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Pedestrian navigation based on a waist-worn inertial sensor.

Alvarez JC, Alvarez D, López A, González RC - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: We present a waist-worn personal navigation system based on inertial measurement units.The device makes use of the human bipedal pattern to reduce position errors.We describe improved algorithms, based on detailed description of the heel strike biomechanics and its translation to accelerations of the body waist to estimate the periods of zero velocity, the step length, and the heading estimation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Multisensor Systems & Robotics Lab (SiMuR), Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oviedo, Campus de Gijón, Edificio n°2, Gijón 33204, Spain. juan@uniovi.es

ABSTRACT
We present a waist-worn personal navigation system based on inertial measurement units. The device makes use of the human bipedal pattern to reduce position errors. We describe improved algorithms, based on detailed description of the heel strike biomechanics and its translation to accelerations of the body waist to estimate the periods of zero velocity, the step length, and the heading estimation. The experimental results show that we are able to support pedestrian navigation with the high-resolution positioning required for most applications.

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Gait events and their notation in vertical and antero-posterior trunk accelerations. (a) Step length estimation between Initial Contact events (IC) from left and right foot, using the Final Contact event (FC) to limit the integral; (b) IC and FC events reflection in measured trunk accelerations, and how they are detected in real-time.
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f1-sensors-12-10536: Gait events and their notation in vertical and antero-posterior trunk accelerations. (a) Step length estimation between Initial Contact events (IC) from left and right foot, using the Final Contact event (FC) to limit the integral; (b) IC and FC events reflection in measured trunk accelerations, and how they are detected in real-time.

Mentions: Our algorithm has its roots in the description of gait events given by [21,22] from the vertical acceleration of the lumbar area. Such a description, see Figure 1(a), shows a multimodal signal for each step composed of three main peaks, where the initial contact corresponds to the first valley (V2) and the second valley (V4) is associated with the contralateral final contact. Regarding the antero-posterior acceleration, the higher peak (IC) corresponds with the Initial Contact, and the lower peak with the Final Contact (FC).


Pedestrian navigation based on a waist-worn inertial sensor.

Alvarez JC, Alvarez D, López A, González RC - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Gait events and their notation in vertical and antero-posterior trunk accelerations. (a) Step length estimation between Initial Contact events (IC) from left and right foot, using the Final Contact event (FC) to limit the integral; (b) IC and FC events reflection in measured trunk accelerations, and how they are detected in real-time.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3472842&req=5

f1-sensors-12-10536: Gait events and their notation in vertical and antero-posterior trunk accelerations. (a) Step length estimation between Initial Contact events (IC) from left and right foot, using the Final Contact event (FC) to limit the integral; (b) IC and FC events reflection in measured trunk accelerations, and how they are detected in real-time.
Mentions: Our algorithm has its roots in the description of gait events given by [21,22] from the vertical acceleration of the lumbar area. Such a description, see Figure 1(a), shows a multimodal signal for each step composed of three main peaks, where the initial contact corresponds to the first valley (V2) and the second valley (V4) is associated with the contralateral final contact. Regarding the antero-posterior acceleration, the higher peak (IC) corresponds with the Initial Contact, and the lower peak with the Final Contact (FC).

Bottom Line: We present a waist-worn personal navigation system based on inertial measurement units.The device makes use of the human bipedal pattern to reduce position errors.We describe improved algorithms, based on detailed description of the heel strike biomechanics and its translation to accelerations of the body waist to estimate the periods of zero velocity, the step length, and the heading estimation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Multisensor Systems & Robotics Lab (SiMuR), Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oviedo, Campus de Gijón, Edificio n°2, Gijón 33204, Spain. juan@uniovi.es

ABSTRACT
We present a waist-worn personal navigation system based on inertial measurement units. The device makes use of the human bipedal pattern to reduce position errors. We describe improved algorithms, based on detailed description of the heel strike biomechanics and its translation to accelerations of the body waist to estimate the periods of zero velocity, the step length, and the heading estimation. The experimental results show that we are able to support pedestrian navigation with the high-resolution positioning required for most applications.

Show MeSH