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Pedestrian navigation based on a waist-worn inertial sensor.

Alvarez JC, Alvarez D, López A, González RC - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: We present a waist-worn personal navigation system based on inertial measurement units.The device makes use of the human bipedal pattern to reduce position errors.We describe improved algorithms, based on detailed description of the heel strike biomechanics and its translation to accelerations of the body waist to estimate the periods of zero velocity, the step length, and the heading estimation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Multisensor Systems & Robotics Lab (SiMuR), Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oviedo, Campus de Gijón, Edificio n°2, Gijón 33204, Spain. juan@uniovi.es

ABSTRACT
We present a waist-worn personal navigation system based on inertial measurement units. The device makes use of the human bipedal pattern to reduce position errors. We describe improved algorithms, based on detailed description of the heel strike biomechanics and its translation to accelerations of the body waist to estimate the periods of zero velocity, the step length, and the heading estimation. The experimental results show that we are able to support pedestrian navigation with the high-resolution positioning required for most applications.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Orientation estimation outdoor tests, with uncalibrated step length. (a) Path 240 m long; (b) Path 460 m long (axis in meters). Tracks (left) and their corresponding real-time reconstruction (right) in two scenarios, by using only motion state detection (blue path), and by motion detection + calibration (red path).
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f5-sensors-12-10536: Orientation estimation outdoor tests, with uncalibrated step length. (a) Path 240 m long; (b) Path 460 m long (axis in meters). Tracks (left) and their corresponding real-time reconstruction (right) in two scenarios, by using only motion state detection (blue path), and by motion detection + calibration (red path).

Mentions: Orientation estimation being the most difficult part, we carried out long distance outdoor walks to provide more insight into the performance of this component of the PDR. We tested the combination of individual calibration for users and tracks, and the motion detection idea to avoid unnecessary gyro integration. Figure 5 shows the better results obtained when adding calibration to motion detection. Experiments were made outside the department building, using a commercial GPS positioning system, over two predefined paths, of 460 m and 240 m respectively.


Pedestrian navigation based on a waist-worn inertial sensor.

Alvarez JC, Alvarez D, López A, González RC - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Orientation estimation outdoor tests, with uncalibrated step length. (a) Path 240 m long; (b) Path 460 m long (axis in meters). Tracks (left) and their corresponding real-time reconstruction (right) in two scenarios, by using only motion state detection (blue path), and by motion detection + calibration (red path).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3472842&req=5

f5-sensors-12-10536: Orientation estimation outdoor tests, with uncalibrated step length. (a) Path 240 m long; (b) Path 460 m long (axis in meters). Tracks (left) and their corresponding real-time reconstruction (right) in two scenarios, by using only motion state detection (blue path), and by motion detection + calibration (red path).
Mentions: Orientation estimation being the most difficult part, we carried out long distance outdoor walks to provide more insight into the performance of this component of the PDR. We tested the combination of individual calibration for users and tracks, and the motion detection idea to avoid unnecessary gyro integration. Figure 5 shows the better results obtained when adding calibration to motion detection. Experiments were made outside the department building, using a commercial GPS positioning system, over two predefined paths, of 460 m and 240 m respectively.

Bottom Line: We present a waist-worn personal navigation system based on inertial measurement units.The device makes use of the human bipedal pattern to reduce position errors.We describe improved algorithms, based on detailed description of the heel strike biomechanics and its translation to accelerations of the body waist to estimate the periods of zero velocity, the step length, and the heading estimation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Multisensor Systems & Robotics Lab (SiMuR), Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oviedo, Campus de Gijón, Edificio n°2, Gijón 33204, Spain. juan@uniovi.es

ABSTRACT
We present a waist-worn personal navigation system based on inertial measurement units. The device makes use of the human bipedal pattern to reduce position errors. We describe improved algorithms, based on detailed description of the heel strike biomechanics and its translation to accelerations of the body waist to estimate the periods of zero velocity, the step length, and the heading estimation. The experimental results show that we are able to support pedestrian navigation with the high-resolution positioning required for most applications.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus