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In-line fiber optic interferometric sensors in single-mode fibers.

Zhu T, Wu D, Liu M, Duan DW - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: Typical in-line fiber-optic interferometers are of two types: Fabry-Perot interferometers and core-cladding-mode interferometers.It's known that the in-line fiber optic interferometers based on single-mode fibers can exhibit compact structures, easy fabrication and low cost.Also, some recently reported specific technologies for fabricating such fiber optic interferometers are presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology & Systems (Ministry of Education), Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044, China. zhutao@cqu.edu.cn

ABSTRACT
In-line fiber optic interferometers have attracted intensive attention for their potential sensing applications in refractive index, temperature, pressure and strain measurement, etc. Typical in-line fiber-optic interferometers are of two types: Fabry-Perot interferometers and core-cladding-mode interferometers. It's known that the in-line fiber optic interferometers based on single-mode fibers can exhibit compact structures, easy fabrication and low cost. In this paper, we review two kinds of typical in-line fiber optic interferometers formed in single-mode fibers fabricated with different post-processing techniques. Also, some recently reported specific technologies for fabricating such fiber optic interferometers are presented.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The sensing applications of the air-bubble-based FPI with 91 μm air bubble: (a) the strain sensitivity, inset is the shifts of one of the interference dips as the strain increases; (b) the temperature sensitivity, inset is the shifts of the interference dip at 100 °C (solid curve) and 1,000 °C (dashed curve).
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f6-sensors-12-10430: The sensing applications of the air-bubble-based FPI with 91 μm air bubble: (a) the strain sensitivity, inset is the shifts of one of the interference dips as the strain increases; (b) the temperature sensitivity, inset is the shifts of the interference dip at 100 °C (solid curve) and 1,000 °C (dashed curve).

Mentions: The air bubble was realized by adjusting the splicing parameters of the commercial arc splicer (Fitel S176) to certain values. Figure 5(b) shows the reflective spectra of such two air-bubble-based FPIs with cavity length of approximately 91 μm, and the high-quality interference spectra with a fringe visibility of ∼8 dB were observed. Both the influences of strain and temperature on the reflective interference signal of the two air-bubble-based FPI sensors were experimentally studied. Figure 6(a) shows the strain responses of the two sensors under a constant temperature (∼15 °C) at the wavelength of ∼1,544 nm, inset figure is the wavelength shift of sensor 1 versus strain increases. The temperature response of the two sensors is shown in Figure 6(b), and the inset figure is the reflective spectra of sensor 1 and sensor 2 at 100 °C and 1,000 °C, respectively. As shown in Figure 4, air-bubble-based FPI sensors have higher strain sensitivity of ∼4.2 pm/με for sensor 1 and ∼4.0 pm/με for sensor 2, which is almost 150% higher than that of the results reported by references [49–51]. However, the temperature sensitivity of the air-bubble-based FPI sensors is only 0.848 pm/°C, which is much less than the temperature sensitivity of FBG (10 pm/°C) [3]. It can be noted that the strain sensitivity and temperature sensitivity of air-bubble-based FPI depends on the cavity length L and the material thermal expansion, respectively. Therefore, such an air-bubble-based FPI offers the advantage of high strain sensitivity with small temperature influence due to the larger bubble diameter (91 μm) and low thermal-expansion coefficient of pure silica (0.5 × 10−6/°C) [69], which makes it attractive for strain sensing applications.


In-line fiber optic interferometric sensors in single-mode fibers.

Zhu T, Wu D, Liu M, Duan DW - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

The sensing applications of the air-bubble-based FPI with 91 μm air bubble: (a) the strain sensitivity, inset is the shifts of one of the interference dips as the strain increases; (b) the temperature sensitivity, inset is the shifts of the interference dip at 100 °C (solid curve) and 1,000 °C (dashed curve).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3472836&req=5

f6-sensors-12-10430: The sensing applications of the air-bubble-based FPI with 91 μm air bubble: (a) the strain sensitivity, inset is the shifts of one of the interference dips as the strain increases; (b) the temperature sensitivity, inset is the shifts of the interference dip at 100 °C (solid curve) and 1,000 °C (dashed curve).
Mentions: The air bubble was realized by adjusting the splicing parameters of the commercial arc splicer (Fitel S176) to certain values. Figure 5(b) shows the reflective spectra of such two air-bubble-based FPIs with cavity length of approximately 91 μm, and the high-quality interference spectra with a fringe visibility of ∼8 dB were observed. Both the influences of strain and temperature on the reflective interference signal of the two air-bubble-based FPI sensors were experimentally studied. Figure 6(a) shows the strain responses of the two sensors under a constant temperature (∼15 °C) at the wavelength of ∼1,544 nm, inset figure is the wavelength shift of sensor 1 versus strain increases. The temperature response of the two sensors is shown in Figure 6(b), and the inset figure is the reflective spectra of sensor 1 and sensor 2 at 100 °C and 1,000 °C, respectively. As shown in Figure 4, air-bubble-based FPI sensors have higher strain sensitivity of ∼4.2 pm/με for sensor 1 and ∼4.0 pm/με for sensor 2, which is almost 150% higher than that of the results reported by references [49–51]. However, the temperature sensitivity of the air-bubble-based FPI sensors is only 0.848 pm/°C, which is much less than the temperature sensitivity of FBG (10 pm/°C) [3]. It can be noted that the strain sensitivity and temperature sensitivity of air-bubble-based FPI depends on the cavity length L and the material thermal expansion, respectively. Therefore, such an air-bubble-based FPI offers the advantage of high strain sensitivity with small temperature influence due to the larger bubble diameter (91 μm) and low thermal-expansion coefficient of pure silica (0.5 × 10−6/°C) [69], which makes it attractive for strain sensing applications.

Bottom Line: Typical in-line fiber-optic interferometers are of two types: Fabry-Perot interferometers and core-cladding-mode interferometers.It's known that the in-line fiber optic interferometers based on single-mode fibers can exhibit compact structures, easy fabrication and low cost.Also, some recently reported specific technologies for fabricating such fiber optic interferometers are presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology & Systems (Ministry of Education), Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044, China. zhutao@cqu.edu.cn

ABSTRACT
In-line fiber optic interferometers have attracted intensive attention for their potential sensing applications in refractive index, temperature, pressure and strain measurement, etc. Typical in-line fiber-optic interferometers are of two types: Fabry-Perot interferometers and core-cladding-mode interferometers. It's known that the in-line fiber optic interferometers based on single-mode fibers can exhibit compact structures, easy fabrication and low cost. In this paper, we review two kinds of typical in-line fiber optic interferometers formed in single-mode fibers fabricated with different post-processing techniques. Also, some recently reported specific technologies for fabricating such fiber optic interferometers are presented.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus