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Hyperspectral analysis of soil nitrogen, carbon, carbonate, and organic matter using regression trees.

Gmur S, Vogt D, Zabowski D, Moskal LM - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: Soil samples from different soil horizons of replicated soil series from sites located within Washington and Oregon were analyzed with the FieldSpec Spectroradiometer to measure their spectral signatures across the electromagnetic range of 400 to 1,000 nm.Similarity rankings of individual soil samples reveal differences between replicate series as well as samples within the same replicate series.Statistics resulting from fitted trees were: nitrogen R(2) 0.91 (p < 0.01) at 403, 470, 687, and 846 nm spectral band widths, carbonate R(2) 0.95 (p < 0.01) at 531 and 898 nm band widths, total carbon R(2) 0.93 (p < 0.01) at 400, 409, 441 and 907 nm band widths, and organic matter R(2) 0.98 (p < 0.01) at 300, 400, 441, 832 and 907 nm band widths.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, College of the Environment, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. sgmur@uw.edu

ABSTRACT
The characterization of soil attributes using hyperspectral sensors has revealed patterns in soil spectra that are known to respond to mineral composition, organic matter, soil moisture and particle size distribution. Soil samples from different soil horizons of replicated soil series from sites located within Washington and Oregon were analyzed with the FieldSpec Spectroradiometer to measure their spectral signatures across the electromagnetic range of 400 to 1,000 nm. Similarity rankings of individual soil samples reveal differences between replicate series as well as samples within the same replicate series. Using classification and regression tree statistical methods, regression trees were fitted to each spectral response using concentrations of nitrogen, carbon, carbonate and organic matter as the response variables. Statistics resulting from fitted trees were: nitrogen R(2) 0.91 (p < 0.01) at 403, 470, 687, and 846 nm spectral band widths, carbonate R(2) 0.95 (p < 0.01) at 531 and 898 nm band widths, total carbon R(2) 0.93 (p < 0.01) at 400, 409, 441 and 907 nm band widths, and organic matter R(2) 0.98 (p < 0.01) at 300, 400, 441, 832 and 907 nm band widths. Use of the 400 to 1,000 nm electromagnetic range utilizing regression trees provided a powerful, rapid and inexpensive method for assessing nitrogen, carbon, carbonate and organic matter for upper soil horizons in a nondestructive method.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Plots of the spectral signatures by individual soil series: (a) Athena, (b) Bashaw, (c) Ephrata, (d) Jonas, (e) Lickskillet, and (f) SageHill.
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f4-sensors-12-10639: Plots of the spectral signatures by individual soil series: (a) Athena, (b) Bashaw, (c) Ephrata, (d) Jonas, (e) Lickskillet, and (f) SageHill.

Mentions: The collected spectral signatures, shown in Figures 3 and 4, represent a spectral library that can be used in future applications by others who wish to integrate a library of soil spectra into their study. Collection of soil spectra within a confined laboratory setting allowed for the consistant and systematic acquisition of spectral signatures under controlled lighting conditions as reflected by previous studies [5,14]. As opposed to obtaining soil spectra in a field setting where illumination is frequently inconsistant between different soil pit locations as has been observed in other studies [36,37].


Hyperspectral analysis of soil nitrogen, carbon, carbonate, and organic matter using regression trees.

Gmur S, Vogt D, Zabowski D, Moskal LM - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Plots of the spectral signatures by individual soil series: (a) Athena, (b) Bashaw, (c) Ephrata, (d) Jonas, (e) Lickskillet, and (f) SageHill.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3472848&req=5

f4-sensors-12-10639: Plots of the spectral signatures by individual soil series: (a) Athena, (b) Bashaw, (c) Ephrata, (d) Jonas, (e) Lickskillet, and (f) SageHill.
Mentions: The collected spectral signatures, shown in Figures 3 and 4, represent a spectral library that can be used in future applications by others who wish to integrate a library of soil spectra into their study. Collection of soil spectra within a confined laboratory setting allowed for the consistant and systematic acquisition of spectral signatures under controlled lighting conditions as reflected by previous studies [5,14]. As opposed to obtaining soil spectra in a field setting where illumination is frequently inconsistant between different soil pit locations as has been observed in other studies [36,37].

Bottom Line: Soil samples from different soil horizons of replicated soil series from sites located within Washington and Oregon were analyzed with the FieldSpec Spectroradiometer to measure their spectral signatures across the electromagnetic range of 400 to 1,000 nm.Similarity rankings of individual soil samples reveal differences between replicate series as well as samples within the same replicate series.Statistics resulting from fitted trees were: nitrogen R(2) 0.91 (p < 0.01) at 403, 470, 687, and 846 nm spectral band widths, carbonate R(2) 0.95 (p < 0.01) at 531 and 898 nm band widths, total carbon R(2) 0.93 (p < 0.01) at 400, 409, 441 and 907 nm band widths, and organic matter R(2) 0.98 (p < 0.01) at 300, 400, 441, 832 and 907 nm band widths.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, College of the Environment, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. sgmur@uw.edu

ABSTRACT
The characterization of soil attributes using hyperspectral sensors has revealed patterns in soil spectra that are known to respond to mineral composition, organic matter, soil moisture and particle size distribution. Soil samples from different soil horizons of replicated soil series from sites located within Washington and Oregon were analyzed with the FieldSpec Spectroradiometer to measure their spectral signatures across the electromagnetic range of 400 to 1,000 nm. Similarity rankings of individual soil samples reveal differences between replicate series as well as samples within the same replicate series. Using classification and regression tree statistical methods, regression trees were fitted to each spectral response using concentrations of nitrogen, carbon, carbonate and organic matter as the response variables. Statistics resulting from fitted trees were: nitrogen R(2) 0.91 (p < 0.01) at 403, 470, 687, and 846 nm spectral band widths, carbonate R(2) 0.95 (p < 0.01) at 531 and 898 nm band widths, total carbon R(2) 0.93 (p < 0.01) at 400, 409, 441 and 907 nm band widths, and organic matter R(2) 0.98 (p < 0.01) at 300, 400, 441, 832 and 907 nm band widths. Use of the 400 to 1,000 nm electromagnetic range utilizing regression trees provided a powerful, rapid and inexpensive method for assessing nitrogen, carbon, carbonate and organic matter for upper soil horizons in a nondestructive method.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus