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A linear, millimetre displacement-to-frequency transducer.

Agee JT, Petto FK - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: Experimental results confirm that a displacement of 0-100 mm is converted into a frequency range of 0-100 kHz, with a normalised fidelity factor of 99.91%, and a worst-case nonlinearity of less than 0.08%.Tests using laboratory standards show that a displacement of 10 mm is transduced with an accuracy of ± 0.6%, and a standard deviation of 530 Hz.Estimates included in the paper show that the transducer could cost less than 1% of existing systems for millimeter displacement measurement.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electrical Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X680, Pretoria 0001, South Africa. ageejt@tut.ac.za

ABSTRACT
The paper presents a novel linear, high-fidelity millimetre displacement-to-frequency transducer, based on the resistive conversion of displacement into a proportional voltage, and then frequency. The derivation of the nonlinearity, fidelity and sensitivity of the transducer is presented. Experimental results confirm that a displacement of 0-100 mm is converted into a frequency range of 0-100 kHz, with a normalised fidelity factor of 99.91%, and a worst-case nonlinearity of less than 0.08%. Tests using laboratory standards show that a displacement of 10 mm is transduced with an accuracy of ± 0.6%, and a standard deviation of 530 Hz. Estimates included in the paper show that the transducer could cost less than 1% of existing systems for millimeter displacement measurement.

No MeSH data available.


Equivalent circuit of sensor with primary conditioning amplifier.
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f2-sensors-12-10820: Equivalent circuit of sensor with primary conditioning amplifier.

Mentions: The equivalent circuit resulting from the connection of a primary amplifier of input resistance RL, across terminals AB of the sensor circuit is shown in Figure 2. Loading effects tend to degrade the performance of amplifiers. The loading effect of the conditioning circuit modifies the Thevenin's voltage to:(5)VL=RLRL+RTH⋅Vsx


A linear, millimetre displacement-to-frequency transducer.

Agee JT, Petto FK - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Equivalent circuit of sensor with primary conditioning amplifier.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3472859&req=5

f2-sensors-12-10820: Equivalent circuit of sensor with primary conditioning amplifier.
Mentions: The equivalent circuit resulting from the connection of a primary amplifier of input resistance RL, across terminals AB of the sensor circuit is shown in Figure 2. Loading effects tend to degrade the performance of amplifiers. The loading effect of the conditioning circuit modifies the Thevenin's voltage to:(5)VL=RLRL+RTH⋅Vsx

Bottom Line: Experimental results confirm that a displacement of 0-100 mm is converted into a frequency range of 0-100 kHz, with a normalised fidelity factor of 99.91%, and a worst-case nonlinearity of less than 0.08%.Tests using laboratory standards show that a displacement of 10 mm is transduced with an accuracy of ± 0.6%, and a standard deviation of 530 Hz.Estimates included in the paper show that the transducer could cost less than 1% of existing systems for millimeter displacement measurement.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electrical Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X680, Pretoria 0001, South Africa. ageejt@tut.ac.za

ABSTRACT
The paper presents a novel linear, high-fidelity millimetre displacement-to-frequency transducer, based on the resistive conversion of displacement into a proportional voltage, and then frequency. The derivation of the nonlinearity, fidelity and sensitivity of the transducer is presented. Experimental results confirm that a displacement of 0-100 mm is converted into a frequency range of 0-100 kHz, with a normalised fidelity factor of 99.91%, and a worst-case nonlinearity of less than 0.08%. Tests using laboratory standards show that a displacement of 10 mm is transduced with an accuracy of ± 0.6%, and a standard deviation of 530 Hz. Estimates included in the paper show that the transducer could cost less than 1% of existing systems for millimeter displacement measurement.

No MeSH data available.