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A linear, millimetre displacement-to-frequency transducer.

Agee JT, Petto FK - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: Experimental results confirm that a displacement of 0-100 mm is converted into a frequency range of 0-100 kHz, with a normalised fidelity factor of 99.91%, and a worst-case nonlinearity of less than 0.08%.Tests using laboratory standards show that a displacement of 10 mm is transduced with an accuracy of ± 0.6%, and a standard deviation of 530 Hz.Estimates included in the paper show that the transducer could cost less than 1% of existing systems for millimeter displacement measurement.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electrical Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X680, Pretoria 0001, South Africa. ageejt@tut.ac.za

ABSTRACT
The paper presents a novel linear, high-fidelity millimetre displacement-to-frequency transducer, based on the resistive conversion of displacement into a proportional voltage, and then frequency. The derivation of the nonlinearity, fidelity and sensitivity of the transducer is presented. Experimental results confirm that a displacement of 0-100 mm is converted into a frequency range of 0-100 kHz, with a normalised fidelity factor of 99.91%, and a worst-case nonlinearity of less than 0.08%. Tests using laboratory standards show that a displacement of 10 mm is transduced with an accuracy of ± 0.6%, and a standard deviation of 530 Hz. Estimates included in the paper show that the transducer could cost less than 1% of existing systems for millimeter displacement measurement.

No MeSH data available.


Arrangement of potentiometer-type displacement sensor.
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f1-sensors-12-10820: Arrangement of potentiometer-type displacement sensor.

Mentions: The basic displacement-to-voltage sensor is shown in Figure 1. The sensor consists of a three-terminal potentiometer of total resistance RP, supplied by a DC voltage Vs. The resistance between terminals A and B of the potentiometer is directly related to the displacement d(t) (alternatively, the normalised displacement x), where and d(t) = xdT. Then:(1)ETHVs=RpxRporETH=Vsx


A linear, millimetre displacement-to-frequency transducer.

Agee JT, Petto FK - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Arrangement of potentiometer-type displacement sensor.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3472859&req=5

f1-sensors-12-10820: Arrangement of potentiometer-type displacement sensor.
Mentions: The basic displacement-to-voltage sensor is shown in Figure 1. The sensor consists of a three-terminal potentiometer of total resistance RP, supplied by a DC voltage Vs. The resistance between terminals A and B of the potentiometer is directly related to the displacement d(t) (alternatively, the normalised displacement x), where and d(t) = xdT. Then:(1)ETHVs=RpxRporETH=Vsx

Bottom Line: Experimental results confirm that a displacement of 0-100 mm is converted into a frequency range of 0-100 kHz, with a normalised fidelity factor of 99.91%, and a worst-case nonlinearity of less than 0.08%.Tests using laboratory standards show that a displacement of 10 mm is transduced with an accuracy of ± 0.6%, and a standard deviation of 530 Hz.Estimates included in the paper show that the transducer could cost less than 1% of existing systems for millimeter displacement measurement.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electrical Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X680, Pretoria 0001, South Africa. ageejt@tut.ac.za

ABSTRACT
The paper presents a novel linear, high-fidelity millimetre displacement-to-frequency transducer, based on the resistive conversion of displacement into a proportional voltage, and then frequency. The derivation of the nonlinearity, fidelity and sensitivity of the transducer is presented. Experimental results confirm that a displacement of 0-100 mm is converted into a frequency range of 0-100 kHz, with a normalised fidelity factor of 99.91%, and a worst-case nonlinearity of less than 0.08%. Tests using laboratory standards show that a displacement of 10 mm is transduced with an accuracy of ± 0.6%, and a standard deviation of 530 Hz. Estimates included in the paper show that the transducer could cost less than 1% of existing systems for millimeter displacement measurement.

No MeSH data available.