schemes of IEEE 802.15 Task Group 6.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713, Korea. kskkck@korea.ac.kr

ABSTRACT
This paper investigates the issue of interference avoidance in body area networks (BANs). IEEE 802.15 Task Group 6 presented several schemes to reduce such interference, but these schemes are still not proper solutions for BANs. We present a novel distributed TDMA-based beacon interval shifting scheme that reduces interference in the BANs. A design goal of the scheme is to avoid the wakeup period of each BAN coinciding with other networks by employing carrier sensing before a beacon transmission. We analyze the beacon interval shifting scheme and investigate the proper back-off length when the channel is busy. We compare the performance of the proposed scheme with the schemes presented in IEEE 802.15 Task Group 6 using an OMNeT++ simulation. The simulation results show that the proposed scheme has a lower packet loss, energy consumption, and delivery-latency than the schemes of IEEE 802.15 Task Group 6.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus