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Binaural sound localizer for azimuthal movement detection based on diffraction.

Kim K, Choi A - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: The gradient analysis of the ILD between the structured and unstructured microphone demonstrates the rotation directions as clockwise, counter clockwise, and no rotation of the sound source.Acoustic experiments with different types of sound source over a wide range of target movements show that the average true positive and false positive rates are 67% and 16%, respectively.Spectral analysis demonstrates that the low frequency delivers decreased true and false positive rates and the high frequency presents increases of both rates, overall.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Electronics & Electrical Engineering, Dongguk University-Seoul, Seoul 100-715, Korea. kwkim@dongguk.edu

ABSTRACT
Sound localization can be realized by utilizing the physics of acoustics in various methods. This paper investigates a novel detection architecture for the azimuthal movement of sound source based on the interaural level difference (ILD) between two receivers. One of the microphones in the system is surrounded by barriers of various heights in order to cast the direction dependent diffraction of the incoming signal. The gradient analysis of the ILD between the structured and unstructured microphone demonstrates the rotation directions as clockwise, counter clockwise, and no rotation of the sound source. Acoustic experiments with different types of sound source over a wide range of target movements show that the average true positive and false positive rates are 67% and 16%, respectively. Spectral analysis demonstrates that the low frequency delivers decreased true and false positive rates and the high frequency presents increases of both rates, overall.

No MeSH data available.


Acoustic experiment in the anechoic chamber with RDD structure.
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f7-sensors-12-10584: Acoustic experiment in the anechoic chamber with RDD structure.

Mentions: The equipment and configuration used in the experiments are listed as follows. The speaker (Yamaha; HS80M) is an active studio monitor speaker with an 8″ low frequency driver and a 1″ high frequency driver. The speaker can generate up to 120 watt power over the range from 42 Hz to 20 kHz and is connected by the balanced XLR cable. The microphone (Behringer; ECM8000) is a condenser microphone for measurement with flat frequency response and omnidirectional pattern. The microphone works with phantom power and is connected by balanced XLR cable. The audio device (Cakewalk; Sonar V-Studio 100) is a multiple input and output audio device which can handle up to 8 inputs/6 outputs with 24 bits/96 kHz sampling quality. The device is connected by USB and driven via ASIO 2.0 driver. The computer software for mixing and capturing is Sonar VS from Cakewalk. The laser level meter (Black & Decker; BDL220S) located on top of the speaker radiates the vertical laser surface for indicating the DoA angle which is estimated by the protractor placed in the bottom of the RDD structure. The distance between the microphone end and the speaker driver is 1.2 m. As shown in Figure 7, the RDD structure is suspended over the microphone with fishing wire from the chamber ceiling; therefore, the RDD structure rotates freely in the acoustically transparent condition.


Binaural sound localizer for azimuthal movement detection based on diffraction.

Kim K, Choi A - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Acoustic experiment in the anechoic chamber with RDD structure.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3472845&req=5

f7-sensors-12-10584: Acoustic experiment in the anechoic chamber with RDD structure.
Mentions: The equipment and configuration used in the experiments are listed as follows. The speaker (Yamaha; HS80M) is an active studio monitor speaker with an 8″ low frequency driver and a 1″ high frequency driver. The speaker can generate up to 120 watt power over the range from 42 Hz to 20 kHz and is connected by the balanced XLR cable. The microphone (Behringer; ECM8000) is a condenser microphone for measurement with flat frequency response and omnidirectional pattern. The microphone works with phantom power and is connected by balanced XLR cable. The audio device (Cakewalk; Sonar V-Studio 100) is a multiple input and output audio device which can handle up to 8 inputs/6 outputs with 24 bits/96 kHz sampling quality. The device is connected by USB and driven via ASIO 2.0 driver. The computer software for mixing and capturing is Sonar VS from Cakewalk. The laser level meter (Black & Decker; BDL220S) located on top of the speaker radiates the vertical laser surface for indicating the DoA angle which is estimated by the protractor placed in the bottom of the RDD structure. The distance between the microphone end and the speaker driver is 1.2 m. As shown in Figure 7, the RDD structure is suspended over the microphone with fishing wire from the chamber ceiling; therefore, the RDD structure rotates freely in the acoustically transparent condition.

Bottom Line: The gradient analysis of the ILD between the structured and unstructured microphone demonstrates the rotation directions as clockwise, counter clockwise, and no rotation of the sound source.Acoustic experiments with different types of sound source over a wide range of target movements show that the average true positive and false positive rates are 67% and 16%, respectively.Spectral analysis demonstrates that the low frequency delivers decreased true and false positive rates and the high frequency presents increases of both rates, overall.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Electronics & Electrical Engineering, Dongguk University-Seoul, Seoul 100-715, Korea. kwkim@dongguk.edu

ABSTRACT
Sound localization can be realized by utilizing the physics of acoustics in various methods. This paper investigates a novel detection architecture for the azimuthal movement of sound source based on the interaural level difference (ILD) between two receivers. One of the microphones in the system is surrounded by barriers of various heights in order to cast the direction dependent diffraction of the incoming signal. The gradient analysis of the ILD between the structured and unstructured microphone demonstrates the rotation directions as clockwise, counter clockwise, and no rotation of the sound source. Acoustic experiments with different types of sound source over a wide range of target movements show that the average true positive and false positive rates are 67% and 16%, respectively. Spectral analysis demonstrates that the low frequency delivers decreased true and false positive rates and the high frequency presents increases of both rates, overall.

No MeSH data available.