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Sensing free sulfur dioxide in wine.

Monro TM, Moore RL, Nguyen MC, Ebendorff-Heidepriem H, Skouroumounis GK, Elsey GM, Taylor DK - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: These processes and others consume the SO(2) over time, resulting in wines with little SO(2) protection.This approach adapts a known colorimetric reaction to a suspended core optical fiber sensing platform, and exploits the interaction between guided light located within the fiber voids and a mixture of the wine sample and a colorimetric analyte.We have shown that this technique enables measurements to be made without dilution of the wine samples, thus paving the way towards real time in situ wine monitoring.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Photonics & Advanced Sensing and School of Chemistry & Physics, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia. tanya.monro@adelaide.edu.au

ABSTRACT
Sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) is important in the winemaking process as it aids in preventing microbial growth and the oxidation of wine. These processes and others consume the SO(2) over time, resulting in wines with little SO(2) protection. Furthermore, SO(2) and sulfiting agents are known to be allergens to many individuals and for that reason their levels need to be monitored and regulated in final wine products. Many of the current techniques for monitoring SO(2) in wine require the SO(2) to be separated from the wine prior to analysis. This investigation demonstrates a technique capable of measuring free sulfite concentrations in low volume liquid samples in white wine. This approach adapts a known colorimetric reaction to a suspended core optical fiber sensing platform, and exploits the interaction between guided light located within the fiber voids and a mixture of the wine sample and a colorimetric analyte. We have shown that this technique enables measurements to be made without dilution of the wine samples, thus paving the way towards real time in situ wine monitoring.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Cross section of the suspended core optical fiber used in this wine sensing platform; (b) Red light being launched into the fiber; some of this light overlaps with the analyte and is absorbed.
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f1-sensors-12-10759: (a) Cross section of the suspended core optical fiber used in this wine sensing platform; (b) Red light being launched into the fiber; some of this light overlaps with the analyte and is absorbed.

Mentions: Microstructured optical fibers (MOFs) have an array of micron-scale air holes that run along the length of the fiber [21]. These fibers can be designed such that a significant fraction of the light that is guided along the fiber is located within the holes, where it is then available to interact with gases or liquids that are loaded into these holes (Figure 1) [22]. One variant of microstructured fiber that has been extensively used for sensing is the suspended-core optical fiber, where the core is solid glass [23]. The interaction of the light with the species filling the fiber air holes allows the fibers to be used for sensing techniques such as absorption [22,24] and fluorescence-based sensing [23,25]. These fibers can serve as platforms that allow for sensitive, low volume sensing.


Sensing free sulfur dioxide in wine.

Monro TM, Moore RL, Nguyen MC, Ebendorff-Heidepriem H, Skouroumounis GK, Elsey GM, Taylor DK - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

(a) Cross section of the suspended core optical fiber used in this wine sensing platform; (b) Red light being launched into the fiber; some of this light overlaps with the analyte and is absorbed.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3472855&req=5

f1-sensors-12-10759: (a) Cross section of the suspended core optical fiber used in this wine sensing platform; (b) Red light being launched into the fiber; some of this light overlaps with the analyte and is absorbed.
Mentions: Microstructured optical fibers (MOFs) have an array of micron-scale air holes that run along the length of the fiber [21]. These fibers can be designed such that a significant fraction of the light that is guided along the fiber is located within the holes, where it is then available to interact with gases or liquids that are loaded into these holes (Figure 1) [22]. One variant of microstructured fiber that has been extensively used for sensing is the suspended-core optical fiber, where the core is solid glass [23]. The interaction of the light with the species filling the fiber air holes allows the fibers to be used for sensing techniques such as absorption [22,24] and fluorescence-based sensing [23,25]. These fibers can serve as platforms that allow for sensitive, low volume sensing.

Bottom Line: These processes and others consume the SO(2) over time, resulting in wines with little SO(2) protection.This approach adapts a known colorimetric reaction to a suspended core optical fiber sensing platform, and exploits the interaction between guided light located within the fiber voids and a mixture of the wine sample and a colorimetric analyte.We have shown that this technique enables measurements to be made without dilution of the wine samples, thus paving the way towards real time in situ wine monitoring.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Photonics & Advanced Sensing and School of Chemistry & Physics, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia. tanya.monro@adelaide.edu.au

ABSTRACT
Sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) is important in the winemaking process as it aids in preventing microbial growth and the oxidation of wine. These processes and others consume the SO(2) over time, resulting in wines with little SO(2) protection. Furthermore, SO(2) and sulfiting agents are known to be allergens to many individuals and for that reason their levels need to be monitored and regulated in final wine products. Many of the current techniques for monitoring SO(2) in wine require the SO(2) to be separated from the wine prior to analysis. This investigation demonstrates a technique capable of measuring free sulfite concentrations in low volume liquid samples in white wine. This approach adapts a known colorimetric reaction to a suspended core optical fiber sensing platform, and exploits the interaction between guided light located within the fiber voids and a mixture of the wine sample and a colorimetric analyte. We have shown that this technique enables measurements to be made without dilution of the wine samples, thus paving the way towards real time in situ wine monitoring.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus