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Pedestrian navigation based on a waist-worn inertial sensor.

Alvarez JC, Alvarez D, López A, González RC - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: We present a waist-worn personal navigation system based on inertial measurement units.The device makes use of the human bipedal pattern to reduce position errors.We describe improved algorithms, based on detailed description of the heel strike biomechanics and its translation to accelerations of the body waist to estimate the periods of zero velocity, the step length, and the heading estimation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Multisensor Systems & Robotics Lab (SiMuR), Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oviedo, Campus de Gijón, Edificio n°2, Gijón 33204, Spain. juan@uniovi.es

ABSTRACT
We present a waist-worn personal navigation system based on inertial measurement units. The device makes use of the human bipedal pattern to reduce position errors. We describe improved algorithms, based on detailed description of the heel strike biomechanics and its translation to accelerations of the body waist to estimate the periods of zero velocity, the step length, and the heading estimation. The experimental results show that we are able to support pedestrian navigation with the high-resolution positioning required for most applications.

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Short-range indoor experiments. (a) Location A, a closed path 39 meters long and 360 degrees turns, real-time results of one experiment; (b) Location B, a closed path 91 meters long with 360 degrees turns.
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f4-sensors-12-10536: Short-range indoor experiments. (a) Location A, a closed path 39 meters long and 360 degrees turns, real-time results of one experiment; (b) Location B, a closed path 91 meters long with 360 degrees turns.

Mentions: We performed short and long range experiments in three different locations. Initial walking direction is introduced by hand. The short distance runs were made in two office environments, represented in Figure 4(a). A 39 m long square was used for the first test and adjustment purposes. It has a total rotation of 360 degrees, 270 degrees to the left and 90 degrees to the right. The path ends at the same initial point, but with a 180 degree orientation with respect to the start. An extended version of these trials, but 91 m long, was made in Location B in Figure 4(b). Finally, Figure 3 depicts experiments in Location C, a 179 m long path with a total 360 degrees left turn and 180 degree right turn, that is, 540 degree overall. Trajectories in both Figures 3 and 4 are those produced in real-time by the developed PDR system.


Pedestrian navigation based on a waist-worn inertial sensor.

Alvarez JC, Alvarez D, López A, González RC - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Short-range indoor experiments. (a) Location A, a closed path 39 meters long and 360 degrees turns, real-time results of one experiment; (b) Location B, a closed path 91 meters long with 360 degrees turns.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3472842&req=5

f4-sensors-12-10536: Short-range indoor experiments. (a) Location A, a closed path 39 meters long and 360 degrees turns, real-time results of one experiment; (b) Location B, a closed path 91 meters long with 360 degrees turns.
Mentions: We performed short and long range experiments in three different locations. Initial walking direction is introduced by hand. The short distance runs were made in two office environments, represented in Figure 4(a). A 39 m long square was used for the first test and adjustment purposes. It has a total rotation of 360 degrees, 270 degrees to the left and 90 degrees to the right. The path ends at the same initial point, but with a 180 degree orientation with respect to the start. An extended version of these trials, but 91 m long, was made in Location B in Figure 4(b). Finally, Figure 3 depicts experiments in Location C, a 179 m long path with a total 360 degrees left turn and 180 degree right turn, that is, 540 degree overall. Trajectories in both Figures 3 and 4 are those produced in real-time by the developed PDR system.

Bottom Line: We present a waist-worn personal navigation system based on inertial measurement units.The device makes use of the human bipedal pattern to reduce position errors.We describe improved algorithms, based on detailed description of the heel strike biomechanics and its translation to accelerations of the body waist to estimate the periods of zero velocity, the step length, and the heading estimation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Multisensor Systems & Robotics Lab (SiMuR), Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oviedo, Campus de Gijón, Edificio n°2, Gijón 33204, Spain. juan@uniovi.es

ABSTRACT
We present a waist-worn personal navigation system based on inertial measurement units. The device makes use of the human bipedal pattern to reduce position errors. We describe improved algorithms, based on detailed description of the heel strike biomechanics and its translation to accelerations of the body waist to estimate the periods of zero velocity, the step length, and the heading estimation. The experimental results show that we are able to support pedestrian navigation with the high-resolution positioning required for most applications.

Show MeSH